TO THE PLACE OF SHELLS by Sarah Ferguson

TO THE PLACE OF SHELLS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In pearl-pink prose, To The Place of Shells seems to be an autobiographical memoir beginning in 1941 although if you were to reverse the last two digits it would seem less of an anachronism. As a child, after the death of her mother, Sarah knew the ""everlastingness"" of life with her Nan(ny) and grandmother while her handsome father, known as ""Boy,"" remarried. Sarah for one reason or another seems to weep a great deal and after ""Boy's"" sudden death consults a ""neurologist."" The depression lifts when she goes to Scotland, to the house/farm/ ruined castle of the title which will be her sanctuary after she marries even if she cannot hold her husband Martin in that quiet everlastingness. ""It was a happy and a treasured day""--would there had been more of them.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1975
Publisher: St. Martin's