Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 284)

THE WITCH DOCTOR by Christopher Stasheff
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Otherwise, it lacks originality; furthermore, strangely, it reminds you of other writers whose names you somehow can't quite recall."
Sequel to The Oathbound Wizard (1992), about a medieval fantasy world of jousting and pageantry, where poetry holds the power of magic. Read full book review >
THE LAST BOOK OF SWORDS by Fred Saberhagen
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"But Saberhagen's series, while uneven at times, has provided tireless entertainment in the seemingly inexhaustible combination of Swords and magics, and no fan of the series will want to miss this one."
Saberhagen's Lost Swords yarns have been appearing since 1986; here, he wraps up the entire idea in fine style, by destroying the Swords one by one. Read full book review >

CURSE OF THE MISTWRAITH by Janny Wurts
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A tremendous amount of hard work but no signs of genuine talent, composed of gnarled writing, a farrago of plot elements, and ideas no better than mediocre retreads."
Wurts, coauthor (with Raymond E. Feist) of Mistress of the Empire (1992), etc., embarks on a massively ambitious five-book sword-and-sorcery epic involving good and evil, light and dark, and two warring half-brothers. Read full book review >
LARQUE ON THE WING by Nancy Springer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Charming, eccentric work where the bright, playful narrative enfolds a thoughtful and significant interior: irresistible."
Springer continues the marked improvement she showed in Apocalypse (1989) with this winning, precisely rendered foray into magic realism. Read full book review >
THE EMPIRE OF ICE by Richard Moran
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Stock characters and clunkily-handled science put a freeze on suspense and excitement here: a derivative end-of-worlder."
An active volcano emerges from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, threatening to plunge the British Isles into a new Ice Age: a plot- heavy disaster thriller from Moran (Cold Sea Rising, 1986; Dallas Down, 1988). Read full book review >

FINDER by Emma Bull
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Despite the unnecessary last 50 pages: a refreshing, ingenious hardcover debut."
Elfland has returned, magically inserting itself into modern America; in the buffer zone between the two, Bordertown, where magic works alongside electricity and gas supplies, congregate misfits and refugees from both our reality and Elfland. Read full book review >
ORION AND THE CONQUEROR by Ben Bova
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"An odd but effective combination of far- out fantasy trappings with solid historical foundations—much more persuasive and appealing than Orion's previous airing."
Another in Bova's fantasy potboilers (Orion in the Dying Time, etc.) about the immortal android warrior Orion, the Creators who made him, and the evil opposition intent on destroying both Creators and humanity. Read full book review >
THE SHIPS OF EARTH by Orson Scott Card
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"The Homecoming Saga is a well-turned series, with intriguing ideas, well-developed characters and setting, and a plot huge enough to satisfy the most extravagant tastes; this episode comes with a most useful and welcome recapping prologue, although newcomers will wish to start with volume one."
Third in Card's sf series (The Call of Earth, 1992, etc.) set on planet Harmony, whose ruling computer, the Oversoul, is breaking down after 40 million years of service. Read full book review >
FOREIGNER by C.J. Cherryh
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"These matters aside: a seriously probing, thoughtful, intelligent piece of work, with more insight in half a dozen pages than most authors manage in half a thousand."
Far-future alien-contact yarn from the author of Chanur's Legacy, The Goblin Mirror, etc., where, in a stuttering, episodic liftoff, we learn that a human colony ship, lost in space, luckily comes near a planet inhabited by humanoid "atevi." Read full book review >
THE BELLY OF THE WOLF by R.A. MacAvoy
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 25, 1994

"Quiet, unpretentious, vivid, understated, succinct: an object lesson for other, more verbose fantasists in how to produce more from less, and how to write an appealing and gratifying trilogy by offering a self-contained story each time out."
The multi-talented lensmaker Nazhuret, now living in exile in Canton with his daughter Nahvah, learns that his old friend King Rudof of Velonya is dead—perhaps murdered. Read full book review >
CHAOS MODE by Piers Anthony
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 4, 1994

"Though this episode lacks firm direction and a strong plot, the Modes notion continues to be one of Anthony's more thoughtful, hard-working, and substantial series."
Third of Anthony's Mode series (Fractal Mode, 1992)—a reality-hopping adventure combined with advice on personal growth, with an overly complicated premise but solidly agreeable character interactions. Read full book review >
THE DEUS MACHINE by Pierre Ouellette
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Fully-fleshed characters, nicely etched scenery, and a good, old-fashioned moral core—all balance the almost unbearably complex and scary cyberthrills."
Many, many microprocessors—packed together in Portland to serve the needs of a political conspiracy—start thinking independently, scaring the bejeezus out of the Pacific Northwest and bringing some order to the life of a deserted child. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >