Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 283)

WINTER TIDES by James P. Blaylock
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Blaylock's usual hardworking characters—but the drama never quite coheres, and the ending just dangles."
More contemporary supernatural horror from the author of All the Bells on Earth (1995), etc. When surfer Dave Quinn saved a young girl from the sea, her twin sister eluded him and drowned. Read full book review >
MARS UNDERGROUND by William K. Hartmann
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 16, 1997

"Facts and philosophizing by the ton, but tepid dramatics, a wispy plot, and no suspense at all: a ponderous workhorse of a yarn."
First novel from the Mars astronomer and author of textbooks and popularizations. Read full book review >

MY SOUL TO KEEP by Tananarive Due
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 16, 1997

"A sequel seems likely, though it may be hard to keep up the gripping originality here. ($65,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Top-flight soft-horror novel by Miami-based columnist Due (The Between, 1995). Read full book review >
WHITE WINGS by Dan Montague
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 15, 1997

"Even so, an artful, pleasant read, tailor-made for the beach, where surf and salt air can provide complementary distractions."
Sailing, seduction, and family secrets over three generations of women keep things lively for the most part in ex-priest Montague's hefty first novel, but they fall short of providing an unqualified success. Read full book review >
CHILDREN OF DARKNESS AND LIGHT by Nicholas Mosley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 15, 1997

"Reminiscent of Doris Lessing's The Four-Gated City, and a highly interesting addition to Mosley's somber studies of contemporary moral failure and looming future shock."
A disturbingly prophetic vision of a contaminated near-future from the British writer whose dense and demanding fiction include Accident (1966) and the Whitbread Award-winning Hopeful Monsters (1991). Read full book review >

ALPHA CENTAURI by William Barton
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1997

"Brilliant extrapolations and dazzling speculations obscured by nasty, grim, manipulative sexual contortions: great ideas, disagreeable dramatics."
Twenty-third-century exploration of Alpha Centauri, from the authors of Iris (1990). Read full book review >
THOUGHTS OF GOD by Michael Kanaly
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1997

"All in all, an oddball debut."
Under the Vigilante Laws, rich crime victims can pay operatives to track down and arrest criminals that elude the police. Read full book review >
GRAIL by Stephen R. Lawhead
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"For fans of the series: Lawhead's interpretation is different and distinctive, though this volume, while independently intelligible, is no place to start. (First printing of 35,000)"
Final installment of Lawhead's Pendragon cycle (Taliesin, 1987; Merlin, Arthur, Pendragon, not seen) with its roots deep in Atlantis and, here, an unexpectedly upbeat ending. Read full book review >
FREE SPACE by Brad Linaweaver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

"Worth a try: It's often engaging and chortle-provoking, even if you find politics tiresome."
An all-new anthology, comprising 17 stories and three poems, whose ``shared-future'' backdrop is inspired by Libertarian Futurist philosophy. Read full book review >
THE STILL by David Feintuch
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1997

"Anticipate sequels."
Doorstopper fantasy from the author of a paperback military science fiction series, the Seafort Saga. Read full book review >
THE ECOLITAN ENIGMA by Jr. Modesitt
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1997

"An overcomplicated but mostly agreeable potboiler from the talented and versatile Modesitt (The Soprano Sorceress, 1997, etc.)."
Field agent Nathaniel Firstborn Whaler of Accord's Ecolitan Institute, having just rescued colleague Sylvia Ferro-Maine from the Earth Empire, is ordered to produce a report detailing the ecological development and economic infrastructure of the terraformed colony world Artos. Read full book review >
DREAMING METAL by Melissa Scott
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1997

"Hard to grasp what the terrorists are all fired up about; otherwise, solid and worthy but long-winded, offering few new insights."
Scott's second yarn about planet Persephone and the development of artificial intelligence, with some of the characters recurring also. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >