Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 410)

TAM LIN by Pamela Dean
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 24, 1991

"But the energetic prose carries the dithering plot along comfortably, and when the Otherworld does intrude, it is as creepy, seductive, and threatening as it is in the ancient tales themselves."
Despite their titles, the novels in the Fairy Tales series (Patricia C. Wrede's Snow White and Rose Red, 1989) are not simple retellings of familiar stories. Read full book review >
THE EIGHTH RANK by David D. Ross
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 17, 1991

"Only in the more thoughtfully plotted closing chapters does a semblance of ambition and vitality return to what is otherwise a sluggish, talky, and twiddling reprise of book one."
Second in the series following The Argus Gambit (1989), which introduced a near-future power struggle between stay-at- home reactionaries like megalomaniac businessman Horatius Krebs and a progressive conspiracy involving US President Shefferton, as well as various brilliant scientists whose aim is to build a star-drive and free humanity to expand into the galaxy. Read full book review >

RATS AND GARGOYLES by Mary Gentle
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 1991

"Probably of more interest to students of Renaissance Hermetic magia than fantasy-lovers hoping for an agreeable diversion."
Churning power struggle set in a Renaissance world where alchemy, magic and science all work, and squares are pentagons; winged, immortal, devil-like Decans rule through their Gargoyle acolytes, and bipedal Rats lord it over fearful and oppressed human slaves and artisans. Read full book review >
WAR FEVER by J.G. Ballard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1991

"A notably uneven collection, ranging from mordant commentary and febrile near-brilliance to murky or trite experiments and subterfuges."
Fourteen variations, 1976-89, reprinted from various newspapers and magazines. Read full book review >
THE PARATWA by Christopher Hinz
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 1991

"Hinz offers enough plot twists and action here to satisfy the faithful, though newcomers will have to start all the way back at book one."
The wrap-up to Hinz's futuristic trilogy about a power struggle between a repressed humanity and the Paratwa, telepathically linked pairs of talented beings supported by a mysterious royal caste. Read full book review >

DAYS OF ATONEMENT by Walter Jon Williams
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 18, 1991

"What won't appeal to the kinder, gentler sections of the audience are the local of feminine interest, the callous monomania displayed by most of the cast, and the gratuitously overblown violence of the windup."
From the author of the splendid Voice of the Whirlwind (1987) and the less pleasing Angel Station (1989), a mainstream- ish tale of a traditional New Mexico police chief propelled headlong into a future he can barely understand. Read full book review >
NIGHTFALL by Isaac Asimov
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 7, 1990

"Bound to have curiosity appeal."
Asimov's long story "Nightfall" (1941), written when he was just 21, concerns the inhabitants of a planet with six suns. Read full book review >
JURASSIC PARK by Michael Crichton
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 7, 1990

"A sure-fire best-seller."
Genetically engineered dinosaurs run amok in Crichton's new, vastly entertaining science thriller. Read full book review >
BEYOND THE FALL OF NIGHT by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 17, 1990

"So, Clarke's near-best has brought out the usually brilliant Benford's absolute worst—and the upshot is a project ill-conceived, ill-wrought, and irrelevant."
In Benford's case, beyond anything remotely in harmony with Clarke's far-future saga Against the Fall of Night (later reworked as the better 1956 novel, The City and the Stars). Read full book review >
TALES FROM PLANET EARTH by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1990

"Dated in some respects, startlingly predictive in others: Clarke is never at the cutting edge here, but he is good company, and the rarities will make it a useful addition to collections and libraries."
A major retrospective, 1949-65, featuring 13 stories, several rarely if ever reprinted, and a 1987 fictional essay ("On Golden Seas") amusingly setting forth Clarke's disapproving views on Star Wars. Read full book review >
THE DIFFERENCE ENGINE by William Gibson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 4, 1990

In their first major collaboration, sf heavyweights Gibson and Sterling spin an exquisitely clever filigree of Victorian alternate history, sparkling densely with ideas, moored by a challenging subtext of chaos theory and the lessons of recent paleontology. Read full book review >
THE LAST VOYAGE OF SOMEBODY THE SAILOR by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 11, 1990

"A thin story in a very fat book."
Barth is back with another big (544-page), bawdy, and "postmodernist" book, replete with the usual metafictional conceits, in which the "New Journalist" hero, a contemporary Scheherazade of sorts, likes to swap tales with the legendary Sinbad the Sailor, while trying to get his bearings, both metaphorically and literally. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >