Science & Technology Book Reviews

HOMO DEUS by Yuval Noah Harari
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A relentlessly fascinating book that is sure to become—and deserves to be—a bestseller."
In an intellectually provocative follow-up to Sapiens (2015), Harari (History/Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem) looks to the future. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A fine biography of a man who played an essential role in post-World War II American science and deserves to be better known."
The life and work of "an expert in technology" who is largely forgotten outside the world of physics. Read full book review >

EXTREME MEASURES by Jessica Nutik Zitter
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Clarity and compassion unite in this touching and convincing new conversation on comfortable, patient-centered end-of-life care."
End-stage patient suffering and distress inspire an early-career watershed moment for a sympathetic physician. Read full book review >
CONVERGENCE by Peter Watson
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Those who reject the idea of convergence outright may not get far in this book, but readers with no objection to a sweeping, entirely fascinating history of science during the last 200 years will find an abundance of enlightening material."
The journalist and polymath delivers a delightful exploration of "the deepest idea in the universe." Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A jargon-heavy, superficial primer on altered states tuned to a specific audience."
Two researchers survey the various ways that human beings alter their consciousness to improve performance. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"An unsettling but informative and sometimes-optimistic view of mostly legitimate efforts at life extension."
An enlightening tour of transhumanism, the movement dedicated to radically prolonging human life. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A thoroughly researched, clearly presented book that suggests that imprecise brain science will become increasingly more common as evidence in criminal cases."
American Bar Association Journal editor Davis (Defending the Damned: Inside Chicago's Cook County Public Defender's Office, 2007, etc.) engagingly explores how sophisticated brain studies might help explain the causes of violent crimes. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Solid research into the dilemmas regarding genetic screening and how it is used for fetuses and newborns."
When scientific ability and human desire coalesce into a potent tool that can profoundly change life. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"A sharp analysis of an increasingly pressing problem, but Nichols falls short of proposing a satisfying solution."
Some fresh twists on a familiar theme: the dumbing down of America amid the defiant distrust of expertise. Read full book review >
THE DEATH AND LIFE OF THE GREAT LAKES by Dan Egan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"Not light reading but essential for policymakers—and highly recommended for the 40 million people who rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water."
An alarming account of the "slow-motion catastrophe" facing the world's largest freshwater system. Read full book review >
THINKING MACHINES by Luke Dormehl
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 7, 2017

"Not everyone approves. Dormehl lets critics have their say but makes a convincing, often disturbing, but always-entertaining case that that we're in for a wild ride."
A history of artificial intelligence and look at the "dazzling (near) future, the changes that lurk just around the corner, and how they will transform our lives forever." Read full book review >
INFERNO by Steven Hatch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Despite occasional long-windedness, Hatch's analysis is intelligent, nuanced, and tempered, a necessary departure from the panicked response of most American media outlets."
An American doctor describes his experiences in Liberia during the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 14, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >