Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 162)

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 8, 2002

"A story of dreams and delusions, with more than a soupçon of the pathetic tossed in."
Weil captures the benign madness as Gary Hudson tries to build the first civilian spacecraft. Read full book review >
DEATH by Herbie Brennan
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Readers who can't stay awake for Art Bell's late-night radio excursions into the paranormal can find the same material here."
The author of Emily and the Werewolf (1993) offers another collection of paranormal weirdness in an investigation of mortality that surveys everything from dominant world religions to out-there occult theories. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Desowitz makes science scintillating, but his message is dead serious: It's not just bio-terrorists we need to be concerned about. (8 illustrations, not seen)"
Another idiosyncratic jaunt through the world of tropical diseases from the author of Who Gave Pinta to the Santa Maria? (1997). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"A very welcome, highly readable contribution to intellectual history."
A lucid portrait of like-minded if very different Brits who worked, schemed, and conversed the Industrial Revolution into motion. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"A rich, sophisticated argument that may leave pious souls a little uneasy."
The well-published MIT cognitive scientist and linguist (How the Mind Works, 1997, etc.) takes on one of philosophy's thorniest problems in this lucid view of what makes humans human. Read full book review >

ROSALIND FRANKLIN by Brenda Maddox
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"At once a scientific exploration and a personal history, Maddox's biography is inviting and ultimately satisfying. (16 pages b&w photos)"
This engagingly direct biography of Franklin encapsulates her vital contributions to science and in particular the deciphering of DNA while providing a durable portrait of a forceful personality. Read full book review >
THE HOUSE by Stephen Gardiner
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 13, 2002

"A fine train of architectural thought that needs airing and a bit more sunlight in order to gain a wide audience. (112 photographs and drawings)"
A dry historical survey of the forces and influences that have shaped what we call home. Read full book review >
THE LOST DINOSAURS OF EGYPT by William Nothdurft
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 10, 2002

"Despite a lot of gravy and garnishes, there's not much here but the bones."
A mildly captivating but ultimately scattered account of the vicissitudes of fossil hunting. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 9, 2002

"Not everything you need to know to get into med school, but enough to inspire appreciation of the wisdom of the body and perhaps lead a student to want to learn more."
A short primer on human physiology by Widmaier, who previously explained Why Geese Don't Get Obese (and We Do) (not reviewed). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 9, 2002

"Thoughtful and important."
The dramatic story of physicists who put science at the service of the state, with momentous results for themselves and the world. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE WRITING 2002 by Matt Ridley
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 6, 2002

"Year to year, this science series has become something of a treasured literary institution, and Ridley gives us yet another jewel."
Annual selection of some of the country's most illuminating recent popular-science articles. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2002

"An effective tribute to an innovator unjustly overshadowed by his litigious peers."
Shulman moves on from polemical exposé (Owning the Future: Staking Claims on the Knowledge Frontier, 1999) to polemical biography, profiling a nearly forgotten aviation pioneer whose story proves that even when men were men, there were still lawyers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >