Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 162)

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 11, 1997

"Strong scientific support for the mind-body school of medicine, sure to rankle those alpha males back in the labs. (Author tour)"
Pert, a self-described ``catalyst in the mindbodyspirit revolution in modern medical science,'' and once a chief of brain chemistry at the NIH, freely intermingles vibrant stories of her professional and personal life with her theories about neuropeptides. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Highly recommended for geographers and students of the American scene. (51 illustrations, not seen)"
A large and varied sampler of essays by the late doyen of American cultural geography, who died in 1996. Read full book review >

SMELL by Piet Vroon
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"As for the rest, there are enough tidbits and food for thought to please the curious mind."
Everything you wanted to know about one of the two ``chemical'' senses, including the fact that taste is as much a function of smell as it is of taste buds. Read full book review >
PLANET QUEST by Ken Croswell
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A thoroughly readable addition to the astronomy bookshelf. (illustrations)"
A lively, timely history of the search for extrasolar planets- -today's hottest astronomical game. Read full book review >
BEFORE THE BEGINNING by Martin Rees
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A strong and entertaining introduction to modern cosmology, by someone who has been close to the center of the debate. (Author tour)"
Astrophysicists and cosmologists play their mind games on the biggest of all boards—the entire known universe. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Bush remains, as this biography demonstrates, a complex, deeply controversial, and profoundly influential figure."
Disproving Vannevar Bush's claim that any biography of him would be terrible, Zachary (Show-Stopper!, 1994), a reporter for the Wall Street Journal, deftly follows the life and career of the single most important scientist working for the US during WW II. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 15, 1997

"Unfortunately, his organization is somewhat disjointed and he often omits background information that the lay reader might need to follow his argument. (color and b&w photos, charts, graphs, not seen)"
Claims of Martian life continue to spur scientific debate; this partisan account summarizes the arguments to date. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"So the mix of sex and politics is ever-present, and Blum's book is a fine reminder of how inevitable—for better or worse— that mix seems to be. (Author tour)"
To the growing genre of gender-behavior books, add Pulitzer Prize winner Blum's (The Monkey Wars, 1994) take on sex differences. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Not easy going by any means, but worth the work for anyone interested in the thought processes of a scientist on the leading edge of his discipline."
One major school of quantum theory posits a multiplicity of universes; but what does that imply about the reality we live in? Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"A solid contribution to popular geography."
A discursive look at the ongoing transformation of the American landscape. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"McGowan closes with a macabre little endpiece on the deceptive tranquillity of an English garden that, while truly black of humor, adds a surprising fillip to the lecture. (line art)"
A schoolmasterish exposition on prey/predator survival techniques from University of Toronto zoologist McGowan. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Not for the squeamish, but possibly the perfect gift for a science-minded teenager. (photos, not seen)"
What this volume reveals about the everyday world we live in may shatter forever the equanimity with which you regard the bed you lie on, the air you breathe, or even your loved ones. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >