Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 3)

THE TOURIST by Robert Dickinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"Echoes of Bradbury and Orwell, in the service of a crackerjack conspiracy plot; a seductively intriguing work of speculative fiction."
Welcome to the 21st century. Please don't feed the natives. Read full book review >
Opaque by Calix Leigh-Reign
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 22, 2016

"A somewhat standard, if rousing, supernatural tale combined with a gleefully eccentric teenage romance."
In Leigh-Reign's debut sci-fi thriller, a teenage misanthrope questions his disturbing proclivities and even his origin after he becomes inexplicably captivated by a new girl at school. Read full book review >

LOST GODS by Brom
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"An oddly schizophrenic yarn—organized above, chaotic below—but fans of Brom's weirdly offbeat imagination will find much to admire."
Underworld fantasy from the artist, games designer, and novelist (Krampus, 2012, etc.). Read full book review >
THIS WAY TO THE END TIMES by Robert Silverberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"Wonderfully written, surprisingly varied apocalyptic tales."
In a substantial anthology of stories about the end of the world, editor Silverberg (Tales of Majipoor, 2013, etc.) brings together works by both classic science-fiction writers and contemporary authors. Read full book review >
ALTERED STARSCAPE by Ian Douglas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"Not Douglas' finest opening statement, but fans should be engrossed enough to come back for more."
Space war trouper Douglas (Deep Time, 2015, etc.) pilots a new alien-warfare series into furious action powered by intriguing speculation. Read full book review >

THE FATE OF THE TEARLING by Erika Johansen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2016

"Overall, a satisfying close to a long but worthy yarn."
The Red Queen is off her head—and heads, it seems, will roll in this closing installment of Johansen's Tearling trilogy. Read full book review >
THE DIABOLIC by S.J. Kincaid
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Philosophical, twisty, and addictive. (Science fiction. 13 & up)"
A genetically engineered killing-machine bodyguard must impersonate her charge in a dangerous galactic court. Read full book review >
Silver Rain by Patrick Harris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A technology-inspired mystery with all the fun of a zombie-esque outbreak."
Nanobytes released into the air transform most of the U.S. population into crazed killers who attack the unaffected in this sci-fi thriller. Read full book review >
Highway Thirteen to Manhattan by Kourtney Heintz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A daring, if occasionally dreary, series installment that shows that love can be an unremitting trial—with or without superpowers."
A telepath has a near-death experience and later struggles with an inner darkness in Heintz's (The Six Train to Wisconsin, 2013) paranormal drama. Read full book review >
INVISIBLE PLANETS by Ken Liu
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A phenomenal anthology of short speculative fiction."
In this anthology, Liu offers an assortment of the short fiction he's translated, along with three short essays about Chinese science fiction. Read full book review >
Infinity by Jus Accardo
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A fun YA sci-fi story with a compelling cast of characters."
A rebellious teenager discovers a family secret that involves hopping between dimensions and confronts a dangerous killer in Accardo's (Embraced, 2015, etc.) latest novel, the first in a series.Read full book review >
THE MAD SCIENTIST'S DAUGHTER by Cassandra Rose Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"An ambitious tale that doesn't quite deliver."
A reissue of Clarke's (Our Lady of the Ice, 2015, etc.) 2013 novel about the relationship between a roboticist's daughter and the android she's known since childhood. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >