Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 284)

MUTAGENESIS by Helen Collins
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Admittedly, the premise is skewed, and it's far from certain whether the plot adds up; yet, despite the flaws, Collins's debut is a well-thought-out, powerful, and often devastating feminist polemic."
In the 27th century, after devastating wars, Earth is rediscovering its long-lost, far-flung star colonies. Read full book review >
THE OATHBOUND WIZARD by Christopher Stasheff
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Palatable (if unambitious) light fare, likely to be popular with the Piers Anthony crowd."
A sequel to the paperback Her Majesty's Wizard (1986) finds Stasheff in the same vein as his popular ``Warlock'' series—with a youngish hero learning the ropes of magic in a medieval fantasy kingdom. Read full book review >

DEMONS DON'T DREAM by Piers Anthony
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Series fans will find themselves right at home."
Anthony's popular fantasy series set in the world of Xanth moves into hardcover; this, entry #16, kicks off a new cycle of yarns based on interactive computer games (cf. Read full book review >
RED MARS by Kim Stanley Robinson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 15, 1993

"A pity about the overfamiliar colonization- exploitation-revolution plot cycle; still, for power, scope, depth, and detail, no other Martian epic comes close."
First of a projected trilogy about the near-future colonization of Mars, from the author of Pacific Edge, Escape from Kathmandu, etc. Robinson's Mars is realistically cold, arid, and lifeless; and even before they reach the planet, his first hundred scientist- colonists are hotly debating how Mars should be terraformed. Read full book review >
A SONG FOR ARBONNE by Guy Gavriel Kay
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 13, 1993

"Complex and compelling: one of the most impressive fantasies in a long time."
Kay's latest is very much in the vein of his well-received Tigana (1990): an exhilarating epic fantasy based loosely on medieval history. Read full book review >

TEK VENGEANCE by William Shatner
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 5, 1993

"And the upshot—cozy, comfortable, flaws and all—is the best since the series began."
A fourth case for Shatner's private detective duo, Jake Cardigan and Sid Gomez, pursuers of the evil international dealers of Tek, a mind-blowing electronic ``drug'' (Teklab, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
KILLOBYTE by Piers Anthony
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 5, 1993

"Overall, far from reassuring."
Near-future jaunt into virtual reality: that is, a computer-derived total-immersion fantasy experience—a simulation that, while it lasts, is indistinguishable from reality. Read full book review >
GOODLOW'S GHOSTS by T.M. Wright
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"The entire novel's a bit ghostly itself: eerie, but so thin you can see right through it."
Slackly plotted though occasionally spooky yarn about Boston- area ghosts—and the hardcover debut of psychic detective Ryerson Biergarten, whose cases Wright (Little Boy Lost, p. 498, etc.) has covered in several pseudonymous (``F.W. Armstrong'') paperbacks. Read full book review >
DAMIA'S CHILDREN by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Considerably more substance than hitherto, but shapeless and exasperatingly inconclusive: only series fans need apply."
McCaffrey's third far-future yarn (The Rowan, 1990; Damia, p. 577) in which powerful psychic Talents teleport cargo and people about the galaxy, while leaving themselves ample time for family doings and telepathic chat. Read full book review >
ELVISSEY by Jack Womack
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Terraplane (1988) remains his crowning achievement."
Fourth venture into Womack's bleak, violent, sterile future (Heathern, 1990, etc.) in which America is run by the Dryco Corporation, and worship of E (Elvis) is the major religion. Read full book review >
TRIUMPH by Ben Bova
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Though sometimes blurred in the fine detail (Bova has problems with British speech and idioms, for instance): a low-key, convincing what-if, stuffed with famous figures and likely to tempt WW II buffs, as well as Bova fans and sf regulars."
Intriguing speculation on a major historical turning point, from the veteran editor-writer (Mars, p. 503, etc.)—namely, what if Franklin Delano Roosevelt had lived and Josef Stalin had died? Read full book review >
THE CALL OF EARTH by Orson Scott Card
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Slow, but reasonably involving and persuasive after a virtually unintelligible first 50 pages, where readers are expected to instantly recall details from volume one."
Second in Card's science-fiction series (The Memory of Earth, p. 81) set on planet Harmony, whose ruling computer, the Oversoul, is breaking down after 40 million years' service. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >