Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 288)

THE WILD ROAD by Gabriel King
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1998

"Still, definitely deserving a look by fantasy-ailurophiles."
Young gray kitten Tag lives an easy housebound life with his ``dulls'' (people) until he's tempted to dash outside, where, distracted by a magpie, a fox, and a mysterious old one-eyed black cat named Majicou, he gets lost and must adopt the precarious life of a stray on east London's hard streets. Read full book review >
KIRINYAGA by Mike Resnick
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1998

"But problems remain, such as the traditional status of Kikuyu women, whose lot is unremitting toil, enforced ignorance, and genital mutilation."
Another African saga from Resnick (A Miracle of Rare Design, 1994, etc.) comprising nine linked stores (all have appeared before; several have won major awards) about Kirinyaga, the spiritual homeland of Kenya's Kikuyu people. Read full book review >

VIRUS CLANS by Michael Kanaly
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1998

"A single unconvincing, hopelessly overextended idea, reminiscent of Greg Bear's Blood Music (1985) and, likewise, completely undramatizable: a schizophrenic washout."
More near-future sf from the author of Thoughts of God (1997). Read full book review >
HAND OF PROPHECY by Severna Park
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1998

"A roaring, clanking bulldozer of a yarn: does the job with its blade, despite the fumes and noise."
Far-future struggle against slavery, from the author of the mass market Speaking Dreams. Read full book review >
BETWEEN THE RIVERS by Harry Turtledove
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1998

"Historically intriguing, splendidly textured, and full of stimulating ideas, though with two persistent flaws: remarkably stupid gods with no plausible motivations; and Turtledove's habitually vapid characters."
Another alternate-world yarn from an author who specializes in historical might-have-beens (How Few Remain, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >

MOONWAR by Ben Bova
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1998

"Rousing, inventive, persuasively knotty, with loads of tension and excitement: overall, far more involving and gripping than the previous volume."
Having done all the stage-setting for his near/medium-future lunar saga in Moonrise (1996), Bova slams right into the action in this declaration-of-independence sequel. Read full book review >
THE BOOK OF KNIGHTS by Yves Meynard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 25, 1998

"Mildly entertaining, with incidents reminiscent of highly diluted Jack Vance, but otherwise undistinguished."
First English-language fantasy from a Canadian author who hitherto has written in French. Read full book review >
THE TOOTH FAIRY by Graham Joyce
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 20, 1998

"Sharp, freshly imagined, and evocative work, by turns wrenching, funny, and disquieting."
From the author of Requiem (1996): a story about a boy growing up in England in the 1960s—with one singular difference: He's haunted by a demonic Tooth Fairy that only he can see, but whose effects spill over into his family and friends. Read full book review >
DINOSAUR SUMMER by Greg Bear
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 17, 1998

"Amiable, sometimes stirring incident-packed baloney: a yarn that screams I wanna be a movie!"
Fantasy built on a fantasy—in Bear's alternative 1947, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World wasn't fiction, but fact!—mingling real and imaginary characters with a quite unbelievable hodgepodge of defiantly unextinct beasties from the Carboniferous on up. Read full book review >
EMPIRE OF THE ANTS by Bernard Werber
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 9, 1998

"A tour de force."
Empire Of The Ants ($23.95; Feb. 9; 256 pp.; 0-553-09613-3): First published in France in 1991, this ingenious anthropomorphic fantasy draws disturbing parallels between the rigidly structured ``empire'' in which ants work, multiply, make war, and survive and the less ordered lives of their most dangerous predators: human beings. Read full book review >
PRINCE OF DOGS by Kate Elliott
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"A solidly engrossing addition to a worthwhile series."
Second entry in Elliott's doorstopper fantasy series (King's Dragon, Feb. 1997) set in the old/medieval-Europeflavored kingdom of Wendar. Read full book review >
IN THE GARDEN OF IDEN by Kage Baker
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Set it forth in a narrative that sparkles with wit: The upshot is a highly impressive and thoroughly engrossing debut."
The ubiquitous Company is Dr. Zeus, Incorporated; by the year 2335, it owns nearly everything. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >