Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 284)

FOREIGNER by C.J. Cherryh
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"These matters aside: a seriously probing, thoughtful, intelligent piece of work, with more insight in half a dozen pages than most authors manage in half a thousand."
Far-future alien-contact yarn from the author of Chanur's Legacy, The Goblin Mirror, etc., where, in a stuttering, episodic liftoff, we learn that a human colony ship, lost in space, luckily comes near a planet inhabited by humanoid "atevi." Read full book review >
THE BELLY OF THE WOLF by R.A. MacAvoy
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 25, 1994

"Quiet, unpretentious, vivid, understated, succinct: an object lesson for other, more verbose fantasists in how to produce more from less, and how to write an appealing and gratifying trilogy by offering a self-contained story each time out."
The multi-talented lensmaker Nazhuret, now living in exile in Canton with his daughter Nahvah, learns that his old friend King Rudof of Velonya is dead—perhaps murdered. Read full book review >

CHAOS MODE by Piers Anthony
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 4, 1994

"Though this episode lacks firm direction and a strong plot, the Modes notion continues to be one of Anthony's more thoughtful, hard-working, and substantial series."
Third of Anthony's Mode series (Fractal Mode, 1992)—a reality-hopping adventure combined with advice on personal growth, with an overly complicated premise but solidly agreeable character interactions. Read full book review >
THE DEUS MACHINE by Pierre Ouellette
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Fully-fleshed characters, nicely etched scenery, and a good, old-fashioned moral core—all balance the almost unbearably complex and scary cyberthrills."
Many, many microprocessors—packed together in Portland to serve the needs of a political conspiracy—start thinking independently, scaring the bejeezus out of the Pacific Northwest and bringing some order to the life of a deserted child. Read full book review >
THE IRON DRAGON'S DAUGHTER by Michael Swanwick
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Withal: enormously impressive, rich, dense, demanding."
Seething, brain-bursting, all but indescribable upper-world coming-of-age yarn, from the author of a string of splendid novels (Stations of the Tide; Griffin's Egg, etc.). Read full book review >

WORLDWAR: IN THE BALANCE by Harry Turtledove
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"WW II buffs happy to settle in for a meandering journey of unspecified duration."
Vast, churning alternate-world/alien-invasion saga. Read full book review >
THE BLACK GRYPHON by Mercedes Lackey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Should keep the fans happy but won't tempt many newcomers. (A sequel, The White Gryphon, is promised.)"
Prequel to Lackey's various fantasy series, chronologically set about a millennium before the founding of Valdemar. Read full book review >
THE VOYAGE by David Drake
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Should be a hit with the explode-a-mob audience."
A reworking of the story of Jason and the Argonauts' expedition to recover the Golden Fleece: from the author of many military sf outings (The Sharp End, p. 1170, etc.). Read full book review >
HARPY THYME by Piers Anthony
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Milkweed fluff for Xanth-happy punsters."
Another installment in Anthony's long-running Xanth fantasy series (Demons Don't Dream, 1993, etc). Read full book review >
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Miller's is marginally the more intriguing; both are fairly standard Witch World outings aimed at gratifying existing fans."
Third in the series (Flight of Vengeance, 1992, etc.) of Witch World yarns set in the aftermath of a world-shaking battle, The Turning. Read full book review >
THE GLASS MOUNTAIN by Leonard Wolf
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 17, 1993

"Wolf's ease with the genre (which allows us to savor his crisp reenactment of stock fairy-tale scenes) falls short of an ability to integrate its ancient symbols with the angst of his alienated royals."
The Polish fairy tale ``The Glass Mountain'' appeared in Lang's The Yellow Fairy Book (1894) and more recently was given a mordant urban twist by Donald Barthelme in a short 1970 piece (same title). Read full book review >
PARABLE OF THE SOWER by Octavia E. Butler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 8, 1993

"A vanishingly thin plot and dreadfully preachy: imperfections for which Butler's usual virtues—lucid prose, a realistic progression of events, and splendid texture—unfortunately fail to compensate."
Diary of teenager Lauren Olamina, 2024-27, as she struggles to survive the collapse of civilization and formulate a new religion that spells out her notion of God as change: from the author of Clay's Ark, the Xenogenesis series, etc. Only walled enclaves like Robledo, California, stand against total descent into barbarism, criminality, and madness; even so, one by one the enclaves are being overrun by drug-crazed ``Paints.'' Olamina's younger brother Keith, tiring of his father's strictures and determined to make a life for himself outside, runs away, to live by robbery, murder, and drug-dealing—and quickly ends up horribly dead. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jodi Picoult and Samantha van Leer
authors of OFF THE PAGE
May 19, 2015

Meet Oliver, a prince literally taken from the pages of a fairy tale and transported into the real world. Meet Delilah, the girl who wished Oliver into being. In bestseller Jodi Picoult and her daughter Samantha van Leer’s new young adult novel, Off the Page, it’s a miracle that seems perfect at first—but there are complications. To exist in Delilah’s world, Oliver must take the place of a regular boy. Enter Edgar, who agrees to play Oliver’s role in the pages of Delilah’s favorite book. But just when it seems that the plan will work, everything gets turned upside down. We talk to the mother-daughter team on Kirkus TV. View video >