Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 288)

CTHULHU 2000 by Jim Turner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 11, 1995

"Does Arkham and Lovecraft proud—and may Arkham someday reprint its first book ever, Lovecraft's omnibus The Outsider."
Eighteen fantastic stories, including parodies, inspired by horrormeister H.P. Lovecraft (18901937). Read full book review >
MERLIN'S HARP by Anne Eliot Crompton
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 8, 1995

"An easy double for young adults."
From the author of A Woman's Place (1978, not reviewed) and several children's books: an amusing and inventive twist on the inexhaustively fecund Arthurian legends. Read full book review >

THE RESURRECTIONIST by Thomas F. Monteleone
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 5, 1995

"Christ for comic strips."
Faint retread of his last supernatural suspenser, The Blood of the Lamb (1992), again featuring a quasi-Jesus figure with the power of miracle. Read full book review >
THE GODMOTHER'S APPRENTICE by Elizabeth Ann Scarborough
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

The Godmother (1994) wasn't, alas, about female mafiosi, but introduced a suburban fantasy of good and bad fairies, frog princes, wicked stepmothers, talking cats, and characters from the brothers Grimm. Read full book review >
EVOLUTION'S SHORE by Ian McDonald
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Yet McDonald's tale is also inventive and challenging, despite that disappointing non-ending: a dense, complex, rather weighty, often fascinating piece of speculation."
Optimistic near-future alien-contact yarn from the Ireland resident author of the gloomy The Broken Land (1992), etc. In 2003, Saturn's moon Hyperion unaccountably vanishes, while large meteorites strike Earth's tropic regions. Read full book review >

WOMEN AT WAR by Lois McMaster Bujold
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Worth a browse for enlightened readers; mandatory for unreconstructed mcps."
A quarter of a century ago, as the editors ruefully admit, this would have been a groundbreaking anthology, composed as it is of 17 ``original military science fiction stories by women writers.'' Still, groundbreaking or not, the proposition is more elastic than it sounds, including several fantasies and one yarn without military significance. Read full book review >
FAR FUTURES by Gregory Benford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Abstrusely wonderful ideas undermined by graceless drama and contrived plotting."
Five original novellas derived from an exciting concept: Benford encouraged his contributors to extrapolate to, or speculate upon, the almost unimaginably remote future. Read full book review >
POINT OF HOPES by Melissa Scott
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Still, readers in no particular hurry will find plenty to divert them."
Scott and Barnett's (previous collaboration, the paperback The Armor of Light, 1987) medieval fantasy world has two suns; magic works here, as does astrology. Read full book review >
RUBY SLIPPERS, GOLDEN TEARS by Ellen Datlow
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"The fairy-tale tradition clearly retains its imaginative fertility, and the authors have almost without exception risen to the occasion."
The third in a series of classic fairy tales retold for adult readers (Snow White, Blood Red, 1993; Black Thorn, White Rose, 1994) again brings a distinguished company of writers to age-old material. Read full book review >
CAVERNS OF SOCRATES by Dennis L. McKiernan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Though McKiernan has improved since his dire imitation-Tolkien days, this clanking and bloated yarn amounts to little more than a talky belaboring of what-is-reality? notions previously explored by dozens of other writers."
An attempt to wrest fantasy from a science-fiction backdrop— or vice versa—from the author of Voyage of the Fox Rider (1993), etc. Some years from now, the world has been depopulated by a dreadful plague. Read full book review >
THE GANYMEDE CLUB by Charles Sheffield
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Another intriguing and involving effort, whose one possible drawback is that it doesn't chronologically advance the persuasively detailed scenario Sheffield has already expertly mapped out."
A second yarn set in the medium-future, war-devastated solar system of Cold as Ice (1992), with some of the characters in common. Read full book review >
AN EXALTATION OF LARKS by Robert Reed
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"A persuasive small-town purlieu tilting away into a hypertrophied flight-of-fancy impossible to believe in or care about—which is Reed's usual outcome."
As in Beyond the Veil of Stars (1994), Reed takes a familiar setting and then introduces pan-cosmic complications, to initially stunning but ultimately self-defeating effect. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >