Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 284)

LOST WORLD II by Márcio Souza
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1993

"While the subject matter might not garner a wide readership, this might be the critical success that brings Souza the recognition his style and imagination clearly deserve."
In this baroque literary farce, Brazilian author Souza (Death Squeeze, 1992—not reviewed; etc.) employs an elegant, amusing, mock 19th-century style to spin a fabulistic, academic ``sequel of sorts'' to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Lost World. Read full book review >
DOUBLE FAULT by Jack M. Bickham
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1993

"Altogether a bloated, mediocre farrago; Brad Smith isn't the first spook to look threadbare in the absence of reliable, Evil Empire KGB opposition."
Former tennis champ, Vietnam grunt, and CIA stringer Brad Smith (Breakfast at Wimbledon, 1991, etc.) finds himself harried by homicidally traumatized Vietnam combat vets. Read full book review >

THE HAMMER OF GOD by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 15, 1993

"Stretched mighty thin—despite padding with docudrama snippets—but agreeably handled and sturdily credible."
Expansion of a short story (published in a fall 1992 issue of Time magazine) about the possibility of an asteroid colliding with Earth. Read full book review >
CONFEDERACY OF THE DEAD by Richard Gilliam
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 14, 1993

"Still, the Civil War theme has built-in popularity, and the best stories here are very good indeed."
Anthology comprising 25 original entries illustrating the Civil War from a generally supernatural vantage. Read full book review >
THE ANGEL CARVER by Rosanne Daryl Thomas
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1993

"Like Walker Percy in his early novels, Thomas possesses a real gift for the lyrical and fabulous: an impressive, oddball pleasure."
Downtown meets Brooklyn, Pygmalion meets Faust, and Marilyn Monroe meets the devil—in this rollicking contemporary fairy tale by first-novelist Thomas. Read full book review >

DEERSKIN by Robin McKinley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1993

"McKinley will have to do much better than this to capture an adult audience."
A first foray into adult fantasy for the author of such well- received children's books as The Outlaws of Sherwood (1988), etc. In an unnamed, standard fantasy kingdom, an unnamed queen dies after bequeathing to her unnamed king a portrait capturing her surpassing beauty. Read full book review >
THE MOON'S WIFE by A.A. Attanasio
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 26, 1993

"Frustrating."
Surpassingly curious, dramatically uneven fiction from the author of such diverse offerings as Kingdom of the Grail (historical), Wyvern (pirates and sorcerers), and The Lost Legends of Earth (science fiction). Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 14, 1993

"Slight."
Yugoslavian writer Pavi (Dictionary of the Khazars, 1988; Landscape Painted With Tea, 1990) loves to twin his metaphors, tropes, and conceits. Read full book review >
RAINBOW MAN by M.J. Engh
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 1993

"Memorable."
Utopian tragedy, cast as an open-minded outsider's exploration of a possible, perhaps even probable, future society; by the author of Arslan and Wheel of the Winds. Read full book review >
MASTER OF EARTH AND WATER by Diana L. Paxson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 1993

"Overall, an unusually good Celtic fantasy: it's sometimes prone to bathos—Fionn often pauses in the midst of dramatic events to ponder some mundane question—but the high points of the story sing, and leave the reader with an appetite for the volumes to follow."
Paxson has carved out her niche in fantasy with recastings of Tristan and Isolde in The White Raven (1988), and King Lear in The Serpent's Tooth (1991). Read full book review >
UPLAND OUTLAWS by Dave Duncan
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: May 1, 1993

"A mediocre continuation, free of major flaws but oxidized and discouragingly slapdash."
Second installment (after the admirable The Cutting Edge) of Duncan's projected four-book fantasy. Read full book review >
THROY by Jack Vance
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 1993

"Otherwise, enjoyable but rather thin: Vance's tendency to invent brilliantly and prodigiously in the opening volume, and thereafter to lose interest, is particularly evident."
Wrapping up the far-future trilogy begun with Araminta Station and continued in Ecce and Old Earth (1992), the struggle for control over the scenically spectacular and biologically diverse planet Cadwal. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >