Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 277)

OTHER NATURE by Stephanie A. Smith
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"The backdrop's an infuriating mixture of the enigmatic and the obvious, and too much happensnot always convincinglyin the last few pages; still, a smoothly handled, intriguing, sometimes unsettling drama."
First science-fiction outing for the author of Snow-Eyes, etc. (not reviewed). Read full book review >
TRAVELING WITH THE DEAD by Barbara Hambly
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Pages to read gold-stained by lamplight. (First printing of 50,000; author tour)"
Rich, stylish, turn-of-the-century vampire spy novel set in England, Paris, Vienna, Constantinople, and on the trains tying the le CarrÇ-ish spy networks together: a sequel to Hambly's memorable Those Who Hunt the Night (1988). Read full book review >

HARVEST THE FIRE by Poul Anderson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A mediocre short story whose single theme is padded out with updates, recaps, and philosophizing. (24 b&w illustrationsnot seen)"
Third in Anderson's future-history series (Harvest of Stars, 1993; The Stars Are Also Fire, 1994). Read full book review >
FOOTPRINTS OF THUNDER by James F. David
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A clever premise, but overlong and overcomplicated."
Jurassic Park gets bent through the theory of relativity in this ample first effort from Oregonian David: a time-wave fractures the laws of physics, transporting dinosaurs into the present and deranging the lives of a cast of dozens. Read full book review >
STAR ASCENDANT by Louise Cooper
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Capably crafted but insufficiently unusual to attract much notice in an already severely overcrowded scene."
First entry in a prequel fantasy trilogy or seriesanyhow, not self-containedfrom the British author of the paperback Time Master trilogy. Read full book review >

PAST IMPERATIVE by Dave Duncan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Another winnerkeep all eyestalks extended for Round Two."
First installment of a projected fantasy trilogy from the author of the splendid The Cursed (p. 350), etc. In 1914, just as WW I breaks out in Europe, young English gentleman Edward Exeter awakens in a hospital ward with a smashed leg and only scattered memories, and under police guard as a murder suspect. Read full book review >
THE DRAGON CIRCLE: DRAGON WAKING by Craig Shaw Gardner
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A meandering, adolescent, uncompelling installment, packed with incident but forming no graspable whole."
Second of Gardner's Dragon Circle yarns (Dragon Sleeping, 1994) about a suburban streetful of families suddenly transported by an ancient dragon to a fantasy world where magic works. Read full book review >
RISE OF A MERCHANT PRINCE by Raymond E. Feist
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Midkemia addicts will be accustomed to Feist's plodding, self- absorbed style and lack of true initiative, and should be content; newcomers needn't bother."
Part two of Feist's latest epic (following Shadow of a Dark Queen, 1994) set in Midkemia, the scene of his previous Riftwar saga, with certain characters making a reappearance. Read full book review >
STONE OF TEARS by Terry Goodkind
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Still, the fans will dutifully reassemble for another immersion."
This sequel to the fantasy Wizard's First Rule (1994) is, likewise, self-contained; Goodkind, however, refers constantly to characters and events of the 576-page previous volume, and offers no recap for newcomers. Read full book review >
LORDS AND LADIES by Terry Pratchett
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A so-so addition to a mostly hilarious series."
So you think elves are handsome and high-minded, or cute, cuddly, and bring good luck? Read full book review >
THE LOST WORLD by Michael Crichton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 28, 1995

"Pell-mell action and hairbreadth escapes, plus periodic commentary on the uses and abuses of science: the admirable Crichton keeps the pot boiling throughout."
Back to a Jurassic Park sideshow for another immensely entertaining adventure, this fashioned from the loose ends of Crichton's 1990 bestseller. Read full book review >
THE TOWER OF BEOWULF by Parke Godwin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"Succeeds neither as historical reconstruction nor as heroic fantasy: a tame, uncompelling, sadly mediocre enterprise."
Following an unorthodox reworking of the Robin Hood legend (Robin and the King, 1993, etc.), the versatile Godwin attempts to novelize the famous Old English poem, Beowulf, with its sixth- century setting in Denmark and southern Sweden. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >