Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 288)

THE SWORD OF ORION by Robin A. White
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 17, 1993

"Gritty, occasionally outlandish, but fast-moving adventure in an intriguing setting."
Equipped for a special detective mission in the New World Order, a Navy sub-hunting plane goes to anarchic Afghanistan—in the latest technothriller by White (The Flight From Winter's Shadow, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
FULL SPECTRUM 4 by Lou Aronica
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 16, 1993

"High standards maintained: the fourth in this series is as thematically diverse, well crafted, and imaginative as ever."
Another noteworthy entry in this laudable series of original anthologies, this one comprising 19 stories—one a translation from the French—and a poem from Ursula K. LeGuin. Read full book review >

THE HAND OF CHAOS by Margaret Weis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 15, 1993

"Which, being translated into Fannish, means: another smash hit. (First printing of 60,000)"
Volume five of the apparently interminable Death Gate Cycle (Serpent Mage, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >
THE ARCHITECTURE OF DESIRE by Mary Gentle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 15, 1993

"The drawback, however, is the pushy narrative: matters would flow more agreeably, and Gentle would win more friends, if she stopped trying to overpower her audience."
Another tale set in the weird alternate past of Rats and Gargoyles (1991), with some of the characters in common. Read full book review >
THE CHILDREN OF MEN by P.D. James
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 4, 1993

"Despite an opening as slow as anything in James's recent outings, the departure from her usual formula is brilliantly conceived—the note of sad mortality so powerfully sustained that James's benediction of hope is almost unbearable."
Perturbed by reports that sperm counts among British males have been steadily dwindling in recent years, the doyenne of the English detective story has interrupted her increasingly leisurely series of mystery novels (Devices and Desires, 1989, etc.) for a futuristic dystopia of sterility. Read full book review >

COLD ALLIES by Patricia Anthony
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1993

"Gripping and realistic—despite an initial scenario that doesn't add up, rather nebulous aliens, and an overdose of military acronyms: an assured, imaginative, and distinctive debut."
In Anthony's near/medium future, greenhouse effects have altered global climates: Florida lies under water (but not, apparently, Washington, D.C.); much of the Midwest is now desert; fuel shortages are acute; and famine is endemic. Read full book review >
THE DOOR INTO SUNSET by Diane Duane
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1993

"Imaginative, well-handled magical affrays, plus plotting that- -eventually—provides enough twists and turns to keep things interesting: dramatic improvements after that glutinous start."
After a nine-year hiatus (The Door into Shadow, 1984, etc.), Duane's series again gets under way—this time as the evil Shadow and its minions threaten the Celtic/Norse-flavored kingdoms of Darthen and Arlen. Read full book review >
STAINLESS STEEL VISIONS by Harry Harrison
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1993

"Middling entertainment, with an agreeable host."
Thirteen tales, including one that's previously unpublished, spanning the nearly 40-year career of this Dublin-resident American writer/editor/artist—though the theme or basis for selection (if any) isn't clear. Read full book review >
THE WEALDWIFE'S TALE by Paul Hazel
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1993

"Hazel's fans will undoubtedly find all this much to their liking; those who prefer a clear-cut plot are more apt to find it annoying."
Hazel's latest takes him back to West Redding, the setting of his inventive ``Finn Trilogy'' (Yearwood, 1980; Undersea, 1982; Winterking, 1985). Read full book review >
THE TALISMANS OF SHANNARA by Terry Brooks
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1993

"Still, fans of the series won't be dissuaded."
Concluding the second series of Shannara yarns (The Elf Queen of Shannara, etc.) as the scions of Shannara—namely, the newly made Druid, Walker Boh, the Elf Queen Wren Elessedil, and the magical Ohmsford brothers, Par and Coll—somehow must unite their efforts in order to bring a final end to the evil Shadowen and their leader, Rimmer Dall. Read full book review >
SKYBOWL by Melanie Rawn
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 15, 1993

"Dedicated fans only."
Wrapping up the Dragon Star trilogy (Stronghold, 1990; The Dragon Token, p 24). Read full book review >
IF AT FAUST YOU DON'T SUCCEED by Roger Zelazny
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 1993

"Readers familiar with the Faust legend and medieval history in general will get an extra kick out of this one—and it's certainly the best novel-length work from either of the authors in well over a decade."
Zelazny and Sheckley return to the premise of Bring Me the Head of Prince Charming (1991): a millennial contest between Good and Evil for control of mankind's destiny. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >