Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 283)

INVADER by C.J. Cherryh
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 1995

"What's missing is a spark of innovation to help distinguish it from its impressive predecessor."
A sequel to the alien-contact yarn Foreigner (1994). Read full book review >
THE STEAMPUNK TRILOGY by Paul Di Filippo
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 11, 1995

"While a certain frivolity is evident, readers pleased by historical-literary games should find much to entertain them; others will find Di Filippo's debut clever and impressive, but ultimately without consequence."
Three long tales, one previously unpublished, set in the same alternate, tongue-in-cheek Victorian era and featuring mingled historical and imaginary characters, as well as a rather heavy- handed emphasis on sex. Read full book review >

ANCESTRAL HUNGERS by Scott Baker
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 1995

Baker's hardcover debut, a formidable variant on the vampire theme, is an expansion and rewrite of a 1982 paperback Dhampire. Read full book review >
THROUGH THE BREACH by David Drake
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 1995

"For the rest, Drake did the hard work of invention in volume #1, and this installment just coasts along on battles, heroics, and ideology."
Sequel to Drake's excellent hard-nosed space swashbuckler Igniting the Reaches (1994). Read full book review >
METROPOLITAN by Walter Jon Williams
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 1995

"The upshot is, by Williams's own high standards, unsatisfying."
For thousands of years, the Earth has been enclosed by an impervious Shield raised by the long-vanished Ascended Ones. Read full book review >

THE WHITE GRYPHON by Mercedes Lackey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 1995

"Newcomers to Lackey's fantasy universe are best advised to sample one of her solo novels, but the many fans who follow the series will probably find little to object to in this collaboration with husband Dixon. (12 b&w illustrations by Dixon, not seen)"
The second in a prequel trilogy set roughly a thousand years before the main action in Lackey's Heralds of Valdemar series (Storm Warning, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >
WITCHES' BREW by Terry Brooks
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 1995

"These Landover yarns are agreeable enough in their own limited fashion, and mostly manage to avoid formula; this one, after a lethargic start, comes well up to the mark."
A new adventure in Brooks's Magic Kingdom of Landover series (The Tangle Box, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
LADY OF THE TRILLIUM by Marion Zimmer Bradley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 15, 1995

"Not Bradley's most ambitious work, but a very enjoyable light fantasy that touches on more serious themes."
Bradley (The Forest House, 1994, etc.) offers a solo novel in the world of Black Trillium, a three-way collaboration with Andre Norton and Julian May featuring three princesses in a fantasy kingdom. Read full book review >
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1995

"Ingenuous head-bashing for the most part: a natural mass market title clearly out of its league in hardcover format."
The first of a new series spun off from Stasheff's paperback Warlock yarns (A Wizard in Absentia, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
PRIMARY INVERSION by Catherine Asaro
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1995

"Plenty of energy and invention, wobbly backdrop and plot."
In Asaro's far-future interstellar war, the Traders—they have a feudal social system ruled by the viciously sadistic Aristos- -square off against Skolia's Jagernauts, psi-powered space pilot/warriors, and their psi-linked cyberspace Web. Read full book review >
STRANGE ATTRACTORS by Jeffrey A. Carver
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1995

"A dazzling, thrilling, innovative space opera—a remarkable turnaround after the half-baked series opener, and probably Carver's best effort to date."
The second of Carver's independently intelligible Chaos Chronicles (Neptune Crossing, 1994) featuring surveyor John Bandicut who—aided by his superintelligent, disembodied cranial lodger, the quarx—saved the Earth from being blasted by a comet. Read full book review >
VILLAINS BY NECESSITY by Eve L. Forward
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1995

"A frothy and ingenious debut, with an agreeable, mildly humorous streak, though unsuspenseful and too long by half; should prove especially popular with the teenage fantasy-gamer crowd."
On a world unsubtly named Chiaroscuro, Good has finally extinguished Evil; those few unregenerate rascals who refuse to see the light have their attitudes permanently improved by Mizzamir, the Good Elf Wizard. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >