Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 283)

ACORNA’S WORLD by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Cute and fluffy, not even remotely tense or gripping: a by-the-numbers, bash-the-nasty-aliens romp, breezy enough for uncritical fans of this popular duo (Power Play, 1995, etc.)."
McCaffrey continues the series (note the new collaborator: Acorna, 1997, was with Margaret Ball) about the telepathic human-alien unicorn, Acorna, a Linyaari whose horn can purify water and air and heal injuries. Read full book review >
THE FARSEEKERS by Isobelle Carmody
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Competently wrought but earnest and familiar: Put this one, along with its predecessor, on the YA shelf."
Second in Carmody's series (Obernewtyn, 1999; first published in Australia in 1987) set in a post-nuclear world ruled by the stern, repressive Council; this entry dates from 1990. Read full book review >

THE WILD ANGEL by Pat Murphy
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"1999's There and Back Again, along with her absurd chain of pseudonyms—at which news readers wary of the term 'metafiction' will probably run a mile."
Murphy's latest (by Pat Murphy "by Mary Merriwell by Max Merriwell," and just don't ask, okay?) is another wolf-girl saga (Nadya, 1996). Read full book review >
BRAIN PLAGUE by Joan Slonczewski
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"But push that difficulty to the side, and Slonczewski's fascinating, flawlessly developed, meticulously detailed scenario makes it easy to suspend disbelief."
You're playing Sim City; your sims, however, are bacteria-sized, intelligent individuals—and they're not in your computer, but physically inside your head! Read full book review >
TEMPLE OF THE WINDS by James Follett
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Whether fans will be sufficiently intrigued to stick around for further installments is hard to say."
This, the first of a projected contemporary UFO trilogy set in the UK, is Follett's first Kirkus appearance since Churchill's Gold (1981). Read full book review >

SOLDIERS LIVE: THE BLACK COMPANY by Glen Cook
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"The adventures of leader Croaker, One-Eye, Sleepy, Tobo the young sorcerer, the Lady, etc, are impossible to summarize: If you're a fan, you'll love this one; if not, you'll wonder what all the fuss is about."
Fourth (and last, we're told) of Cook's Glittering Stone yarns (Water Sleeps, 1999, etc.) about the good-guy warrior Black Company and its diverse foes, among them Narayan Singh and his apocalyptic yearnings, and the magic-powered Shadowcatcher, not to mention Longshadow, Howler, and so forth. Read full book review >
IN GREEN’S JUNGLES by Gene Wolfe
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Wolfe's narrative glows, rich and seductive as ever, but his list of 'proper names in the text' serves only as a sly reminder that you need a brain the size of a small planet to fathom what it all means."
Second part of Wolfe's latest trilogy, following On Blue's Waters (1999), which itself continues the story begun in the Book of the Long Sun tetralogy. Read full book review >
THE PERSEIDS by Robert Charles Wilson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Beautifully observed, skillfully worked out: stories that flow subtly, almost imperceptibly, from the prosaic to the preternatural."
Nine stories, 1995-2000, including three originals, from the author of Darwinia (1998), etc. The tales are related, often through the agency of a peculiar bookshop and its equally eccentric owner, but form no single or continuous narrative. Read full book review >
THE MENDELIAN THRESHOLD by Robert Humphrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"A no-brainer."
Ambitious reporter Nick Hoskins becomes curious about the work of the recently deceased British cloning expert William Smyth. Read full book review >
BALSHAZZAR’S SERPENT by Jack L. Chalker
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Elaborate scripting and stage-setting for the series to come: your move."
First volume of a new neo-pulp science fiction series, from the author of The Cybernetic Walrus (1995), etc. In the far future, planets are connected via wormholes, until suddenly—the Great Silence—half the network stops functioning, leaving hundreds of planets isolated, their economies collapsing, social systems regressing toward barbarism. Read full book review >
THE MIOCENE ARROW by Sean McMullen
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Overlong, overinvolved, and disappointing."
Sequel to McMullen's impressive far-future yarn, Souls in the Great Machine (1999). Read full book review >
THE COLLAPSIUM by Wil McCarthy
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Brilliantly, breathtakingly inventive superscience—along with sophomoric sociology and a promising plot that languishes undeveloped."
Far-future yarn involving gravity engineering, programmable matter, electromagnetic grapples, and whatnot, from the author of Bloom (1998), etc. Supergenius Bruno de Towaji now lives alone on a private planetoid in the Kuiper Belt; having engineered the Iscog, or interplanetary telecom network capable of transmitting, or "faxing," human patterns, out of collapsium, structured diamond-coated microscopic black holes, he's fabulously rich. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >