Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 288)

THE TOOTH FAIRY by Graham Joyce
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 20, 1998

"Sharp, freshly imagined, and evocative work, by turns wrenching, funny, and disquieting."
From the author of Requiem (1996): a story about a boy growing up in England in the 1960s—with one singular difference: He's haunted by a demonic Tooth Fairy that only he can see, but whose effects spill over into his family and friends. Read full book review >
DINOSAUR SUMMER by Greg Bear
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 17, 1998

"Amiable, sometimes stirring incident-packed baloney: a yarn that screams I wanna be a movie!"
Fantasy built on a fantasy—in Bear's alternative 1947, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World wasn't fiction, but fact!—mingling real and imaginary characters with a quite unbelievable hodgepodge of defiantly unextinct beasties from the Carboniferous on up. Read full book review >

EMPIRE OF THE ANTS by Bernard Werber
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 9, 1998

"A tour de force."
Empire Of The Ants ($23.95; Feb. 9; 256 pp.; 0-553-09613-3): First published in France in 1991, this ingenious anthropomorphic fantasy draws disturbing parallels between the rigidly structured ``empire'' in which ants work, multiply, make war, and survive and the less ordered lives of their most dangerous predators: human beings. Read full book review >
PRINCE OF DOGS by Kate Elliott
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"A solidly engrossing addition to a worthwhile series."
Second entry in Elliott's doorstopper fantasy series (King's Dragon, Feb. 1997) set in the old/medieval-Europeflavored kingdom of Wendar. Read full book review >
IN THE GARDEN OF IDEN by Kage Baker
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Set it forth in a narrative that sparkles with wit: The upshot is a highly impressive and thoroughly engrossing debut."
The ubiquitous Company is Dr. Zeus, Incorporated; by the year 2335, it owns nearly everything. Read full book review >

FLESH AND GOLD by Phyllis Gotlieb
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Overinvolved but unflinching with a splendid array of aliens, motives, and perversions."
First outing for the Canadian poet and writer since Heart of Red Iron (1989). Read full book review >
ICEFALCON'S QUEST by Barbara Hambly
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Once again, some intriguing ideas embedded in a standard fantasy backdrop and plot, peopled by chortling, banal villains: should please series fans."
Another entry in the series (Mother of Winter, 1996, etc.) about a world where both magic and science (e.g., clones, transporters) work, and where two Earth people, the mage Rudy and the warrior Gil, have taken up residence. Read full book review >
IN THE MOOD by Charles Grant
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Simply feels ground out."
Famine now leads the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse as they sweep across the planet in volume two of the Millennium Quartet, following the plotlessly sluggish Symphony (1996), which was devoted to Death. Read full book review >
COSM by Gregory Benford
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"But Benford makes little attempt to grapple with the philosophical issues raised, and his leading lady could use a personality transplant. (Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club featured alternate selection; author tour)"
First of Avon's new f/sf line (see also Danvers, below) relaunched under the Eos imprint: a near-future you-are-there account of physics and physicists from a writer/scientist who knows whereof he speaks (Foundation's Fear, p 102, etc.). Read full book review >
CIRCUIT OF HEAVEN by Dennis Danvers
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Short circuit: plenty of hiss and crackle, no real substance."
Co-launching with Gregory Benford (see above) Avon's new f/sf Eos imprint, and very agreeably priced: a virtual-reality romance, from the author of Wilderness (1991) and Time and Time Again (1994). Read full book review >
THE NANO FLOWER by Peter F. Hamilton
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Gratifyingly complex and challenging—indeed, impossible to summarize adequately, what with battles, love stories, vendettas, imponderable aliens, and robust characters: a fine trilogy, sure, but this one's in a class by itself."
Third in Hamilton's trilogy (Mindstar Rising, 1996; A Quantum Murder, p. 1421) featuring Greg Mandel, of the psi- powered Mindstar Battalion. Read full book review >
THE LIFE OF INSECTS by Victor Pelevin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"A brilliant work from one of the best newer writers on the international scene."
An ingenious and cryptic allegorical fantasy, obviously inspired by Karel apek's classic play The Insect Comedy, in which characters exist simultaneously as human beings and as various insects—by the prize-winning young Russian author of Omon Ra and The Yellow Arrow (both 1996). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >