Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 288)

MOCKINGBIRD by Sean Stewart
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Knotty, unsparing, and impressively wrought, but what it all means is anyone's guess."
Contemporary metaphorical fantasy from the author of Night Watch (1997). Read full book review >
A KNIGHT OF THE WORD by Terry Brooks
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Unevocative, humdrum, and devoid of narrative tension; still, fans of the previous book will probably want to investigate."
Relatively uncompelling sequel to Running with the Demon (1997), Brooks's good (the Word) vs. evil (the Void) clash set in contemporary America. Read full book review >

QUEST FOR THE FALLEN STAR by Piers Anthony
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 27, 1998

"Pleasant."
Boilerplate fantasy, of which a substantially different version was written originally by Richey, rewritten by Anthony's researcher Riggs, and finally tweaked and buffed by Anthony. Read full book review >
THE CENTURION'S EMPIRE by Sean McMullen
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 16, 1998

"An entertaining but vastly improbable jaunt through history as it wasn't."
Time-hopping, episodic first US appearance for Australia resident McMullen. Read full book review >
SIX MOON DANCE by Sheri S. Tepper
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 8, 1998

"Tepper has tremendous fun with her sex-role reversals, even when her purpose is deadly serious: Despite the clutter, stir in lashings of caustic wit—and the upshot won't just raise your consciousness, it'll blow the top right off."
More challenging feminist science fiction from the author of the brilliant The Family Tree (1997), etc. On planet Newholme, men outnumber women two to one; Men of Business must therefore pay, handsomely, for a woman's reproductive services and for expert-lover Consorts (Hunks) to provide sexual pleasure for their wives. Read full book review >

THE INNAMORATI by Midori Snyder
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1998

"Captivating stuff, with a kiss of the fingers, a whisper of lace, and a stiletto up the sleeve: after this, even stubborn monoglots will find themselves mumbling in Italian."
Distinctive medieval fantasy from the author of various paperbacks (Belden's Keep, not reviewed, etc.). Read full book review >
MIR by Alexander Besher
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1998

"But with little structure or plot, it subsides into mere VR froth."
A quasi-sequel to Besher's flavorsome cyber-reality Rim (1994), with a somewhat different backdrop but some of the characters in common. Read full book review >
THE SILVER WOLF by Alice Borchardt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1998

"Top-flight fantasy."
ories, thieves' markets, and much more. Read full book review >
WITH THE LIGHTNINGS by David Drake
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1998

"After a sluggish start—the schmoozing and politicking quickly grow tedious—the yarn unfolds into an authentically taut and exciting tussle, courtesy of Drake's unflinching portrayal of battle's downside and his eye for telling detail."
More military science fiction from one of the leading exponents (Patriots, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
THE RUNELORDS by David Farland
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1998

"A bloody, violent, grim saga, with thoughtfully devised magics, and, despite rather anonymous characters, a well-turned plot: overall, reasonably satisfying and involving."
Another doorstopper fantasy series is launched, this one with a boiler-plate medieval-style backdrop and a well-developed system of magic. Read full book review >
BROWN GIRL IN THE RING by Nalo Hopkinson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1998

"A splendid if often gruesome debut, superbly plotted and redolent of the rhythms of Afro-Caribbean speech: 'You just don't let she go, or I go zap the both of allyou one time.'"
Winner of the publisher's First Novel Contest (out of nearly 1,000 entries), Hopkinson's debut evokes Afro-Caribbean magic against a near-future Toronto damaged by riots and neglect and abandoned by all but the most desperate inhabitants. Read full book review >
THE YEAR'S BEST SCIENCE FICTION by Gardner Dozois
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1998

"For anyone interested in sf short stories, this is the best—indeed, the only—place to start."
paper 0-312-19033-6 Another mind-bogglingly huge compendium of 28 stories that first appeared in 1997, sniffed out by editor Dozois, whose nose for a good yarn is as keen as ever. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >