Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 288)

SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Bland and formulaic stuff; it's hard to imagine these stories making many new fans for Norton, let alone for the junior writers."
A sequel to Storms of Victory (1991), which consisted of short novels by Norton and Griffin set in the aftermath of the Turning, a decisive battle in the history of Norton's Witch World. Read full book review >
THE KING'S BUCCANEER by Raymond E. Feist
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 18, 1992

"More sophisticated readers may be annoyed by the author's plodding style, especially at such generous length."
Feist returns yet again to Midkemia, the world of his ``Riftwar'' trilogy (Magician, Silverthorn, A Darkness at Sethanon), this time focusing on the younger generation: his protagonist, Prince Nicholas, is the son of a main character in the trilogy. Read full book review >

MURDER AT DRURY LANE by Robert Lee Hall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 18, 1992

"Overall: a pleasurable read for fans of the historical mystery and a possible recommendation for bright YA readers."
Ben Franklin, spouting fewer aphorisms than before (Benjamin Franklin and the Case of Christmas Murder, etc.), sits through a David Garrick production at London's Drury Lane Theatre when unlikable heckler Dudley Midge tumbles from the balcony and dies. Read full book review >
DREAM MESSENGER by Masahiko Shimada
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 16, 1992

"What interests Shimada is the porousness of modern life, but he has not yet found the right metaphor or story-idea to express it."
Published in 1989 in Japan, this novel is the first US publication for Shimada; set in New York and Tokyo, it's a study of cultural displacement in the guise of a mother's quest for her long-lost son. Mrs. Amino is a Japanese-American whose little son Masao (Matthew) was kidnapped by his father when they lived in the US. Read full book review >
CRYSTAL LINE by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 2, 1992

"Pure soap-opera, offering just enough ideas, plot, and involvement to keep the fans happy and maybe tempt one or two new ones."
Third in McCaffrey's Crystal Singer series (Killashandra, 1985, etc.)—the life and times of a group of humans infected with the symbiotic longevity crystal of planet Ballybran, and upon whose abilities to locate, mine, cut, and tune crystal the galactic economy depends. Read full book review >

THE SHADOW RISING by Robert Jordan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Huge, then, and not entirely unrewarding."
Fourth in Jordan's colossal Wheel of Time series (The Dragon Reborn, 1991, etc.) and, again, all but unintelligible if you haven't read the preceding volumes. Read full book review >
MOSTLY HARMLESS by Douglas Adams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 28, 1992

"Might raise the odd grin among the terminally amused."
Mostly limp and inane: That's the sad reality of this, the fifth in Adams's once respectably droll Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 1992

Inaugural volume of a major Silverberg retrospective, featuring 24 substantial stories, 1981-88, with autobiographical introductions. Read full book review >
A DARK AND HUNGRY GOD ARISES by Stephen R. Donaldson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 15, 1992

"Still: persecution and torment piled upon woe is precisely what Donaldson fans keep coming back for."
Third (The Real Story, 1990, Forbidden Knowledge, 1991) of the far-future series involving vicious corporations, aliens, pirates, power politics, police, and a wealth of characters you wouldn't want your children to bring home to dinner, from an author whose motto might well be "Life's a bitch, and then you die." Read full book review >
THE EYE OF THE HUNTER by Dennis L. McKiernan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 12, 1992

"Given these ingredients, bestsellerdom is in the cards."
McKiernan's latest is set in the same fantasy-world as his previous Iron Tower and Silver Call series, with some of the characters in common. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Undeniably same-ish, then, but beautifully wrought and often effective."
A rare collection of anguished, apocalyptic tales from the famous editor (The Visible Man, 1977, etc.) comprising 11 solo stories and three collaborations, two with Jack Dann, one with Jack C. Halderman II. Read full book review >
A MILLION OPEN DOORS by John Barnes
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"All in all, another impressive performance."
Another thoughtful, well-handled, polished coming-of-age yarn from the author of the splendid Orbital Resonance (1991), etc. The far future, with thousands of human colonies isolated from one another by vast stellar distances, offered enormous scope for social engineering according to exotic parameters. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >