Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 277)

MIRROR DANCE by Lois McMaster Bujold
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1994

"A well-conceived series, solidly plotted and organized, though heavy going in places and, finally, lacking that spark of genuine originality that would blazon it as truly special."
The first hardcover appearance of Bujold's well-known series about the Vorkosigan clan, hereditary rulers of planet Barrayar (Borders of Infinity, Brothers in Arms, etc.). Read full book review >
OUT OF THIS WORLD by Lawrence Watt-Evans
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Alan Dean Foster crowd."
In this first of a trilogy, Watt-Evans's hardcover debut, business consultant Pel Brown suddenly discovers he has a portal to another reality in his basement, with wizards and barbarian swordsmen popping through to ask his—and Earth's—help in fighting the evil Shadow that has conquered most of their world. Read full book review >

THE FOURTH GUARDIAN by Ronald Anthony Cross
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Tumultuous, meandering, ramshackle, heavily embroidered: often entertaining but at best only half-satisfying."
Contemporary fantasy and the beginning of a series about the Four Stones of Power, magical jewels whose actions and owners determine the fate of the world: from the author of the weird and splendid Prisoners of Paradise (1988). Read full book review >
THE MAGIC ENGINEER by Jr. Modesitt
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1994

"In sum, another uneven installment, sometimes engaging, often frustrating, with interesting inversions and sidelights; and, the worst distraction of all, set forth in an ultimately self-destructive present tense."
Third in Modesitt's series (The Magic of Recluce, 1991; The Towers of the Sunset, 1992) about the island kingdom of Recluce, and the incessant tensions between Chaos (white magic) and Order (black magic). Read full book review >
A COLLEGE OF MAGICKS by Caroline Stevermer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Stevermer has made a successful transition to adult entertainment; which, as others have discovered, is by no means as easy as it looks."
The first adult-oriented fantasy from the author of various juveniles (River Rats, 1992, etc.), set in an intriguing, not-so- different early 20th-century alternate world where magic works unobtrusively. Read full book review >

LYON'S PRIDE by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 16, 1994

"The main drawback is in telling the characters apart; even keeping their names straight is a headache. (Science Fiction Book Club Main Selection)"
Fourth in the series (Damia's Children, etc.) of far-future, galactic empire yarns in which the descendants of The Rowan— blessed with telepathic and teleportational abilities—carry on the usual multigenerational family activities while cooperating to investigate the threat posed by the Hivers, incomprehensible, expansionist, insect-like aliens utterly hostile to non-Hiver life forms. Read full book review >
A TUPOLEV TOO FAR by Brian Aldiss
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 1994

"A typically mixed bag, occasionally brilliant, often funny, always diverting."
Thirteen fairly recent pieces, including a weird alphabet and an amusing introductory poem, from the British sf/fantasy grandmaster (previous collections include A Romance of the Equator and Man in his Time). Read full book review >
THE WILD WOOD by Charles de Lint
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"Well meant but less substantial than a soap bubble. (First printing of 25,000)"
Billed as Brian Froud's Faerielands, this is the first of a series of four books by different authors on faerie-ecological themes, and inspired by Froud's artwork. Read full book review >
RAMA REVEALED by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"Still, there will be hordes of Rama fans desperate to discover how it all comes out."
Rendezvous with Rama didn't need sequels, but we got them anyway. Read full book review >
SHADOW OF THE WELL OF SOULS by Jack L. Chalker
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"While the present volume is independently intelligible (just about), it isn't complete in itself, and newcomers will do better to read Echoes first, or even return to the original saga."
Sequel to Echoes of the Well of Souls (not seen), itself a sequel to Chalker's original five-book Well World saga. Read full book review >
THE WITCH DOCTOR by Christopher Stasheff
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Otherwise, it lacks originality; furthermore, strangely, it reminds you of other writers whose names you somehow can't quite recall."
Sequel to The Oathbound Wizard (1992), about a medieval fantasy world of jousting and pageantry, where poetry holds the power of magic. Read full book review >
THE LAST BOOK OF SWORDS by Fred Saberhagen
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"But Saberhagen's series, while uneven at times, has provided tireless entertainment in the seemingly inexhaustible combination of Swords and magics, and no fan of the series will want to miss this one."
Saberhagen's Lost Swords yarns have been appearing since 1986; here, he wraps up the entire idea in fine style, by destroying the Swords one by one. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >