Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews

Wings of the Pegasus by Mark Kirsch
Released: Aug. 21, 2016

"An engaging, albeit unoriginal, premise, laid low by uninspiring storytelling."
Kirsch's debut sci-fi adventure novel tells a story set in a colossal starship containing 52 massive biospheres called Cylinders, inhabited by human colonists escaping an overpopulated Earth. Read full book review >
The Needle's Eye by Deanna Nese
Released: Sept. 8, 2016

"A tantalizing glimpse into a captivating world and an intense friendship, sure to leave readers wanting more."
The fates of two young students remain forever changed when two parallel realms intersect in this YA fantasy novel. Read full book review >

Quantum by Dean De Servienti
Released: Sept. 30, 2016

"Smart sci-fi with a much-desired object that's far more engaging than the average MacGuffin."
Various agencies hunt six scientists who've gone into hiding after unearthing an ancient artifact of indeterminate origin in De Servienti's (Life Turns, 2016, etc.) sci-fi thriller.Read full book review >
Game Over by Derek Edgington
Released: Sept. 26, 2016

"Lots of sci-fi twists and turns, some more believable than others, lead to a galvanizing finish."
The latest novel by Edgington (Immortal, 2016) features a rogue artificial intelligence and a virtual reality world holding 12 billion trapped souls.Read full book review >
Blowback '07 by Brian Meehl
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A vibrant time-travel tale that offers inventive storytelling along with sports, romance, and secrets."
A YA adventure finds a high school football star stuck in the past thanks to a mysterious musical instrument. Read full book review >

SILVER STARS by Michael Grant
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"Exhaustive research, immersive storytelling, and emotional depth make for a superlative tale. (glossary, bibliography) (Alternate history. 14 & up)"
RECLUCE TALES by L.E. Modesitt Jr.
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"Don't expect great significance everywhere—some of the pieces are no more than vignettes—but Modesitt is excellent company, and the more familiar you are with the series, the richer these stories will seem."
A collection of 17 new and three reprinted stories plus an essay, weaving among the prolific Modesitt's impressive 18-book (and counting) fantasy Saga of Recluse (Heritage of Cyador, 2014, etc.). Read full book review >
MARTIANS ABROAD by Carrie Vaughn
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"Reading far more like a book for young teenagers than one with a strictly adult audience, this easygoing adventure has an affable appeal."
Vaughn (Dreams of the Golden Age, 2014, etc.) offers a stand-alone that finds a Martian colonist struggling to adapt to life on Earth. Read full book review >
Telonaut by Matt Tyson
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Inventive, intelligent sci-fi about humans grappling with an oceanic world."
In this debut novel, a Postbox transports future government auditor Sero Novak to a colony on a water planet. Read full book review >
Ave, Caesarion by Deborah L. Davitt

"A scorching alternate-history adventure packed with romance and fantasy action."
Davitt (TheGoddess Embraced, 2015, etc.), the author of The Saga of Edda-Earth novels, begins a new fantasy series about the "god-born" son of Caesar and Cleopatra.Read full book review >
Tinder & Flint by Matthew Hinsley
Released: July 29, 2016

"A delightful tale of magic and monsters that subverts genre expectations with characters both familiar and equivocal."
A group on a self-imposed mission to track down abducted villagers winds up battling deadly creatures and an evil of unspeakable power in this series-opening debut fantasy. Read full book review >
Joseph Van Pearce and the Prophecy of the Dragon's Head Medallion by C.C. Brampton
Released: March 6, 2016

"A worthwhile adventure just beginning, with potential for further mystery and suspense."
Brampton kicks off his debut fantasy series with a 15-year-old boy following a series of riddles, courtesy of his grandfather, leading him to an otherworldly medallion. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >