Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 2)

THE FIRE SERMON by Francesca Haig
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 10, 2015

"With its well-built world, vivid characters and suspenseful plot, this book, the first in a planned trilogy, is poised to become the next must-read hit."
A suspenseful post-apocalyptic adventure about a world cleaved in two. Read full book review >
THE EXILE by C.T. Adams
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 10, 2015

"It's not exactly deep, but this book (the first in a planned series) will entertain readers looking for a fun fantasy that mixes adventure with just a bit of romance."
A fast-paced fantasy about a half-faerie, half-human girl struggling to figure out which world she really belongs in. Read full book review >

THE MECHANICAL by Ian Tregillis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 10, 2015

"Not quite yet peak Tregillis, but his fans—and other readers with an interest in dark, intelligent fantasy—will find much to admire here."
First of a new fantasy trilogy from the author of the splendid Something More Than Night (2013, etc.).Read full book review >
THE ALEX CROW by Andrew Smith
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 5, 2015

"Magnificently bizarre, irreverent and bitingly witty, this outlandish novel is grounded by likable characters and their raw experiences. (Science fiction. 14 & up)"
Three stories wind round one another in unexpected ways in this science-fiction offering peppered with recurring symbols. Read full book review >
THE WINNER'S CRIME by Marie Rutkoski
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 3, 2015

"Enthralling, agonizing and incandescent. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
The middle entry in a fantasy trilogy brings new players to the game while exponentially raising the stakes. Read full book review >

MADNESS IN SOLIDAR by L.E. Modesitt Jr.
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 3, 2015

"Despite the imperfections, Modesitt once again delivers an engrossing power struggle negotiated by a virtuous and talented man committed to achieving the greater good by way of the least harm."
The ninth book in the Imager series moves on some 380 years from the previous entry (Antiagon Fire, 2013).Read full book review >
OLD VENUS by George R.R. Martin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 3, 2015

"Good fun all around. Now on to Mars, Saturn, Jupiter...."
"What a world," says a character in this lively old-school sci-fi anthology. "It's like a circle in Dante's hell." Read full book review >
DEATH MARKED by Leah Cypess
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 3, 2015

"Somber and disquieting but alight with flickers of hope. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
A sorceress without magic navigates lies, treachery and despair in this thoughtful conclusion to the fantasy duology that began with Death Sworn (2014).Read full book review >
THE SUICIDE EXHIBITION by Justin Richards
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 3, 2015

"Part Indiana Jones, part X-Files, part Catch-22, it's good campy fun."
What if Hitler's inner circle, already obsessed with the occult, sought to harness the power of an alien race to help the Nazis win the war? Read full book review >
OF SILK AND STEAM by Bec McMaster
ROMANCE
Released: March 3, 2015

"The steampunk technology is fun and the characters nice and spicy, but the book requires too much suspension of disbelief to be a really good read."
A coldly powerful duchess finds herself distracted from political machinations by the mischievously handsome heir to a dukedom. Read full book review >
PRAIRIE FIRE by E.K. Johnston
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2015

"Grand, heartbreaking, ennobling and unforgettable. (Fantasy. 12-18)"
This follow-up to the acclaimed The Story of Owen (2014) is part adventure, part alternative history, part friendship story, part ecological fable and all heroic saga.Read full book review >
THE SIN EATER'S DAUGHTER by Melinda Salisbury
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A slow but satisfying read with impressive depth and emotion. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
A peasant girl transplanted to the royal court repeatedly confronts death in her new life as executioner, entertainer and bride. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >