Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 162)

WRINKLES IN TIME by George Smoot
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 19, 1993

A nova-burst of fine astronomy writing, as physicist Smoot and San Francisco Examiner science writer Davidson tell the story behind the discovery of the cosmic ``seeds,'' implanted by the Big Bang, that grew into galaxies, planets, and us. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 17, 1993

"Suffused with the sense of wonder that unites the wide-eyed child and the white-haired Nobel laureate: an uncommonly good collection. (Twenty illustrations)"
Twenty-four shapely essays, most drawn from American Scientist, by paleoichthyologist Thomson (Living Fossil, 1991), president of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 15, 1993

"A magisterial study of an awesome and intriguing public career. (Photographs)"
In 1970, organic chemist, Harvard president, and nuclear- weapons mandarin Conant published a ponderous and unrevealing autobiography, My Several Lives. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Okay science popularizing—but nearly indistinguishable from dozens of other books on the subject."
From physicist and science writer Morris (The Edges of Science, 1990, etc.): a nontechnical introduction to recent developments in cosmology. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Rheingold's central point is that there's a revolution taking place on-line; with this thoughtful, supportive critique, he's continuing his fair bid to be its Tom Paine."
An enthusiastic tour of cyberspace by one of its pioneers. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A one-sided, rather stiff telling of a tale that—as a paradigm of grass-roots activism—has needed to be told: Now, if only a Roger Caras or a Cleveland Amory would tell it again, with style. (Photographs—not seen)"
Where does an 800-pound gorilla sit? Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 13, 1993

"The very fact that she and others have enriched the record by their scholarly exposÇs, however, offers hope for the future."
Much has been written about discrimination against women in science, including assertions that brain size and temperament precluded their ability to study and succeed. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 13, 1993

In a readable departure from the mass of business books, technological futurist Burrus invites seven fictional characters to enjoy a week of after-dinner card games, where they learn profitably to use his business axioms and predictions by playing them as winning cards in a postindustrial form of poker. Read full book review >
QUARRY by Noel T. Boaz
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 12, 1993

"Peppery, informative bones of contention."
``Have they found it?'' will be the query of most readers. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 12, 1993

"Some heavy going in the inevitable discussions of the scientific evidence—but, on the whole, compelling and readable."
Sarasohn, a Washington-based journalist for Legal Times, turns her attention to the notorious case in which a team led by Nobel laureate David Baltimore (Physiology, 1975) published a scientific paper later exposed as being built on fabricated data. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 5, 1993

"First Principles'' of modernism—which he celebrates in the conclusion of this powerful and outspoken book. (Ninety illustrations)"
In a personal tour of modern architecture and the colorful, eccentric, clannish men (all men)—mostly displaced Europeans- -responsible for it, Blake (Curator for Architecture and Industrial Design/Museum of Modern Art; Form Follows Fiasco, 1977, etc.—not reviewed) recovers the energy, vision, and dedication that he says characterized the profession in the decades following WW II. Read full book review >
RACE TO THE MOON by William B. Breuer
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Crackerjack war adventures—and, in this case, the moon's the limit. (Twenty-nine photographs—not seen)"
Another smasher by Breuer, who specializes in thrilling reports of WW II spycraft and warfare (Geronimo!, Sea Wolf, Hitler's Undercover War—all 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >