Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 6)

Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"A steampunk-flavored adventure with amiable characters and a fantastical version of San Francisco that has imaginative promise but fails to engage with the Asian cultures it appears to take inspiration from."
In a novel that imagines a very alternate history, Cato (The Clockwork Crown, 2015, etc.) channels her flair for steampunk fantasy into the story of a plucky heroine living in San Francisco in 1906. Read full book review >
Wings of the Pegasus by Mark Kirsch
Released: Aug. 21, 2016

"An engaging, albeit unoriginal, premise, laid low by uninspiring storytelling."
Kirsch's debut sci-fi adventure novel tells a story set in a colossal starship containing 52 massive biospheres called Cylinders, inhabited by human colonists escaping an overpopulated Earth. Read full book review >

NOT SO MUCH, SAID THE CAT by Michael Swanwick
Released: Aug. 19, 2016

"Tales that, through their extraordinary clarity of thought and expression, showcase precisely why this multiaward-winning author is held in such high regard."
Another collection of speculative fiction from Swanwick (Chasing the Phoenix, 2015, etc.), one of a handful of writers whose short pieces are as impressive as their novels. Read full book review >
Sacred Planet by Austin Rogers
Released: Aug. 18, 2016

"An ambitious, ardent launch that sets a stellar precedent for installments to follow."
In Rogers' debut, the first book of a planned sci-fi series, a prime minister's daughter may be the key to evading an interstellar war. Read full book review >
Gar by Megan Twiddy
Released: Aug. 18, 2016

"This meteorite tale favors—and nails—teen romance but remains a mere inauguration for the mysterious titular character."
Twiddy jump-starts her debut YA sci-fi series with the story of a boy—who can morph into various creatures—wanting to know his origin while keeping his ability a secret. Read full book review >

GHOST TALKERS by Mary Robinette Kowal
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A fascinating premise somewhat burdened by workaday execution and pat characterizations, but fans of Kowal's formula will be charmed."
The terrible death tolls of World War I are revisited in an alternate history where the spirits of the dead can be interrogated for valuable military intelligence in another historical fantasy from Kowal (Of Noble Family, 2015, etc.). Read full book review >
THE OBELISK GATE  by N.K.  Jemisin
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"Stunning, again."
In the second of a trilogy (The Fifth Season, 2015) by the science-fiction columnist for the New York Times Book Review, the latest in a series of apocalypses marches on. Read full book review >
DANCING IN DREAMTIME by Scott Russell Sanders
Released: Aug. 15, 2016

"Sanders is at his best when he leaves humor behind to tell stories with big ideas; fortunately, over half the stories here do so, despite a shaky start."
A short story collection wrestling with modern isolation and dystopic futures, from an author also known for nonfiction essays about conservation and nature. Read full book review >
A Clearing in the Forest by Kim Love Stump
Released: Aug. 14, 2016

"Spellbinding and untraditional, this fantasy with a brave royal could teach Disney a few things about princess adventures."
A debut YA fantasy stars a princess who must venture forth into the world before she's allowed to rule. Read full book review >
One In A Million by Tony Faggioli
Released: Aug. 10, 2016

"Paranormal fans should enjoy this strange brew of revelations and romance, saints and sinners, remembering the past and attempting to save the future."
Cosmic chaos erupts in this tale of adultery, murder, and monsters. Read full book review >
A Million to One by Tony Faggioli
Released: Aug. 10, 2016

"A fast-paced sequel involving angelic and demonic machinations that's not for the faint of heart or stomach."
A second helping of a trilogy cooks up countless horrors and paranormal events. Read full book review >
Drop-Dead Gorgeous by Navy Topaz
Released: Aug. 10, 2016

"Chick-lit fantasy at its most textbook, with a predictable but fun Hollywood plot."
A woman raised to believe that she's an ugly duckling gets a life-changing makeover in this tale of beauty, both inside and out. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Maria Goodavage
October 24, 2016

Wherever the president goes, there will be dogs. They’ll be there no matter what the country or state. They’ll be there regardless of the political climate, the danger level, the weather, or the hour. Maria Goodavage’s new book Secret Service Dogs immerses readers in the heart of this elite world of canine teams who protect first families, popes, and presidential candidates: the selection of dogs and handlers, their year-round training, their missions around the world, and, most important, the bond—the glue that holds the teams together and can mean the difference between finding bombs and terrorists or letting them slip by. Secret Service Dogs celebrates the Secret Service’s most unforgettable canine heroes. It is a must-read for fans of Maria Goodavage, anyone who wants a rare inside view of the United States Secret Service, or just loves dogs. “Goodavage’s subjects and their companions are quirky and dedicated enough to engage readers wondering about those dogs on the White House lawn,” our reviewer writes. View video >