Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 3)

Blood Family by Brent Winter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 14, 2017

"A clever, engaging view into dark places."
Fantasy and horror blend in Winter's debut novel about a man who discovers his family's links to the supernatural. Read full book review >
ROSEBLOOD by A.G. Howard
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A rich, atmospheric story that readers will be hard-pressed to put down. (Fantasy. 13 & up)"
The Phantom of the Opera is reborn in this supernatural tale of music, passions, and love. Read full book review >

A TOASTER ON MARS by Darrell Pitt
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and Doctor Who fans are a natural audience for this story, but it may well build a broader readership once the word gets out. (Science fiction. 14 & up)"
This pseudo-science-fiction book provides laughs of all types: readers will progress from snickers to giggles to, finally, belly laughs and shouts of outrage. Read full book review >
SHADOW MOUNTAIN by Tess Collins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 4, 2017

"A vivid first installment of a saga that will make readers look forward to the next."
An Appalachian woman and her son struggle to protect their mountain home in Collins' (The Hunter of Hertha, 2015, etc.) historical-fantasy series starter.Read full book review >
RECLUCE TALES by L.E. Modesitt Jr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"Don't expect great significance everywhere—some of the pieces are no more than vignettes—but Modesitt is excellent company, and the more familiar you are with the series, the richer these stories will seem."
A collection of 17 new and three reprinted stories plus an essay, weaving among the prolific Modesitt's impressive 18-book (and counting) fantasy Saga of Recluse (Heritage of Cyador, 2014, etc.). Read full book review >

APOCALYPSE ALL THE TIME by David Atkinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2017

"An imaginative engagement with existential questions raised by a surfeit of apocalypses."
In this absurdist novel set in a world of serial apocalypses, a man tries to make sense of his existence. Read full book review >
MINIATURES by John Scalzi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 31, 2016

"Somewhat repetitive in theme, often verging on the silly, but on the whole, quite amusing."
Scalzi has said that his two writing strengths are his novels (The End of All Things, 2015, etc.) and his very short fiction; this slim offering showcases the latter. Read full book review >
DEATH'S DANCER by Jasmine Silvera
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 30, 2016

"A spirited, sexy paranormal romance."
Sparks fly when a mighty sorcerer recruits a dancer to help unravel a supernatural mystery. Read full book review >
The Dark Lord by Jack Heckel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 27, 2016

"A diverting, heartfelt adventure that provides laughs in between earnest moments and spells."
In this fantasy, a mage tries to save the same world he'd tormented as an evil wizard—part of his university studies—with help from the heroes who'd fought him. Read full book review >
DEAD WEIGHT by Matt Casamassina
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 17, 2016

"Solid apocalyptic fiction that focuses more on its character relationships than its sci-fi elements."
In this debut YA thriller, the leftovers of an unexplained apocalypse struggle to survive and find meaning in the wreckage. Read full book review >
CLING by Jeff Menapace
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 14, 2016

"Elevates the dystopian genre with snappy writing, well-drawn characters, intriguing back story, and bracing battles.


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In a post-apocalyptic wasteland, a woman with special powers and a small band of underground survivors take on a cruel warlord. Read full book review >
DAWN OF LEGAIA by A.C. Hachem
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 13, 2016

"An expansive tale, despite its focus on one character, that offers trendy tech and substantial back story for a planned series."
A scientist aiming to colonize a new planet faces strong—and potentially lethal—opposition from an affluent rival in Hachem's sci-fi debut. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >