Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 162)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 8, 1998

"A fascinating cross-section of history. (Author tour)"
Time flows inevitably, but the calendar is a human institution—and its history is a colorful mix of science, whim, and pure chance. Read full book review >
MANAGING MARTIANS by Donna Shirley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 4, 1998

"Never say die! (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) ($65,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
To paraphrase the old soap opera: Can a rich girl from a small Oklahoma town find success and happiness married to her job as first woman manager of a NASA space program? Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 1, 1998

"A sobering look at the power of early influences to affect the development of a healthy mind—and ultimately a healthy society."
An expert in early brain development offers a timely reminder of the importance of human relationships in shaping the minds of the very young. Read full book review >
BORN THAT WAY by William Wright
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 16, 1998

"The book leaves one wishing to hear less from polemicists rooting for or against genes and more from scientists striving to find out exactly what genes do. (Author tour)"
An enthusiastic, informative account of the young field of behavioral genetics that could use less of the reporter and more of the subject. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 15, 1998

"More of a —greatest hits— of madmen than a measured look at madness and genius."
A haphazardly assembled collection of profiles of inventors, philosophers, writers, artists, and just plain brilliant madmen. Read full book review >

A GENTLE PLEA FOR CHAOS by Mirabel Osler
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1998

"Osler's thinking is original, intuitive, and sharp as a tack; as a gardening writer she rightly sits up there with Henry Mitchell and Eleanor Perenyi."
Osler's plea is not so gentle; rather, it's opinionated (though never dismissive), bell-clear, wickedly humorous, brilliant—a call for cultivated anarchy in the garden that turns an oxymoron into a sensuous, sensible act. Read full book review >
LIFE SIGNS by Robert Jenkins
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1998

"Entertaining and informative, worth reading even by non-Trekkies. (For another look at Star Trek, see Jeff Greenwald, Future Perfect, p. 712.)"
Here's another—probably not the last—in the recent batch of books explaining modern science by referring to popular sci-fi shows. Read full book review >
THE ECOLOGY OF EDEN by Evan Eisenberg
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1998

"Huge, unformed, half-baked, and often interesting, this is the basis for a fine book—but not that book itself."
An unsuccessful synthesis of the natural history of mankind, and of the history of mankind in nature, —real and imagined.— Eisenberg examines scientific, historical, anthropological, and theological ideas of the ways in which humans fit in to the natural world, from the ancient myth of the Garden of Eden to the medieval great chain of being and modern notions of deep ecology and bioregionalism. Read full book review >
A FIELD GUIDE TO THE INVISIBLE by Wayne Biddle
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1998

"Biddle's book adds up to little more than an assemblage of scientific and cultural factoids and gross-out trivia—which makes it just right for bright teenagers of an inquiring bent, and for collectors of useless information everywhere. (b&w illustrations, not seen)"
A resoundingly fun if sometimes unappetizing inquiry into the world of microbes, germs, and other invisible but influential phenomena. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 1998

"Brin's writing is eclectic, wandering and fun. Some of what he says is, well, crackpot. But Brin is also no anarchistic dreamer, no 'cypher punk,' as he puts it. The transparent, unregulated future of freedom is only a possibility, a result of long processes of experimentation and gained wisdom."
Self-described crackpot and prolific science-fiction writer Brin (Infinity's Shore, 1996, etc.) ponders the technological threats to and possibilities for freedom in the not-too-distant future. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1998

"His well-written overview eyes the larger questions implicit in the subject."
Has human engineering improved on nature? Read full book review >
THE MIND'S PAST by Michael S. Gazzaniga
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1998

"An intriguing theory, assertively stated, but often Gazzaniga's arguments seem too reductive or dogmatic to be convincing. (12 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
Adding to a growing genre that purports to say how mind arises from brain, a study that is short and witty but not entirely convincing. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Melissa Sweet
author of SOME WRITER!
September 26, 2016

“SOME PIG,” Charlotte the spider’s praise for Wilbur, is just one fondly remembered snippet from E. B. White’s Charlotte’s Web. In Some Writer!, two-time Caldecott Honor winner and 2014 Kirkus Prize finalist Melissa Sweet mixes White’s personal letters, photos, and family ephemera with her own exquisite artwork to tell his story, from his birth in 1899 to his death in 1985. Budding young writers will be fascinated and inspired by the journalist, New Yorker contributor, and children’s book author who loved words his whole life. This authorized tribute is the first fully illustrated biography of E. B. White and includes an afterword by Martha White, E. B. White's granddaughter. “Like Charlotte, Sweet spins a terrific story,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A masterful biography that will enchant young readers.” View video >