Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 162)

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"Thanks to elegant prose and straightforward approach, the 'hard science' in this tale of bio-archaeology's coming of age remains well within the grasp of the layman."
An engaging and well-written account of the scientific underpinnings that inspired Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"An intellectual accomplishment that illuminates the magic and the wisdom of the heavens above."
Polymath Gleiser (Natural Philosophy, Physics, and Astronomy/Dartmouth) puts his eclectic résumé to good use in this exploration of how religious and scientific views of life and death come together in the skies. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 20, 2001

"Fleming's contributions to history are too often lost in such minutiae, and only the most dogged reader is likely to reach the story's end."
A middling entry in the run of recent books on calendars, meridians, and like inventions. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 6, 2001

"A varied, insightful collection, albeit one steeped in scientific arcana, this will appeal to a select few."
A comprehensible, inviting journey into the inner lives of scientists and the relation of the "merely personal" to outsized realms of thought, from chess computers to cosmology. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 3, 2001

"An intriguing study for skeptics and believers alike."
Science meets religion meets good writing. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"A lively work on a somewhat arcane topic, and an important prehistory of our environmentally conscious, biologically threatened era."
An engrossing, unusual social narrative, documenting the close ties between chemical weapons development and "peaceful" applications in insect warfare. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"Splendid exposition, accessible to the mathematically challenged as well as the mathematically inclined."
Halfway through this articulate and droll history of math and physics, you wonder: Who is this guy with the unpronounceable name you want to recommend to all your friends? Read full book review >
MENDELEYEV’S DREAM by Paul Strathern
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2001

"Crisp, provocative entertainment for armchair scientists, and a solid survey for more serious readers."
A nimble chronological history of the transformation of sorcery and superstition into chemistry. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"A magical mystery tour made comprehensible and exhilarating by McCrone's erudition and impressive expository gifts. (8 pages color photographs)"
A science-writer reviews the theories and research that have produced the current view of the brain as a dynamic structure with only superficial resemblances to a digital computer. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"Even so, Stille is an exemplary reporter, and he offers here just the thing to add to a history buff's stack of bedside reading."
On deteriorating masterpieces, disintegrating temples, declining Latin, and other markers of the race to save history from humanity. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"Many won't buy the human dignity thesis or dystopian nightmares, but credit the author for laying out how we got to this pass and why we need to act."
To clone or not to clone? asks social philosopher Fukuyama (The Great Disruption, 1999, etc.) in his latest disquisition on science and society. Read full book review >
THE EXACT LOCATION OF THE SOUL by Richard Selzer
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 1, 2001

"Nonetheless, a passionate, unsentimental celebration of life's messiness, whether on an operating table or at a dining table."
In this eloquent collection of essays, five new, the rest previously published, writer/surgeon Selzer (Raising the Dead, 1994) explores spirit and substance, flesh and feeling, pain and epiphany. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >