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GIACOMO'S DAUGHTER

From the The Sofia Spera Trilogy series , Vol. 1

First-rate historical fiction about the mistreated wife of a Detroit gangster during the Roaring ’20s.

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A young woman of the 1920s must rely on her own savvy and wiles if she’s to escape her abusive mobster husband in this debut novel.

Eighteen-year-old newlywed Sofia Spera, now Mrs. Denaro, plans a picnic on the lake with her husband, Max. It’s a rare night off for him, as he’s the second-in-command of the Scalici Squad, a faction of the Detroit Italian Mafia. Sofia hopes the two can enjoy a quiet meal and a little intimacy. However, when their conversation turns to their courtship, Max’s recollection of meeting Sofia at the Book–Cadillac Hotel, where she was a temporary backup singer, doesn’t remotely resemble hers. Unlike Max’s romantic account, Sofia’s memory is that he took her back to his place and forced himself on her. In fact, Max has been incessantly abusive during their time together, including in his proposal. Sofia has looked for support, but it seems everyone is afraid of Max and his gangster connections, and even her overprotective Sicilian father, Giacomo, is helpless. As Max goes to terrifying lengths to ensure that Sofia is his and his only, Sofia realizes that she has no choice but to help herself, however dark that option may be. The Savone Sisters skillfully craft a timeline-hopping narrative told predominantly through flashbacks; though scenes don’t unfold chronologically, they’re coherent and cohesive. Sofia’s predicament is painful, but it’s invigorating to watch her garner strength, using noticeably different tactics than her repugnant spouse does. Although it’s clear where Sofia’s “mission” is headed, the story is often surprising, with both promising and tragic turns. In their first book in the planned Sofia Spera trilogy, the Savone Sisters aptly detail the time period and enrich the story with lavish prose: “The dark mahogany walls of the grand ballroom dripped with gorgeous overflowing arrays of white and red gladiolus flowers with soft blush pink Tiffany roses.”

First-rate historical fiction about the mistreated wife of a Detroit gangster during the Roaring ’20s. (epilogue, acknowledgements, author bio)

Pub Date: Feb. 14, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-73446-881-6

Page Count: 334

Publisher: LIV Luhv Rahyt, Inc.

Review Posted Online: March 27, 2020

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  • New York Times Bestseller

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THE WOMEN

A dramatic, vividly detailed reconstruction of a little-known aspect of the Vietnam War.

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A young woman’s experience as a nurse in Vietnam casts a deep shadow over her life.

When we learn that the farewell party in the opening scene is for Frances “Frankie” McGrath’s older brother—“a golden boy, a wild child who could make the hardest heart soften”—who is leaving to serve in Vietnam in 1966, we feel pretty certain that poor Finley McGrath is marked for death. Still, it’s a surprise when the fateful doorbell rings less than 20 pages later. His death inspires his sister to enlist as an Army nurse, and this turn of events is just the beginning of a roller coaster of a plot that’s impressive and engrossing if at times a bit formulaic. Hannah renders the experiences of the young women who served in Vietnam in all-encompassing detail. The first half of the book, set in gore-drenched hospital wards, mildewed dorm rooms, and boozy officers’ clubs, is an exciting read, tracking the transformation of virginal, uptight Frankie into a crack surgical nurse and woman of the world. Her tensely platonic romance with a married surgeon ends when his broken, unbreathing body is airlifted out by helicopter; she throws her pent-up passion into a wild affair with a soldier who happens to be her dead brother’s best friend. In the second part of the book, after the war, Frankie seems to experience every possible bad break. A drawback of the story is that none of the secondary characters in her life are fully three-dimensional: Her dismissive, chauvinistic father and tight-lipped, pill-popping mother, her fellow nurses, and her various love interests are more plot devices than people. You’ll wish you could have gone to Vegas and placed a bet on the ending—while it’s against all the odds, you’ll see it coming from a mile away.

A dramatic, vividly detailed reconstruction of a little-known aspect of the Vietnam War.

Pub Date: Feb. 6, 2024

ISBN: 9781250178633

Page Count: 480

Publisher: St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: Nov. 4, 2023

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2023

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THE FAMILIAR

Lush, gorgeous, precise language and propulsive plotting sweep readers into a story as intelligent as it is atmospheric.

In 16th-century Madrid, a crypto-Jew with a talent for casting spells tries to steer clear of the Inquisition.

Luzia Cotado, a scullion and an orphan, has secrets to keep: “It was a game she and her mother had played, saying one thing and thinking another, the bits and pieces of Hebrew handed down like chipped plates.” Also handed down are “refranes”—proverbs—in “not quite Spanish, just as Luzia was not quite Spanish.” When Luzia sings the refranes, they take on power. “Aboltar cazal, aboltar mazal” (“A change of scene, a change of fortune”) can mend a torn gown or turn burnt bread into a perfect loaf; “Quien no risica, no rosica” (“Whoever doesn’t laugh, doesn’t bloom”) can summon a riot of foliage in the depths of winter. The Inquisition hangs over the story like Chekhov’s famous gun on the wall. When Luzia’s employer catches her using magic, the ambitions of both mistress and servant catapult her into fame and danger. A new, even more ambitious patron instructs his supernatural servant, Guillén Santángel, to train Luzia for a magical contest. Santángel, not Luzia, is the familiar of the title; he has been tricked into trading his freedom and luck to his master’s family in exchange for something he no longer craves but can’t give up. The novel comes up against an issue common in fantasy fiction: Why don’t the characters just use their magic to solve all their problems? Bardugo has clearly given it some thought, but her solutions aren’t quite convincing, especially toward the end of the book. These small faults would be harder to forgive if she weren’t such a beautiful writer. Part fairy tale, part political thriller, part romance, the novel unfolds like a winter tree bursting into unnatural bloom in response to one of Luzia’s refranes, as she and Santángel learn about power, trust, betrayal, and love.

Lush, gorgeous, precise language and propulsive plotting sweep readers into a story as intelligent as it is atmospheric.

Pub Date: April 9, 2024

ISBN: 9781250884251

Page Count: 400

Publisher: Flatiron Books

Review Posted Online: Feb. 3, 2024

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2024

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