Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 284)

THE MOON AND THE SUN by Vonda N. McIntyre
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A dazzling and spirited evocation of the passions, intrigues, and preconceptions of the age, along with a dandy pair of misfit, star-crossed lovers: an enchanting slice of what-if historical speculation."
Historical fantasy set in 1693 at the court of Sun King Louis XIV of France, from the author of Superluminal (1983), etc. In an age when the king's slightest whim has the force of an absolute command and the underclasses stand at the palace gates pleading for bread, Louis orders the natural philosopher and Jesuit priest Yves de la Croix to capture certain sea monsters that, he hopes, will yield the secret of immortality. Read full book review >
SHE IS THE DARKNESS by Glen Cook
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Fascinating, no doubt, for the fans; all but impenetrable to outsiders."
Second book in the current trilogy (Bleak Stones, 1996), and eighth overall, about the Black Company, a band of mercenary warriors attempting to survive in a world of contending sorcerers, gods, ghosts, assassins, and whatnot. Read full book review >

THE NOTORIOUS ABBESS by Vera Chapman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Light, charming, evocative."
Twelve linked tales, 197890, only one of which, ``Crusader Damosel,'' may be familiar to fans, from an English author who- -except for a well-received Arthurian trilogy in the 1970s— published relatively little before her death this year at the age of 97. Read full book review >
THE PHYSIOGNOMY by Jeffrey Ford
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

Humorless, inflexible, drug-addicted physiognomist Cley is ordered by Drachton Below, Master of the Well-Built City, to investigate a theft in the remote mining town of Anamasobia. Read full book review >
JACK FAUST by Michael Swanwick
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"And yet the reader is constrained to ask, so what?"
What if Faust in the 16th century had been offered the knowledge available in the 20th? Read full book review >

BENEATH THE GATED SKY by Robert Reed
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Anticipate at least one more volume in the same vein."
Part sequel to, part expansion of Beyond the Veil of Stars (1994). Read full book review >
THE EAGLE'S BROOD by Jack Whyte
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"With plenty of hacking and stabbing, pontifications, dogged sex, and a few anachronistic mind-sets: another dipperful from the fertile Arthurian well, sans magic but brimful of action."
In the author's The Skystone (1996), set in the last years of the Roman occupation of fifth-century Britain, the sword Excalibur was forged, presaging the reign of King Arthur years later. Read full book review >
THE YEAR'S BEST FANTASY AND HORROR by Ellen Datlow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"There are over 40 entries here, in a collection not to be missed by anyone seriously interested in fantasy or horror."
The variety of this top-flight annual never fails to appeal, in part because it covers so much material, including, along with the best stories, obituaries of writers whose files have closed, a review of the year's best fantasy in film, television, and comic books, and summations of the year's activities in horror and fantasy. Read full book review >
RUNNING WITH THE DEMON by Terry Brooks
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"An intriguing and well-balanced scenario with believable characters, but undermined by unsurprising story developments and therefore little or no narrative tension."
New contemporary fantasy from the author of two interminable series, one about Shannara (First King of Shannara, 1996, etc.), the other set in a Magic Kingdom (Witches' Brew, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >
SLIPPAGE by Harlan Ellison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 20, 1997

"A varied and powerful collection."
``The world seems precarious to me now,'' the prodigiously productive Ellison (more than 65 books, including some 1,700 short stories) notes in his introduction to this collection of 21 previously uncollected science-fiction/fantasytinged tales, ``everything changes so fast, and no one remembers anything.'' Change is a recurrent element in these typically gruff, exuberant pieces, as is the conviction that humans possess an extraordinary range of talents and powers, few of which we thoroughly exploit. Read full book review >
THE DRAGON AND THE GNARLY KING by Gordon R. Dickson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 1997

"Agreeable and satisfying."
Another of Dickson's tongue-in-cheek medieval fantasies (The Dragon and the Djinn, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
THE GREAT WHEEL by Ian R. MacLeod
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 11, 1997

"Despite the highly unlikely extrapolation from now to then, especially the improbably secular North Africans: a thoughtful, sometimes wrenching, noteworthy debut."
By about 2170, the Endless City occupies the entire coast of North Africa; its Borderers live in poverty and squalor under a perpetual cloud generated by global warming and climate control. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >