Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews

THE SHADOW HOUR by Melissa Grey
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 12, 2016

"Ripe with sarcasm and complicated relationships, an action- and angst-packed installment reminiscent of Buffy and Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere. (Urban fantasy. 14 & up)"
Forces of light and darkness clash in this urban-fantasy sequel to The Girl at Midnight (2015). Read full book review >
THE CRIMSON SKEW by S.E. Grove
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 12, 2016

"A triumphant conclusion to a prodigious feat of storytelling. (Fantasy. 10 & up)"
The Mapmakers trilogy concludes with Sophia Tims still searching for her missing parents and, while she's at it, trying to prevent a cataclysmic war. Read full book review >

INVADERS by Jacob Weisman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 2016

"By their natures, anthologies are often hit and miss: there are misses aplenty here, but the hits, when they come, are solid and lingering."
A collection of 22 short stories featuring several big names of literary fiction experimenting with science-fiction themes and concepts. Read full book review >
THE DEVOURERS by Indra Das
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 2016

"Not for the squeamish, Das' debut is an ambitious, unsettling trip into our own capacity for violence."
The line between what it is to be human and what it is to be a monster is frequently blurred in Das' compelling debut novel. Read full book review >
THE BIG BOOK OF SCIENCE FICTION by Ann VanderMeer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 2016

"A necessity for those wishing to broaden their understanding of science fiction as a genre...or just those looking for some darn good stories."
A comprehensive, chronological journey through a century of seminal science fiction, compiled by the editorial team of the VanderMeers (Sisters of the Revolution: A Feminist Speculative Fiction Anthology, 2015, etc.). Read full book review >

THE STARS ASKEW by Rjurik Davidson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 2016

"Still too verbose but a decided improvement on its dazzling yet chilly predecessor."
Second installment of a fantasy series (Unwrapped Sky, 2014) about a slow-motion rebellion overtaking an ancient, decaying city in thrall to body- and brain-warping magic. Read full book review >
TIME SIEGE by Wesley Chu
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 2016

"Computer-game style: formulaic but exhilarating."
Second installment of a series (Time Salvager, 2015) in which time travelers salvage what they can from the past to help sustain a solar system ravaged by corporate wars. Read full book review >
NECESSITY by Jo Walton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 2016

"Engaging food for thought."
A trilogy which began as an almost-dry intellectual exercise ends as a glorious kitchen sink of genre, combining philosophy, time travel, aliens, and the gods. Read full book review >
THE YEAR 200 by Augustín de Rojas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 2016

"This outsized so-called classic should have stayed in the past."
In this newly translated 1990 book from de Rojas, one of Cuba's pre-eminent sci-fi writers, sleeper agents emerge from the past to wrest control of the future. Read full book review >
A WORLD WITHOUT YOU by Beth Revis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 19, 2016

"A page-turning psychological thriller in which mental illness is tragic. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
In a special school on a small Massachusetts island, a boy struggles to find his place in time. Read full book review >
THE RACE by Nina Allan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"One spectacular sci-fi novella dragged down by three tedious ones."
Four semi-intertwined novellas featuring genetically engineered dogs and a troubled family. Read full book review >
SOVEREIGNTY by Anjenique Hughes
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 19, 2016

"A well-crafted thriller that offers both a warning and hope for the future."
A dystopian sci-fi YA novel about a teenager whose unexpected discoveries hold the promise of a revolution against a totalitarian regime. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >