Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 288)

ENCHANTER by Sara Douglass
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"So Douglass holds her own as her characters deepen inventively."
Second installment in The Wayfarer Redemption series begun with Battleaxe (2001), by Australian fantasist Douglass, whose third volume, Starman, and three others are already available from HarperCollins of Australia. Read full book review >
THE SAVAGE GIRL by Alex Shakar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"With the crafty-eyed precision of Don DeLillo and the humor of Neal Stephenson, a world where image is life and the Next Big Thing is a mouse-click away."
A bitterly funny broadside on market-driven contemporary life. Read full book review >

MISTRESS OF THE CATACOMBS by David Drake
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Drake's many fans doubtless will look eastward for the sunrise of volume five."
Volume four in Drake's generic fantasy on future wizardry (Lord of the Isles, Queen of Demons, and 1999's Servant of the Dragon), which fast approaches the length of In Search of Lost Time while presenting somewhat more of a struggle for adults to read. Read full book review >
MOTHER OF KINGS by Poul Anderson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Still, a worthy effort through it all."
A ponderous, meandering, but unquestionably great work. Read full book review >
ASHLING by Isobelle Carmody
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Told in sober, clear printspeak, a splinter tongue of strokekey."
Concluding volume of the Obernewtyn Chronicles, first published (by Viking Penguin) in 1995 in Australia. Read full book review >

FROM THE DUST RETURNED by Ray Bradbury
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"A far cry from the great early stories, but filled with a nostalgic charm that vitiates Bradbury's notorious rhetorical laxness and sentimentality. One of his most attractive and satisfying works in quite some time."
At last—a book you can judge by its cover. For this one sports a wonderfully macabre illustration born of Charles Addams's brief collaboration with master fantasist Bradbury, best known for such classic fiction as The Martian Chronicles (1950) and Fahrenheit 451 (1953). Read full book review >
PYRAMID SCHEME by David Freer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Swift and engrossing fun, the unresolved philosophical mystery smacking of Stanislaw Lem."
Freer (The Forlorn, 1999) and Flint (1632, 2000) join to describe what happens when a small alien probe called a Krim travels 2740 light-years through a wormhole and lands in the Regenstein Library of the University of Chicago. Read full book review >
MARTIAN KNIGHTLIFE by James P. Hogan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Pleasant but featherweight, and a pretty thin stretch even at this modest length."
In the tradition of Leslie Charteris's Saint and Jack Vance's Magnus Ridolph, etc., two long interconnected stories featuring Kieran "Knight" Thane, a medium-future knight errant who rights wrongs, cons the conmen and swindles the swindlers while bolstering his personal retirement fund: from the author of The Legend That Was Earth (2000), etc. In the first adventure, Kieran arrives on Mars after wandering the solar system and meets up with his longtime friend June Holland. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"LookingglassssalggnikooL pleasuresserusaelp."
Brightly conceived, even though the most widely known alternative history tale of modern times is ignored, James Cameron's Terminator II. Read full book review >
ANGELMASS by Timothy Zahn
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Once underway, immensely appealing."
Though the jacket showing a monstrous drill cracking apart huge space-rocks blasts at us like an old Amazing Stories cover, this black-hole saga, by the hugely bestselling author of Star Wars: Heir to the Empire (1991), turns on systems of interplanetary ethics, with every page scrubbed for younger readers who may have a legal bent taming their hormonal drives. Read full book review >
THE PRECIPICE by Ben Bova
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Spaceworthy nuts-and-bolts, tense action, intriguing plots, and a thoroughly nasty villain: perhaps the most impressive entry yet in this reliable and increasingly significant series."
Addition to Bova's near/medium-future series about the exploration and exploitation of the solar system (Venus, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >
EYES OF THE CALCULOR by Sean McMullen
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Beamflash to North American SF fans: Australia Forwarding Huge Fun by Moonwing."
Librarians still rule the world in volume three of the Australian McMullen's Greatwinter trilogy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >