Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 8)

THE TOURIST by Robert Dickinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"Echoes of Bradbury and Orwell, in the service of a crackerjack conspiracy plot; a seductively intriguing work of speculative fiction."
Welcome to the 21st century. Please don't feed the natives. Read full book review >
Reliant's: Price by Stephen Logsdon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"The author wisely expands his fictional and increasingly riveting futuristic universe, with room to grow."
A survivor of the first encounter with aliens in 2164 spearheads a mission to rescue a hijacked civilian ship and crew from an ostensibly aggressive species in this sci-fi tale. Read full book review >

DARKNESS AND LIGHT by Kyle Hoy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 17, 2016

"A more polished and entertaining second installment covers much of the same ground as the first."
In the second of Hoy's (Darkness and Light: Rise of the Omans, 2015) fantasy series, humans may hold the key to the survival of powerful beings from another world.Read full book review >
GOLDENHAND by Garth Nix
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A masterfully spun tale well worth the yearslong wait. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
At long last, fantasy master Nix returns to the story of Lirael. Read full book review >
BOUND BY BLOOD AND SAND by Becky Allen
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Ferocious and intelligent. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
In this intriguing epic fantasy, the magic used to control limited resources eventually corrupts the social order as well. Read full book review >

TREACHERY'S TOOLS  by L.E. Modesitt Jr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Breaks little new ground, but a solid, involving entry in a worthwhile, occasionally outstanding series."
Tenth (Madness in Solidar, 2015, etc.) in the Imager series: think an early modern France where magic, or "imaging," requires precise visualization of technique and result. We pick up the previous timeline 13 years later. Read full book review >
AHSOKA by E.K. Johnston
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A great treat for young—and not-so-young—Star Wars fans that provides a thrilling back story for a compelling character. (Science fiction. 12 & up)"
Ahsoka Tano is a Jedi on the run. Read full book review >
EXTRAORDINARY OCTOBER by Diana Wagman
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Offbeat while also incorporating themes of tolerance, October's tale will have readers rooting for her every step of the way. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
An ordinary girl, an unquenchable itch, a bizarre, spontaneously appearing flower-shaped ankle tattoo—and suddenly, four days before October Fetterhoff's 18th birthday, she begins to change. Read full book review >
THE MIDNIGHT STAR by Marie Lu
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"Like many a classic antihero's, Adelina's trajectory is both sobering and satisfying. (Fantasy. 13 & up)"
The affecting conclusion to the Young Elites trilogy relishes ardent emotion but is never mawkish. Read full book review >
MAYAN by Neil Enock
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 2016

"A high-spirited tale for readers interested in archaeology and sustainable living."
An archaeological fantasy adventure that brings one of the world's greatest mysteries into the modern political milieu. Read full book review >
Dystortions: 100 Hues of Purple by Lisa Pell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 2016

"A poignant parody of media blather, modern romance, and mangled justice, with sci-fi accents."
A novel explores extraterrestrial love in a topsy-turvy world. Read full book review >
THE FORGOTTEN FEDERATION by Fiction Factory Incorporated
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 2016

"Exuberant and entertaining, slyly avoiding camp with plausible, albeit superpower-infused, characters."
A scientist assembles a second-generation group of superheroes to battle a global government bent on dominating humanity in Fiction Factory Incorporated's debut sci-fi tale. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >