Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 284)

DOUBLE FAULT by Jack M. Bickham
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1993

"Altogether a bloated, mediocre farrago; Brad Smith isn't the first spook to look threadbare in the absence of reliable, Evil Empire KGB opposition."
Former tennis champ, Vietnam grunt, and CIA stringer Brad Smith (Breakfast at Wimbledon, 1991, etc.) finds himself harried by homicidally traumatized Vietnam combat vets. Read full book review >
THE HAMMER OF GOD by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 15, 1993

"Stretched mighty thin—despite padding with docudrama snippets—but agreeably handled and sturdily credible."
Expansion of a short story (published in a fall 1992 issue of Time magazine) about the possibility of an asteroid colliding with Earth. Read full book review >

CONFEDERACY OF THE DEAD by Richard Gilliam
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 14, 1993

"Still, the Civil War theme has built-in popularity, and the best stories here are very good indeed."
Anthology comprising 25 original entries illustrating the Civil War from a generally supernatural vantage. Read full book review >
THE ANGEL CARVER by Rosanne Daryl Thomas
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1993

"Like Walker Percy in his early novels, Thomas possesses a real gift for the lyrical and fabulous: an impressive, oddball pleasure."
Downtown meets Brooklyn, Pygmalion meets Faust, and Marilyn Monroe meets the devil—in this rollicking contemporary fairy tale by first-novelist Thomas. Read full book review >
DEERSKIN by Robin McKinley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1993

"McKinley will have to do much better than this to capture an adult audience."
A first foray into adult fantasy for the author of such well- received children's books as The Outlaws of Sherwood (1988), etc. In an unnamed, standard fantasy kingdom, an unnamed queen dies after bequeathing to her unnamed king a portrait capturing her surpassing beauty. Read full book review >

THE MOON'S WIFE by A.A. Attanasio
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 26, 1993

"Frustrating."
Surpassingly curious, dramatically uneven fiction from the author of such diverse offerings as Kingdom of the Grail (historical), Wyvern (pirates and sorcerers), and The Lost Legends of Earth (science fiction). Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 14, 1993

"Slight."
Yugoslavian writer Pavi (Dictionary of the Khazars, 1988; Landscape Painted With Tea, 1990) loves to twin his metaphors, tropes, and conceits. Read full book review >
RAINBOW MAN by M.J. Engh
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 1993

"Memorable."
Utopian tragedy, cast as an open-minded outsider's exploration of a possible, perhaps even probable, future society; by the author of Arslan and Wheel of the Winds. Read full book review >
MASTER OF EARTH AND WATER by Diana L. Paxson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 1993

"Overall, an unusually good Celtic fantasy: it's sometimes prone to bathos—Fionn often pauses in the midst of dramatic events to ponder some mundane question—but the high points of the story sing, and leave the reader with an appetite for the volumes to follow."
Paxson has carved out her niche in fantasy with recastings of Tristan and Isolde in The White Raven (1988), and King Lear in The Serpent's Tooth (1991). Read full book review >
UPLAND OUTLAWS by Dave Duncan
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: May 1, 1993

"A mediocre continuation, free of major flaws but oxidized and discouragingly slapdash."
Second installment (after the admirable The Cutting Edge) of Duncan's projected four-book fantasy. Read full book review >
THROY by Jack Vance
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 1993

"Otherwise, enjoyable but rather thin: Vance's tendency to invent brilliantly and prodigiously in the opening volume, and thereafter to lose interest, is particularly evident."
Wrapping up the far-future trilogy begun with Araminta Station and continued in Ecce and Old Earth (1992), the struggle for control over the scenically spectacular and biologically diverse planet Cadwal. Read full book review >
CHALLENGES by Ben Bova
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1993

"Worthwhile, especially for the essays and the various indications of Bova's own editorial thought processes—he has been no small influence himself."
Twelve tales and six essays, 1962-92, including three previously unpublished stories, each piece illuminated by an extensive, and often broadly autobiographical, introduction. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >