Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 162)

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 24, 2000

"Unfortunately, Cooper has bitten off more than she can chew, and the effectiveness of her many food-related messages is weakened by a lack of focus."
A concerned chef puts the food supply under scrutiny and comes up with some bad news about what's wrong with the way we're growing our food and eating it too. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 24, 2000

"Full of interesting, often useful insights, but the author's straining for universal significance seems hubristic. Take with several grains of salt."
The author postulates that all creatures are parts of a worldwide "learning machine" that has evolved since the beginning of the universe. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Loaded with computer jargon and acronyms, this is a story told with gusto by a knowledgeable devotee—but for computer illiterates outside cubicle farms, accessibility will be limited."
There's no free lunch, but there is abundant free source-code software out there in the ether. Perhaps you have no idea what "source code" is. You will get just the sketchiest of notions here, hidden in a thoroughgoing description of the movement to spread the thing around. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Jenkins does a fine job of threading Cody's personal saga into the histories of the Wild West and world aviation, weaving a pleasingly reader-friendly narrative."
A rollicking, consistently surprising biography of an American cowboy who, in an unlikely turn of history, ended his life a hero of British aviation. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"An intelligent, invective-free discussion of the issues that should be welcomed by consumers confused by the claims and charges of both sides in the current debate."
A frank, fair, and highly informative discussion of the risks and benefits of genetically modified foods. Read full book review >

BLAZE by Nicholas Faith
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"'Where there's smoke, there's fire,' the saying goes. But not here. (8 pp. color photos)"
A surprisingly dull description of techniques that investigators employ to determine the causes of fires. Read full book review >
THE FUTURE OF FOOD by Brian J. Ford
NON-FICTION
Released: July 31, 2000

"A provocative if somewhat unfocused look at a subject near and dear to everyone."
Even for those who rarely think beyond their next meal, food is an inescapable part of the future. Here, a British biologist tries to foretell what's likely to end up on our table in years to come. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 31, 2000

"For the most part, Porritt views science as arrogant, lacking in compassion, not open to public participation or scrutiny, and far from holistic. Leaving aside what scientists themselves might say in response, one wonders whether such accusations will do any good in the end."
An attack on the "medical-industrial" complex by a British environmentalist who was the director of Friends of the Earth from 1984 to 1990. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 28, 2000

"A comprehensive and remarkably well-written overview of this key event in recent history."
A brief history of the Internet, told by a British engineer and journalist. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 18, 2000

"An ill-digested mix, although not without its felicities."
Here's an urban legend that turns out to be true: the pathologist who autopsied Albert Einstein kept his brain, and magazine journalist Paterniti spent a nutty couple of weeks with him, ferrying it to California. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 4, 2000

"Essential for experts or, shall we say, believers. For casual readers, a curiosity."
A painstaking and often specious study of the astrological implications of Washington, DC, architecture. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2000

Having taught the popular course Astronomy Bizarre at the University of Texas for 25 years, Wheeler has turned it into a popular book. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >