Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 162)

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Ocean''—and, thanks to the author's down-to-earth style, a pleasure to read."
A fact-finding tour of troubled waters. Read full book review >
THE ASCENT OF SCIENCE by Brian Silver
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Silver has given us one of the most stimulating overviews of science in recent years. (illustrations, not seen)"
This pleasing volume undertakes—with considerable success- -to chart the broad history of science from the Renaissance to the end of the 20th century. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"In sum, lots of good ideas, telling examples, and even amusing trivia that point to the importance of math, yet without revealing how mathematicians work. (line art)"
A short paean to mathematics in the vein of Cole's earlier volume, Sympathetic Vibrations (1984), which explored creativity, art, and beauty in relation to physics. Read full book review >
ORIGINS by Hubert Reeves
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"A useful though not especially deep summary of the current state of knowledge in three key areas of science."
A series of interviews with three French-based scientists presents current theories on the origins of the world we see around us, of life itself, and of our own species. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 17, 1997

"Even if one cares little for Gleiser's spiritual asides, this is an exceptionally clear summary of 2,500 years of science and a fascinating account of the ways in which it often does intersect with spiritual beliefs. (30 b&w drawings, not seen)"
An attempt to bridge the gap between spiritual and scientific inquiries into the nature and origins of the universe, from a physics professor at Dartmouth. Read full book review >

THE SECRET MESA by Jo Ann Shroyer
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 14, 1997

"A solid piece of reporting on a little-viewed corner of national life."
A thorough, sometimes unsettling look at the culture of nuclear science. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 12, 1997

"Perhaps because Krauss shares the public's affection for the pop sources he consults, his book will entertain and instruct general readers without insulting the scientifically literate. ($75,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Many scientists say that reading science fiction inspired them to launch their careers. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"It should be especially good for young people."
One is tempted to say this book tells you everything you wanted to know about sex but were afraid to ask—except that no one is afraid to ask these days, and we are all but surfeited by the amount of public telling. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

The origins of humankind have inspired endless speculation in myth, religion, philosophy, and science. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"But overall, the essays are grave excursions on matters of life and death, truth and falsity, by one who has endured life in Eastern Europe and, because he is a scientist, retains a belief that progress is possible."
Add a new voice to the medical-literary essay genre: Holub is a Czech immunologist and poet, distinguished in both fields. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"An effective marriage of text and photographs, and a succinct portrait of a decent man and a remarkable scientist. (Book-of-the-Month Club featured selection; History Book Club alternate selection)"
Great inventors tend to become so closely identified with their most famous invention that their very lives become obscured. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"There is something here for nearly anyone who appreciates graceful, seasoned, casual wisdom."
More short takes (40 of them) from polymath biophysicist Morowitz (Entropy and the Magic Flute, 1993), ensconced now on the faculty at George Mason University in Virginia. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >