Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 6)

GHOST TALKERS by Mary Robinette Kowal
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"A fascinating premise somewhat burdened by workaday execution and pat characterizations, but fans of Kowal's formula will be charmed."
The terrible death tolls of World War I are revisited in an alternate history where the spirits of the dead can be interrogated for valuable military intelligence in another historical fantasy from Kowal (Of Noble Family, 2015, etc.). Read full book review >
THE OBELISK GATE  by N.K.  Jemisin
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"Stunning, again."
In the second of a trilogy (The Fifth Season, 2015) by the science-fiction columnist for the New York Times Book Review, the latest in a series of apocalypses marches on. Read full book review >

DANCING IN DREAMTIME by Scott Russell Sanders
Released: Aug. 15, 2016

"Sanders is at his best when he leaves humor behind to tell stories with big ideas; fortunately, over half the stories here do so, despite a shaky start."
A short story collection wrestling with modern isolation and dystopic futures, from an author also known for nonfiction essays about conservation and nature. Read full book review >
A Clearing in the Forest by Kim Love Stump
Released: Aug. 14, 2016

"Spellbinding and untraditional, this fantasy with a brave royal could teach Disney a few things about princess adventures."
A debut YA fantasy stars a princess who must venture forth into the world before she's allowed to rule. Read full book review >
One In A Million by Tony Faggioli
Released: Aug. 10, 2016

"Paranormal fans should enjoy this strange brew of revelations and romance, saints and sinners, remembering the past and attempting to save the future."
Cosmic chaos erupts in this tale of adultery, murder, and monsters. Read full book review >

A Million to One by Tony Faggioli
Released: Aug. 10, 2016

"A fast-paced sequel involving angelic and demonic machinations that's not for the faint of heart or stomach."
A second helping of a trilogy cooks up countless horrors and paranormal events. Read full book review >
Drop-Dead Gorgeous by Navy Topaz
Released: Aug. 10, 2016

"Chick-lit fantasy at its most textbook, with a predictable but fun Hollywood plot."
A woman raised to believe that she's an ugly duckling gets a life-changing makeover in this tale of beauty, both inside and out. Read full book review >
One Plus One by Tony Faggioli
Released: Aug. 10, 2016

"This frightening tale of a Christian heroine battling satanic forces emphasizes the power of prayer, forgiveness, and love."
A psycho killer, several cops, and a suburban mom become intertwined with angels and demons in this faith-based paranormal thriller. Read full book review >
NEVERNIGHT by Jay Kristoff
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"A sensuous, shades-of-moral-gray world; a compelling, passionate heroine; a high-stakes quest for revenge—this is a fantasy fans won't be able to put down."
A dark and bloody fantasy about a young woman bent on revenge—at almost any price. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 8, 2016

"There are several excellent stories here—and they'd be stronger if divorced from the burden of living up to the anthology's theme."
An anthology of speculative fiction through the lens of mental illness—stories of people whose mental quirks make them "outcasts and underdogs," edited by Forest (Immunity to Strange Tales, 2012) and Law (Sword and Sorceress X, 1993). Read full book review >
THE SWARM  by Orson Scott Card
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Trading heavily for verisimilitude on material established years ago by Card but just about worthwhile for series fans."
A second prequel trilogy to the child-warrior Ender's Game series (Earth Awakens, 2014, etc.) opens. This time the invading alien Formics get serious. Read full book review >
Cajun Justice by Lee R. Hadley
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"A relatively restrained, old-style yarn of supernatural retribution and redemption that may leave gore-hounds feeling a bit disappointed."
A batch of shirts bearing deadly serpents, obtained unethically by a shady businessman, spawns terror at a retailer convention in New Orleans. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >