Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 412)

MEMORIES OF THE SPACE AGE by J.G. Ballard
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 30, 1988

"Worthwhile, certainly, but more variety would have served this fine writer more justly."
Eight stories, 1962-85, exploring what Ballard views as a grandiose and mesmerizing yet ill-judged and ultimately doomed enterprise: the manned exploration of space. Read full book review >
AZAZEL by Isaac Asimov
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 1988

"Harmless, vaguely amusing froth."
Eighteen lightweight stories, 1982-88, plus one original, about Azazel—the grumpy, egotistical, two-centimeter-tall demon that only pompous, tightfisted linguist George Bitternut knows how to conjure up. Read full book review >

NIGHTMARES IN THE SKY by Stephen King
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 7, 1988

"What stands out here, though, are Fitzgerald's 100 black-and white and 24 color photographs of the gargoyles perched high above New York and other East Coast cities—forceful, mournful, frightening depictions in light, shadow, and color of these usually unnoticed symbols of darkness."
A striking collaboration between King and photographer f-stop Fitzgerald, whose stark photographs of city gargoyles are what the Maine horror master ponders upon in a lengthy introductory essay. Read full book review >
ETERNITY by Greg Bear
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 3, 1988

"Another disappointment: the ideas are there, the discipline isn't."
Sequel to Eon (1985), exceedingly hard to follow if you haven't read the original or don't recall precisely what occurred therein. Read full book review >
THE GUNSLINGER (THE DARK TOWER, BOOK 1) by Stephen King
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 28, 1988

"Heavy, real heavy—as sales undoubtedly will be too."
Begun by King while at college in 1970; serialized episodically in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, 1978-1981; printed in limited-editon hardcover, 1982: this King novelty at last achieves mass publication. Read full book review >

LIBRA by Don DeLillo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 15, 1988

"But these are flaw-specks in a book that is genuinely dread-filled—a story that everyone knows he doesn't really know, and which DeLillo worries, and prods, and deepens with sure artistry."
DeLillo's fascination with conspiracy, apocalypse, and public events—tesselated from a hundred chips of separate, small human misery—turns to the Kennedy assassination almost inevitably. Read full book review >
NIGHT VISIONS 5 by Stephen King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1988

"And reader—a more sophisticated horror collection by far lurks in the forthcoming Prime Evil (p. 570)."
Seven old-fashioned, mostly dead-weight horror tales by three high-profde monster-mongers; only Martin's closing—and rousing—werewolf novella saves this collection from the Hall of Shame. Read full book review >
CONSIDER PHLEBAS by Iain M. Banks
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 3, 1988

"Overextended and jarring, then, but imaginative and gripping in places."
From the author of The Wasp Factory and Walking on Glass: a voluminous, sometimes exciting space-opera where character motivations are the most troubling of several knotty problems. Read full book review >
FANTASTIC VOYAGE II by Isaac Asimov
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 18, 1987

"It slips down easily enough but leaves no lingering impression."
Not a sequel to the original Fantastic Voyage (a 1966 movie novelization), which Asimov chooses to ignore completely; the upshot isn't too much more than a sclerotically talky retread. Read full book review >
SONGS OF DISTANT EARTH by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 12, 1987

"Still, there's much to admire here—not least Clarke's dream of civilization without fossilized hatreds and violence—and his vast audience won't be disappointed."
A short story that first appeared in 1958, expanded and polished to a high gloss. Read full book review >
2061 by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1987

"Indeed, Clarke, with an absorbing blend of scientific extrapolation and events that generate their own tension, has returned to something like Vintage form after years in the fictional doldrums."
Clarke's Odyssey yarns, like Herbert's Dune and Asimov's Foundation, have been self-perpetuating if, thus far, unimpressive. Read full book review >
THE BEST SCIENCE FICTION OF ISAAC ASIMOV by Isaac Asimov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 15, 1986

"Still, Asimovophiles will probably relish the cozy geniality of it all, and some curious browsers may be attracted too."
Twenty-eight tales, 1951-80, chosen by Asimov himself; excluded are the robot yarns (The Complete Robot, 1982), and "Nightfall," his best-known story. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >