Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 288)

JACK FAUST by Michael Swanwick
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"And yet the reader is constrained to ask, so what?"
What if Faust in the 16th century had been offered the knowledge available in the 20th? Read full book review >
BENEATH THE GATED SKY by Robert Reed
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Anticipate at least one more volume in the same vein."
Part sequel to, part expansion of Beyond the Veil of Stars (1994). Read full book review >

THE EAGLE'S BROOD by Jack Whyte
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"With plenty of hacking and stabbing, pontifications, dogged sex, and a few anachronistic mind-sets: another dipperful from the fertile Arthurian well, sans magic but brimful of action."
In the author's The Skystone (1996), set in the last years of the Roman occupation of fifth-century Britain, the sword Excalibur was forged, presaging the reign of King Arthur years later. Read full book review >
THE YEAR'S BEST FANTASY AND HORROR by Ellen Datlow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"There are over 40 entries here, in a collection not to be missed by anyone seriously interested in fantasy or horror."
The variety of this top-flight annual never fails to appeal, in part because it covers so much material, including, along with the best stories, obituaries of writers whose files have closed, a review of the year's best fantasy in film, television, and comic books, and summations of the year's activities in horror and fantasy. Read full book review >
RUNNING WITH THE DEMON by Terry Brooks
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"An intriguing and well-balanced scenario with believable characters, but undermined by unsurprising story developments and therefore little or no narrative tension."
New contemporary fantasy from the author of two interminable series, one about Shannara (First King of Shannara, 1996, etc.), the other set in a Magic Kingdom (Witches' Brew, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >

SLIPPAGE by Harlan Ellison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 20, 1997

"A varied and powerful collection."
``The world seems precarious to me now,'' the prodigiously productive Ellison (more than 65 books, including some 1,700 short stories) notes in his introduction to this collection of 21 previously uncollected science-fiction/fantasytinged tales, ``everything changes so fast, and no one remembers anything.'' Change is a recurrent element in these typically gruff, exuberant pieces, as is the conviction that humans possess an extraordinary range of talents and powers, few of which we thoroughly exploit. Read full book review >
THE DRAGON AND THE GNARLY KING by Gordon R. Dickson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 1997

"Agreeable and satisfying."
Another of Dickson's tongue-in-cheek medieval fantasies (The Dragon and the Djinn, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
THE GREAT WHEEL by Ian R. MacLeod
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 11, 1997

"Despite the highly unlikely extrapolation from now to then, especially the improbably secular North Africans: a thoughtful, sometimes wrenching, noteworthy debut."
By about 2170, the Endless City occupies the entire coast of North Africa; its Borderers live in poverty and squalor under a perpetual cloud generated by global warming and climate control. Read full book review >
THE WHITE TRIBUNAL by Paula Volsky
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 11, 1997

"Skimpy backdrop, thin plot, and characters by the numbers, not to mention the dreadfully feeble conclusion: some graphic tortures but otherwise unpersuasive."
In Volsky's new fantasy (The Gates of Twilight, 1996, etc.), the city of Lis Folaze in Upper Hetzia is slowly recovering from the Sortilegious Wars (though we never find out what these involved). Read full book review >
WAR OF THREE WATERS by Douglas Niles
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"An agreeable conclusion for fans of the series."
Final volume (Darkenheight, 1996; A Breach in the Watershed, 1995) about the struggle between good-guys mundane Dalethica and magic Faerine against Duloth-Trol and its evil god Dassadec. Read full book review >
GIANT BONES by Peter S. Beagle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"A treat for browsers and Beagle aficionados alike."
Beagle writes in his foreword that he doesn't do sequels; nevertheless, the world he created in The Innkeeper's Song (1993) continues to tickle his storytelling instincts: hence, the setting for this collection of six substantial tales, though only one, ``Lal and Soukyan,'' features characters from the novel. Read full book review >
BERSERKER FURY by Fred Saberhagen
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Plenty of well-orchestrated maneuvers and action, not too much subtlety: This reliable formula should please the many berserker devotees."
An addition to Saberhagen's long-standing series about the berserkers (Berserker Kill, 1993, etc.), smart machines whose programming directs them to roam the galaxy seeking out and destroying organic life—and especially ``badlife,'' those beings who attempt to resist extermination. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >