Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 284)

AFTERMATH by Charles Sheffield
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 10, 1998

"Professionally handled and ingeniously extrapolated, and with engrossing plot elements, this entry is complete in itself but clearly anticipates sequels."
Big, bustling post-disaster yarn from the author of Tomorrow and Tomorrow (1997), etc. In 2026, our nearest stellar neighbor, Alpha Centauri, goes supernova; the heat generated by this colossal explosion scorches the Earth's southern hemisphere and distorts climate worldwide. Read full book review >
HEARTFIRE by Orson Scott Card
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 7, 1998

"One more absorbing entry in this brilliantly conceived and fetchingly rendered series."
Another in Card's superior fantasy series about Alvin Smith (Alvin Journeymen, 1995, etc.), set in an alternate world where magic works—people are born with "knacks"—and America is divided among a tiny Union, various European colonies, and inviolable Red territory west of the Mizzipy River. Read full book review >

DEEPDRIVE by Alexander Jablokov
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 5, 1998

"Astonishing, hypercomplicated, semi-surreal, with a hatful of ingeniously realized aliens shimmering beneath a delightfully sustained aura of black-comic paranoia."
In Jablokov's (Nimbus, 1993, etc.) far-future, numerous alien species with their starspanning "deepdrives" are active in the solar system; humankind, lacking any deepdrive of its own, schemes desperately to acquire one. Read full book review >
FULL TIDE OF NIGHT by J.R. Dunn
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Intelligent, well organized, often gripping, but with the backdrop and plot all too obviously distorted to accommodate Dunn's dialectic: impressive, sure, but not entirely convincing."
Far-future politico-philosophical showdown from the author of the stunning time travel novel Days of Cain (1997), etc. The mysterious, deadly, and irresistible Erinye—masters of artificial intelligence and VR—conquered the solar system, destroying everything they perceived as a threat; only one person, Julia "Jay" Amalfi, and her companion, Cary, an immature artificial intelligence, fled in a starship to the glaciated planet Midgard. Read full book review >
SWORDS AGAINST THE SHADOWLAND by Robin Wayne Bailey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Just don—t let Norman (—evil stuff—) Spinrad catch you."
Inspired by his friend Harry Fischer, fantasist extraordinary Fritz Leiber (1910—92) wrote the first tale about Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser, —Two Sought Adventure,— in 1939. Read full book review >

THE TEMPLE AND THE STONE by Katherine Kurtz
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"A skillful and involving blend of real history, speculation, and elements of controlled, credible fantasy."
Following the recent volume of Knights Templar stories (On Crusade, 1998, edited by Kurtz), here's a Templar novel from this established collaboration team (Death of an Adept, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
HEROES DIE by Matthew Woodring Stover
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Stover does, however, work hard to develop his characters. (Author tour)"
Dubious sf/fantasy hybrid from the author of the paperback Iron Dawn. Read full book review >
ACCIDENTAL CREATURES by Anne Harris
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"A well-worked-out, confidently handled drama, but lacking the freshness and flair that made Harris's debut (The Nature of Smoke, 1996) such an eye-opener."
With the collapse of the motor industry, the car plants of Detroit became GeneSys's Vattown; here, vatdivers harvest valuable biopolymers from huge vats but are forced to work in diving suits that protect them from the vats' lethal growth medium. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"A strange and beautiful book that offers an unusual depth and nuance of character, set forth in lustrous dialogue and prose the texture of honeyed silk."
Sequel to Beneath the Vaulted Hills (not reviewed), or, better, the second half of a doorstopper entitled The River into Darkness. Read full book review >
MOCKINGBIRD by Sean Stewart
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Knotty, unsparing, and impressively wrought, but what it all means is anyone's guess."
Contemporary metaphorical fantasy from the author of Night Watch (1997). Read full book review >
A KNIGHT OF THE WORD by Terry Brooks
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Unevocative, humdrum, and devoid of narrative tension; still, fans of the previous book will probably want to investigate."
Relatively uncompelling sequel to Running with the Demon (1997), Brooks's good (the Word) vs. evil (the Void) clash set in contemporary America. Read full book review >
QUEST FOR THE FALLEN STAR by Piers Anthony
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 27, 1998

"Pleasant."
Boilerplate fantasy, of which a substantially different version was written originally by Richey, rewritten by Anthony's researcher Riggs, and finally tweaked and buffed by Anthony. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >