Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 408)

GOODLOW'S GHOSTS by T.M. Wright
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"The entire novel's a bit ghostly itself: eerie, but so thin you can see right through it."
Slackly plotted though occasionally spooky yarn about Boston- area ghosts—and the hardcover debut of psychic detective Ryerson Biergarten, whose cases Wright (Little Boy Lost, p. 498, etc.) has covered in several pseudonymous (``F.W. Armstrong'') paperbacks. Read full book review >
DAMIA'S CHILDREN by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Considerably more substance than hitherto, but shapeless and exasperatingly inconclusive: only series fans need apply."
McCaffrey's third far-future yarn (The Rowan, 1990; Damia, p. 577) in which powerful psychic Talents teleport cargo and people about the galaxy, while leaving themselves ample time for family doings and telepathic chat. Read full book review >

ELVISSEY by Jack Womack
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Terraplane (1988) remains his crowning achievement."
Fourth venture into Womack's bleak, violent, sterile future (Heathern, 1990, etc.) in which America is run by the Dryco Corporation, and worship of E (Elvis) is the major religion. Read full book review >
TRIUMPH by Ben Bova
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Though sometimes blurred in the fine detail (Bova has problems with British speech and idioms, for instance): a low-key, convincing what-if, stuffed with famous figures and likely to tempt WW II buffs, as well as Bova fans and sf regulars."
Intriguing speculation on a major historical turning point, from the veteran editor-writer (Mars, p. 503, etc.)—namely, what if Franklin Delano Roosevelt had lived and Josef Stalin had died? Read full book review >
THE CALL OF EARTH by Orson Scott Card
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Slow, but reasonably involving and persuasive after a virtually unintelligible first 50 pages, where readers are expected to instantly recall details from volume one."
Second in Card's science-fiction series (The Memory of Earth, p. 81) set on planet Harmony, whose ruling computer, the Oversoul, is breaking down after 40 million years' service. Read full book review >

DOMES OF FIRE by David Eddings
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"482), but another three volumes of this will tax even the moat loyal of fans."
Book One of yet another fantasy trilogy, itself a sequel to a trilogy, The Elenium (concluded with The Sapphire Rose, not seen), which chronicled the Pandion knight Sparhawk's defeat of the evil god Azash. Read full book review >
WITCH OF THE NORTH by Courtway Jones
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Rather fun."
The second in Jones's King Arthur trilogy (In the Shadow of the Oak King, 1991), in which the golden myths are hammered into highly serviceable clang-and-gallop adventures. Read full book review >
KING JAVAN'S YEAR by Katherine Kurtz
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"A grim, brutal installment, but well up to Kurtz's usual standard: layer upon layer of patient detail, life-sized characters, and controlled, intricate plotting."
After a long wait since The Harrowing of Gwynedd (1988), here's book number two in Kurtz's latest medieval, Celtic-flavored fantasy trilogy—an unremitting power struggle involving kings, nobles, the Church, and magic-powered Deryni. Read full book review >
SEED UPON THE WIND by Carole Nelson Douglas
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"A curious hybrid of stock romantic fantasy and something more ambitious, this one might appeal to the readers of Stephen R. Donaldson."
In this sequel to Cup of Clay (1991), Douglas returns Allison Carver, a Minnesota reporter, to the fantasy world called Veil, setting of the first of the series. Read full book review >
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Bland and formulaic stuff; it's hard to imagine these stories making many new fans for Norton, let alone for the junior writers."
A sequel to Storms of Victory (1991), which consisted of short novels by Norton and Griffin set in the aftermath of the Turning, a decisive battle in the history of Norton's Witch World. Read full book review >
THE KING'S BUCCANEER by Raymond E. Feist
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 18, 1992

"More sophisticated readers may be annoyed by the author's plodding style, especially at such generous length."
Feist returns yet again to Midkemia, the world of his ``Riftwar'' trilogy (Magician, Silverthorn, A Darkness at Sethanon), this time focusing on the younger generation: his protagonist, Prince Nicholas, is the son of a main character in the trilogy. Read full book review >
MURDER AT DRURY LANE by Robert Lee Hall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 18, 1992

"Overall: a pleasurable read for fans of the historical mystery and a possible recommendation for bright YA readers."
Ben Franklin, spouting fewer aphorisms than before (Benjamin Franklin and the Case of Christmas Murder, etc.), sits through a David Garrick production at London's Drury Lane Theatre when unlikable heckler Dudley Midge tumbles from the balcony and dies. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >