Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 284)

WATER SLEEPS by Glen Cook
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 10, 1999

"Tough, gritty gloom-and-doom that should entertain the fans while remaining impenetrable to outsiders."
This outing for the Black Company—either the eighth or the ninth, depending on how you count—completes the Glittering Stone trilogy (She is the Darkness, 1997; Bleak Seasons, 1996). Read full book review >
THE JACKAL OF NAR by John Marco
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 9, 1999

"An absorbing, deftly plotted, forgivably overlong debut with promising character developments and a well-rounded, satisfying end."
Jumbo fantasy, the first of a series entitled Tyrants and Kings, from newcomer Marco. Read full book review >

DOUBLE FULL MOON LIGHT by Gentry Lee
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 9, 1999

"Neither the desultory plot nor the plodding prose generates much narrative tension: imaginative, sometimes, but this unengaging space odyssey's mostly just pointless."
Lee's sequel to Bright Messengers (1995) comes with a solid synopsis: eight years previously, engineer Johann Eberhardt, some Martian colonists, and a number of saintly Michaelite nuns, previously tantalized by particle-ribbon beings that the nuns regard as angels, entered a strange spacecraft and were whisked off into the unknown. Read full book review >
A BOY AND HIS TANK by Leo Frankowski
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1999

"Despite the high-tech whiz-bangs and extended history lesson, a deflating variant on the 'he fell out of bed and woke up' scenario: competently wrought but rather YA-ish, with teenagers the likely target audience."
By the 22nd century, the Wealthy Nations Group relieves overpopulation by persuading ethnic or religious minority groups to colonize planets of their own. Read full book review >
DRAGONSHADOW by Barbara Hambly
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1999

"Beautifully concise, adroitly plotted, inventive, and insightful: a wrenching affair that works its barbed pleasures ever deeper into the enthralled, horrified reader."
From the author of Icefalcon's Quest (1998), among others, a sequel to Dragonsbane. Read full book review >

THE DEMON APOSTLE by R.A. Salvatore
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1999

"A solid conclusion to this popular trilogy, even though, disappointingly, Salvatore chooses a trite and rather obvious method of setting up yet more sequels. (Author tour)"
Third part of Salvatore's trilogy following The Demon Awakens (1997) and The Demon Spirit (1998). Read full book review >
NOT EXACTLY THE THREE MUSKETEERS by Joel Rosenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 9, 1999

"A graphically, sometimes nauseatingly detailed gut-ripper with a carefully crafted backdrop, a picaresque but otherwise rudimentary plot, and few attempts at originality: should please Flame fans."
the three vaguely resemble Dumas's immortal trio in that they value honor above all: dim-witted redhead Kethol gambles and likes to rescue damsels in distress; huge swordsman Durine prefers to seek out whores; ugly Pirojil likes his beer. Read full book review >
A CLASH OF KINGS by George R.R. Martin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 9, 1999

"And since this one tips the scales at a gargantuan 896 pages, you can build up your biceps as you read."
Second installment of Martin's fantasy —A Song of Ice and Fire,— following A Game of Thrones (1996), that enormous yarn about the strife-torn Seven Kingdoms and the various powerful families that aspire to rule them. Read full book review >
STEP INTO CHAOS by William Shatner
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Gripping, scientifically lucid space adventure, told in a terse, snazzy style with plenty of cliff-hanging incidents: overall, much the best of the various series (Star Treks; the sleuthing Tek yarns; the grumpy-but-lovable diplomat Benton Hawkes novels) appearing under the Shatner letterhead."
Third in the Quest for Tomorrow novels (In Alien Hands, 1997) and, logically, a wrap, though the publishers continue to bill it as a series. Read full book review >
MINIONS OF THE MOON by Richard Bowes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"More promising than successful, with its many thinly dramatized characters all but demanding a scorecard to be kept straight."
Strange, symbolic first novel about addiction and a gay antique-toys dealer with a very substantial alter ego. Read full book review >
NIMISHA'S SHIP by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Might just about satisfy McCaffrey's least critical fans."
New, independent sf from McCaffrey (Freedom's Challenge, 1998, etc.) Read full book review >
DOG EAT DOG by Jerry Jay Carroll
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"An amusing, featherweight spoof of sex-and-money political novels, with good triumphing only because evil has its price."
A whimsical sequel to Carroll's Top Dog (1996) pits reformed greenmailer (and diehard dog lover) Bogey Ingersoll against satanic plotters who want to elect a malevolent billionaire to the Presidency. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >