Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 288)

FOUNDATION'S FEAR by Gregory Benford
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1997

"Sometimes needlessly and annoyingly meddlesome, but yet another curious blend of reinventions and retrospective criticism, intriguing and engrossing when Benford extends and embellishes Asimov's vision."
Benford's previous output includes a sequel to a story written by Arthur C. Clarke (Beyond the Fall of Night, 1990). Read full book review >
FREEDOM AND NECESSITY by Steven Brust
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"Very difficult to approach, top-heavy with philosophizing, and not particularly rewarding—although characterizing it as a humdrum Victorian adventure is, ironically enough, some measure of the author's success."
Victorian sleuthing, though billed as fantasy, from Brust (Five Hundred Years Later, 1994, etc.) and Bull (Finder, 1994). Read full book review >

GLIMMERING by Elizabeth Hand
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1997

"Flashy and downbeat, a sort of pre-post-cyberpunk as depressing as it is pointless."
Fin-de-siäcle/apocalyptic yarn from the author of Waking the Moon (1995), etc. Earth's atmosphere, destroyed by pollution and ozone depletion, coruscates with bizarrely colorful discharges, banishing night and hiding the stars. Read full book review >
THE SOPRANO SORCERESS by Jr. Modesitt
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 10, 1997

"Sequels are supererogatory; the publishers threaten them nonetheless."
A new fantasy from the versatile author of Adiamante (p. 1108), the Recluce series, etc. Here, blond, middle-aged soprano Anna Marshall finds herself whirled away from everyday Ames, Iowa, to another world in which the country of Defalk is threatened with invasion by evil Dark Monks from neighboring Ebra. Read full book review >
LIVES OF THE MONSTER DOGS by Kirsten Bakis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Serious enough, but also funny and imaginative: a vivid parable that manages to amuse even as it perplexes and intrigues."
New York is colonized by giant talking canines in newcomer Bakis's wry variation on the traditional shaggy dog story. Read full book review >

EXCESSION by Iain M. Banks
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Not Invented Here and Shoot Them Later) don't compensate for the absence of real characters."
From versatile Scottish writer Banks, another sf yarn about the tolerant, diverse, far-future Culture (The Player of Games, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
THE SEER KING by Chris Bunch
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"The text, while complete in itself, seems to promise at least one sequel."
Military sword and sorcery, from the co-author of Kingdoms of the Night (with Allan Cole, 1995, etc.) Read full book review >
SONG IN THE SILENCE by Elizabeth Kerner
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Expect sequels."
In Kolmar, tall young horse-farmer Lanen Kaelar dreams of meeting the True Dragons of the remote West. Read full book review >
DRAGONSEYE by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Comfortably cozy and domestic: an undramatic but meticulously detailed entry that should satisfy most dragonfans."
Another visit to planet Pern (The Dolphins of Pern, 1994, etc.), home of the famous Dragonriders, who—mounted on their genetically engineered, flying native dragons (with whom they form a mental bond)—battle the deadly corrosive lifeform known as Thread that periodically threatens the planet. Read full book review >
FABULOUS HARBORS by Michael Moorcock
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Spellbinding, maybe, or rootless and irrelevant, depending on whether you buy Moorcock's anything-goes, game-playing scenario."
Eleven loosely interconnected tales, 196695—nine reprints and two originals, all featuring more-or-less familiar Moorcock characters—that form a bridge between Blood (1995) and a projected third volume. Read full book review >
THE SHIP AVENGED by S.M. Stirling
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Pretty good ersatz McCaffrey, despite the feebly unconvincing love story."
Another entry in the Brain/Brawn series created by Anne McCaffrey, and a direct sequel to the paperback The City Who Fought (McCaffrey and Stirling); ``brains'' are humans wired directly and immovably into their spaceships, ``brawns'' their mobil human partners. Read full book review >
THE BLACK SUN by Jack Williamson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

In 1928, at the young age of 20, science fiction grandmaster Williamson (The Humanoids, 1995, etc.) published his first story. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

From Morgan Matson, the bestselling author of Since You’ve Been Gone, comes The Unexpected Everything, a feel-good YA novel of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >