Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 412)

THE MAGIC ENGINEER by Jr. Modesitt
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1994

"In sum, another uneven installment, sometimes engaging, often frustrating, with interesting inversions and sidelights; and, the worst distraction of all, set forth in an ultimately self-destructive present tense."
Third in Modesitt's series (The Magic of Recluce, 1991; The Towers of the Sunset, 1992) about the island kingdom of Recluce, and the incessant tensions between Chaos (white magic) and Order (black magic). Read full book review >
A COLLEGE OF MAGICKS by Caroline Stevermer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Stevermer has made a successful transition to adult entertainment; which, as others have discovered, is by no means as easy as it looks."
The first adult-oriented fantasy from the author of various juveniles (River Rats, 1992, etc.), set in an intriguing, not-so- different early 20th-century alternate world where magic works unobtrusively. Read full book review >

LYON'S PRIDE by Anne McCaffrey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 16, 1994

"The main drawback is in telling the characters apart; even keeping their names straight is a headache. (Science Fiction Book Club Main Selection)"
Fourth in the series (Damia's Children, etc.) of far-future, galactic empire yarns in which the descendants of The Rowan— blessed with telepathic and teleportational abilities—carry on the usual multigenerational family activities while cooperating to investigate the threat posed by the Hivers, incomprehensible, expansionist, insect-like aliens utterly hostile to non-Hiver life forms. Read full book review >
A TUPOLEV TOO FAR by Brian Aldiss
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 1994

"A typically mixed bag, occasionally brilliant, often funny, always diverting."
Thirteen fairly recent pieces, including a weird alphabet and an amusing introductory poem, from the British sf/fantasy grandmaster (previous collections include A Romance of the Equator and Man in his Time). Read full book review >
THE WILD WOOD by Charles de Lint
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"Well meant but less substantial than a soap bubble. (First printing of 25,000)"
Billed as Brian Froud's Faerielands, this is the first of a series of four books by different authors on faerie-ecological themes, and inspired by Froud's artwork. Read full book review >

RAMA REVEALED by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"Still, there will be hordes of Rama fans desperate to discover how it all comes out."
Rendezvous with Rama didn't need sequels, but we got them anyway. Read full book review >
SHADOW OF THE WELL OF SOULS by Jack L. Chalker
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"While the present volume is independently intelligible (just about), it isn't complete in itself, and newcomers will do better to read Echoes first, or even return to the original saga."
Sequel to Echoes of the Well of Souls (not seen), itself a sequel to Chalker's original five-book Well World saga. Read full book review >
THE WITCH DOCTOR by Christopher Stasheff
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Otherwise, it lacks originality; furthermore, strangely, it reminds you of other writers whose names you somehow can't quite recall."
Sequel to The Oathbound Wizard (1992), about a medieval fantasy world of jousting and pageantry, where poetry holds the power of magic. Read full book review >
THE LAST BOOK OF SWORDS by Fred Saberhagen
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"But Saberhagen's series, while uneven at times, has provided tireless entertainment in the seemingly inexhaustible combination of Swords and magics, and no fan of the series will want to miss this one."
Saberhagen's Lost Swords yarns have been appearing since 1986; here, he wraps up the entire idea in fine style, by destroying the Swords one by one. Read full book review >
CURSE OF THE MISTWRAITH by Janny Wurts
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A tremendous amount of hard work but no signs of genuine talent, composed of gnarled writing, a farrago of plot elements, and ideas no better than mediocre retreads."
Wurts, coauthor (with Raymond E. Feist) of Mistress of the Empire (1992), etc., embarks on a massively ambitious five-book sword-and-sorcery epic involving good and evil, light and dark, and two warring half-brothers. Read full book review >
LARQUE ON THE WING by Nancy Springer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Charming, eccentric work where the bright, playful narrative enfolds a thoughtful and significant interior: irresistible."
Springer continues the marked improvement she showed in Apocalypse (1989) with this winning, precisely rendered foray into magic realism. Read full book review >
THE EMPIRE OF ICE by Richard Moran
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Stock characters and clunkily-handled science put a freeze on suspense and excitement here: a derivative end-of-worlder."
An active volcano emerges from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, threatening to plunge the British Isles into a new Ice Age: a plot- heavy disaster thriller from Moran (Cold Sea Rising, 1986; Dallas Down, 1988). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >