Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews

WANDERING STAR by Romina Russell
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"A thematically powerful ride. (Science fiction. 14 & up)"
While threats still loom after Zodiac (2014), vilified Rho must pick up the pieces.Read full book review >
SKINNER LUCE by Patricia Ward
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"High-caliber, often engrossing literary sci-fi."
Ward (The Bullet Collection, 2003) offers a tale of a woman discovering her alien origins.Read full book review >

THIS CENSUS-TAKER by China Miéville
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A deceptively simple story whose plot could be taken as a symbolic representation of an aspect of humanity as big as an entire society and as small as a single soul."
Miéville (Three Moments of an Explosion, 2015, etc.) has two main modes: the pyrotechnics of a puzzle maker and the austere depth of a mythmaker. Brief and dreamlike, his latest novel is in his simpler, stronger style.Read full book review >
THE BLUE WOODS by Nicole Maggi
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A satisfying finale. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
This final installment of the Twin Willows Trilogy finds the battle between the Benandanti and the Malandanti at a head. Read full book review >
THE DARK DAYS CLUB  by Alison Goodman
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"Readers willing to embrace the deep, deliberately paced journey will find the pace and tension increasing until the end leaves them eager for the next volume. (Historical fantasy. 13 & up)"
Regency balls, rebellious heiresses, and demonic creatures feeding on humans: not your mother's Regency romance. Read full book review >

CITY OF BLADES by Robert Jackson Bennett
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"Sometimes too talky but richly detailed and expertly plotted. A grand entertainment."
"Don't forget, it was their choice to get involved in this war": Fantasian Bennett builds another world, convincingly, in which empires rise and fall and blood flows. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 8, 2016

"Personal and cultural complexities distinguish this fresh and fascinating look at a lawless future. (Science fiction. 14 & up)"
The world's geopolitical balance rests on a genetically modified sea monster and his 17 1/2-year-old trainer. Can she resist the adrenaline rush of a pirate's life to keep the world aright? Read full book review >
MARKED by Laura Williams McCaffrey
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"An original, textured page-turner. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
Lyla is 16, and her only goal is to keep her seat in the Bright—the section of school for the smartest children—and earn the best grades so that she may go on to university one day and become an inventor. Read full book review >
BEHOLD THE BONES by Natalie C. Parker
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Shines with spooky Southern charm. (Paranormal romance. 13 & up)"
Following Beware the Wild (2014), Candy and the supernatural swamp have unfinished business.Read full book review >
BLOOD PASSAGE by Heather Demetrios
Released: March 1, 2016

"Here's hoping the third book arrives faster than a jinni can manifest a glass of spiced Arjinnan wine. (Fantasy. 15 & up)"
After three years of servitude under a greedy half-human/half-jinn master, jinni slave Nalia Aisouri'Taifyeh is free—almost. Read full book review >
The War of Words by Amy Neftzger
Released: March 3, 2016

"Engaging characters and an imaginative plot make for a satisfying read."
Neftzger's fantasy novel refreshes the conventions of the genre while meeting readers' expectations of it. Read full book review >
Outland Exile by Clark Boutwell
Released: Oct. 21, 2045

"An engrossing, imaginative dystopian thriller."
Boutwell tells the story of a young soldier navigating the chasm between two opposing societies in this sci-fi debut. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >