Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 411)

WORLDWAR: TILTING THE BALANCE by Harry Turtledove
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1995

"Turtledove hasn't the knack of sketching really distinctive characters, but his patiently detailed panoramic saga—a detachment rather than an independent module—continues to engage. (Doubleday Science Fiction Book Club alternate selection)"
The second installment of Turtledove's vast WW II/alien invasion saga simply picks up where Worldwar: In the Balance (1993) left off. Read full book review >
INTO THE DEEP by Ken Grimwood
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 24, 1995

"Just the sort of thing dolphins would make fun of, if they could read."
Sugary New Age nonsense cripples Grimwood's (Replay, 1986, etc.) mildly inventive eco-thriller, in which humans and dolphins join forces to save Santa Barbara, Calif., from volcanic disaster. Read full book review >

PAPA'S SUITCASE by Gerhard Kopf
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 20, 1995

"An odd little novel that travels well, though it can't help being derivative."
Kîpf (There is No Borges, 1993) spins another tale of literary obsession, and fellow bibliophiles will smile in recognition when his Hemingway-devouring narrator wonders, ``Have I read myself into life or read myself out of it?'' In a voice that appears almost deranged, this bookstore clerk hurtles through his acquaintance with Hemingway's work; reading Papa's short stories was ``like an infection with a life-long high fever,'' he proclaims. Read full book review >
THE MOUNTAINS OF MAJIPOOR by Robert Silverberg
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 15, 1995

"Thin, but polished and agreeable and familiar."
After a considerable absence, Silverberg again takes up his Majipoor chronicles (Lord Valentine's Castle, 1980, etc.). Read full book review >
BENEATH THE TREE OF HEAVEN by David Wingrove
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 2, 1995

"Like the other books in the series: vast, dense, overpopulated, bookish, absorbing for addicts, impenetrable to outsiders."
In the fifth volume of Wingrove's immense Chung Kuo saga of Earth in the 23rd century (The Stone Within, 1993, etc.), the rule of the seven Chinese overlords, or T'angs, is crumbling, as the need for change grows more powerful than the T'angs' ability to suppress it. Read full book review >

VURT by Jeff Noon
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Like Scribble's feathers, Vurt leads to a wild and kaleidoscopic ride, but fails to entirely satisfy. (Author tour)"
Noon's hardcover debut transforms the world of virtual reality into ``vurt,'' a playland of psychedelic fantasies anyone can explore without cumbersome helmets or control gloves. Read full book review >
THE IMMORTALITY OPTION by James P. Hogan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"A beguiling and diverting yarn—once again, its benignly satirical elements help—that totters towards success despite a plot that grows increasingly more absurd."
The belated sequel to Code of the Lifemaker (1983), Hogan's mildly satirical tale featuring an ecology composed entirely of machines derived from an alien factory that went haywire on Saturn's frigid, smoggy moon, Titan, a million years ago. Read full book review >
FROM TIME TO TIME by Jack Finney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Zestless."
A sequel to the classic Time and Again (1970) that, like many reprises of a once-good idea, fails to live up to the original. Read full book review >
DREAMLAND by Hilary Hemingway
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Obviously a far cry from Papa Hemingway's realism, Dreamland is spotty SF that takes an occasional, if unintentional, satirical swipe at space-age angst. (Author tour)"
Anyone who still believes that visitors from outer space are little wrinkled green men with weaving antennae are in for some surprises in this novel by Hemingway (niece of Ernest) and her husband, Lindsay. Read full book review >
NOW YOU SEE IT... by Richard Matheson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Unfortunately for Matheson, the reader may be laughing, too."
A bizarre misfire from horror guru Matheson (Earthbound, p. 727, etc.). Read full book review >
ARCHANGEL by Mike Conner
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Still, despite some problems with plot credibility, an intriguing and inventive hardcover debut."
In Conner's alternate 1930, a lethal hemorrhagic fever (known as Hun for its supposed origins in the German trenches of 1918) has repeatedly swept the world, leaving few white survivors; oddly, black Africans are wholly immune. Read full book review >
THE ROAD HOME by Joel Rosenberg
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Add on the nonexistent plot and absence of action—and this entry will certainly try the patience of even the most devoted series fans."
The seventh part of Rosenberg's Guardians of the Flame series (The Road to Ehvenor, 1991, etc.), wherein various exiles from Earth struggle to eradicate slavery from, and introduce technology to, a world where magic works and telepathic dragons are real. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >