Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 283)

HEAVEN'S REACH by David Brin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 8, 1998

"Since Brin wrote the charming and inspiring The Postman (1985), his novels have grown ever more impenetrable and overambitious; like the rest of the trilogy, this one's hard to get into, hard to follow, and difficult to care about."
Final installment—the individual entries (Brightness Reef, 1995; Infinity's Shore, 1996) aren't particularly intelligible in their own right—of Brin's vast yarn about planet Jijo and its six alien races, all illegal immigrants living in terror of a visitation from the rulers of the Five Galaxies. Read full book review >
CHILD OF THE RIVER by Paul McAuley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 5, 1998

"Agreeably meaty and complex, challenging and tantalizing: an entry with ample scope for sequels, the one possible drawback being that McAuley's (Pasquale's Angel, 1995, etc.) narrative voice may be too cool to be entirely satisfying."
Thousands of years ago, so we eventually learn, the omnipotent and now-vanished Preservers built Confluence, not a planet but a habitat, or construct, that's home to a zillion species—"bloodlines"—whose ancestry includes both human and animal genes. Read full book review >

SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 4, 1998

"Inventive and packed with flavorsome incident, but lacking propellant: a pleasant but far from compelling saunter."
First of a fantasy trilogy, from the author of Mid-Flinx (1995), etc. The tall herdsman/warrior Etjole Ehomba of the Naumkib tribe lives by the sea. Read full book review >
FIRE ANGELS by Jane Routley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1998

"Competently set forth but pedestrian and hackneyed, with some annoyingly obvious borrowings from Tolkien (Moria, Istari, etc.) and a heroine who screams far too much."
Sequel to the mass market Mage Heart, continuing the adventures of narrator and mage Dion. Read full book review >
DAWN SONG by Michael Marano
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1998

"Read at your own risk."
Densely original, poetic, imaginative, dark-fantasy debut that treats Belial and His minions with jarring insight. Read full book review >

THIS BODY by Laurel Doud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1998

"A well-told and soulful effort."
A debut novel by a California librarian takes off from the spritely theme of postmortal switched identity, played under the comic mantle of A Midsummer Night's Dream.. Read full book review >
THE LAW OF WAR by William Shatner
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1998

"Still, it's a blend the fans seem to relish."
Second outing for grumpy fiftysomething diplomat Benton Hawkes (Man O—War, 1996), who, to his disgust, is now prime minister of Mars, a planet he hates . . . or thought he did. Read full book review >
BLACK FEATHERS by Cecilia Tan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1998

"To avoid narcosis, full hormonal participation is required."
A debut collection featuring 23 tales devoted to erotic fantasy. Read full book review >
WIT'CH FIRE by James Clemens
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1998

"And any sensible editor would've blue-penciled all those du'mb dam'n apos'trophes. (Author tour)"
Book One of a fantasy series from newcomer Clemens. Read full book review >
BHAGAVATI by Kara Dalkey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1998

"Atmospheric historical backdrop, above-average characters, rather trite plot developments: a less than fully rousing conclusion."
Final installment of Dalkey's historical fantasy trilogy (Goa, 1996; Bijapur, 1997). Read full book review >
A WIZARD IN MIDGARD by Christopher Stasheff
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1998

"Standard fare for series regulars."
Another outing for the psi-powered wizard Magnus d‘Armand (A Wizard in Chaos, 1997, etc.) and his intelligent spaceship, Herkimer. Read full book review >
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1998

"Full-body immersion for fans of the trilogy, who clearly prefer their narratives sluggish, talky, and prone to dwell on the insignificant."
Concluding volume of the trilogy (Prince of Demons and Beyond Ragnarok, not reviewed) whose backdrop is a dubious concoction of Norse gods, Celtic myth, and family saga, embroidered with standard fantasy designs. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >