Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 283)

FOREVER PEACE by Joe Haldeman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Hardworking, often absorbing, and agreeably narrated, but the hard-to-fathom plot rubs uneasily against the chaotic and not altogether convincing backdrop."
Not a sequel to Haldeman's 1974 masterpiece, The Forever War, though the concepts and issues inevitably are similar. Read full book review >
EARTHQUAKE WEATHER by Tim Powers
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Coagulated and unengaging."
Sequel to both of Powers's previous novels, Last Call (1992) with its gambling, serial immortality, and Fisher King, and Expiration Date(1996), with its ghosts, magic, and psychiatry. Read full book review >

DRUM CALLS by Jo Clayton
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Fans of the first volume will probably find this one worth the considerable effort necessary to absorb it; outsiders may think it's time Chaos got a new drummer."
Second installment of Clayton's fantasy trilogy (Drum Warning, 1996) about the two linked worlds of Glandair and Iomard and the magical Pneuma that flows between them. Read full book review >
THE GIFT by Patrick O’Leary
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"It doesn't quite scale the loftiest pinnacles, but it's a weird, witty, often enchanting climb, boosted by the resolutely feminist subtext."
For his second outing, O'Leary moves from science fiction (Door Number Three, 1995) to this fantasy consisting of stories within stories within stories. Read full book review >
FAUN AND GAMES by Piers Anthony
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"And, meantime, in the author's afterword, you can catch up on the latest news about Anthony's teeth."
What can a hapless reviewer possibly find to say about Anthony's Xanth yarns—here the 21st of that ilk—that hasn't been said before? Read full book review >

DRIVING BLIND by Ray Bradbury
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Typically diverse, veering between sentiment and nostalgia, and set forth in the curiously mannered, modern-antique style that has become Bradbury's trademark."
Arriving too late for a full review, grandmaster Bradbury's latest collection (Quicker Than the Eye, 1996, etc.) consists of 17 new tales and 4 reprints, 197497. Read full book review >
TEMPLE OF THE WINDS by Terry Goodkind
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Another one for the fans."
Another independently intelligible doorstopper addition to Goodkind's Sword of Truth series (Blood of the Fold, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
A MIND FOR TRADE by Andre Norton
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Another solid and agreeable adventure in an unpretentiously serviceable series."
A new adventure for the Trader ship Solar Queen (Derelict for Trade, 1997, etc.), continuing the update of a series begun long ago by Norton. Read full book review >
THE CHAOS BALANCE by Jr. Modesitt
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 29, 1997

"A sturdy addition to a superior series, this time presented without narrative foibles."
Addition to Modesitt's independently intelligible fantasy series about planet Recluce and its warring Order and Chaos magic. Read full book review >
TIMEQUAKE by Kurt Vonnegut
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 22, 1997

"Nobody does it better."
Vonnegut's first "novel" in seven years (and 14th overall) might by an extremely generous extension of the term be labeled an unassuming metafiction. Read full book review >
THE BARBED COIL by J.V. Jones
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 8, 1997

"Sparkling ideas embedded in vast swathes of conventionally inflated mediocrity: Fans of the previous trilogy should feel right at home. (Author tour)"
Doorstopper new fantasy from the author of the Book of Words trilogy (Master and Fool, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
ANGEL WINGS by Nicole Conn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 1997

"Conn's (Passion's Shadow, 1995, etc.) angels are neither charming nor whimsical; their presence makes this otherwise unremarkable love story all the more convoluted."
Two angels are assigned to a case involving two humans—and trouble ensues when their styles of guardianship conflict. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >