Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 9)

MAYAN by Neil Enock
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 10, 2016

"A high-spirited tale for readers interested in archaeology and sustainable living."
An archaeological fantasy adventure that brings one of the world's greatest mysteries into the modern political milieu. Read full book review >
Dystortions: 100 Hues of Purple by Lisa Pell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 2016

"A poignant parody of media blather, modern romance, and mangled justice, with sci-fi accents."
A novel explores extraterrestrial love in a topsy-turvy world. Read full book review >

THE FORGOTTEN FEDERATION by Fiction Factory Incorporated
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 2016

"Exuberant and entertaining, slyly avoiding camp with plausible, albeit superpower-infused, characters."
A scientist assembles a second-generation group of superheroes to battle a global government bent on dominating humanity in Fiction Factory Incorporated's debut sci-fi tale. Read full book review >
THE DEMON by Rick Bonogofsky
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 2016

"Short on finesse but may appeal to readers looking for something akin to the comics series Preacher."
This first in a grim fantasy series recounts a millennia-spanning grudge between an angel and a demon. Read full book review >
A CITY DREAMING by Daniel Polansky
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Anyone with even the slightest interest in genre fiction should be delighted by this whacked-out fantasy novel."
A magician returns to an alternate-universe version of New York City to settle squabbles between two warring queens, battle his nemesis, and save the world. Read full book review >

ZERO-G by William Shatner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Zero stars."
A near-future spy thriller set in space from Star Trek's Shatner (Leonard, 2016, etc.) and prolific co-writer Rovin (The Sound of Seas, 2016, etc.). Read full book review >
FEEDBACK  by Mira Grant
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"This mashup of medical and media ethics, politics and the living undead, is a whip-smart thriller overflowing with sharp ideas and social commentary."
A U.S. presidential campaign set in a zombie-infested future bears an eerie resemblance to the way we live now. Read full book review >
EXPLODED VIEW by Sam McPheeters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Though McPheeters takes a bit to find his stride (and belabors his technological exposition in the meantime), the story is worth the wait and might just leave you hesitating before taking the next reblogged video at face value."
In the Los Angeles of 2050, a detective struggles to solve a mystery that threatens her understanding of the truth in McPheeters' (The Loom of Ruin, 2012) second solo novel. Read full book review >
THE RIFT UPRISING by Amy Foster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"This fun, fast-paced thriller will entertain readers looking for their next teens-save-the-world genre fix."
Superpowered teens guarding the gateway to the multiverse...what could go wrong? Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY 2016 by Karen Joy Fowler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A set of primal, classic-seeming tales from our past, present, and future."
The second in an annual series of intellectually demanding genre anthologies. Read full book review >
ODD AND THE FROST GIANTS by Neil Gaiman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"A rare tale that values brains over brawn—light, bright, and handsomely tricked out. (Fantasy. 8 & up)"
Lavish use of black and silver ink, plus Riddell's larger-than-life figures, adds swash aplenty to this new edition of Gaiman's 2009 spin on a Norse myth, originally illustrated by Brett Helquist. Read full book review >
Telonaut by Matt Tyson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Inventive, intelligent sci-fi about humans grappling with an oceanic world."
In this debut novel, a Postbox transports future government auditor Sero Novak to a colony on a water planet. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >