Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 163)

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Readers more interested in substance than glamour—and willing to follow their guide through some rocky terrain—will be rewarded."
A thoughtful exploration of the ``deep structure'' similarities between the intellectual graces of music and mathematics. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Possibly the best popular treatment to date of the most glamorous and least understood of the biological sciences."
A lively and wide-ranging book about the accomplishments and aspirations of genetics and those who study it. Read full book review >

PALE BLUE DOT by Carl Sagan
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Nevertheless, Sagan will once again dazzle readers with his brilliance and breadth of vision. (Photos and illustrations, not seen) (Author tour)"
This logical successor to Cosmos (1980) offers the characteristic Sagan blueprint for humankind's long-term vitality. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 11, 1994

"Presented in a postmodern stew of text and image, this Catalog is like a Table of Contents to the Zeitgeist—or the coolest Yellow Pages around."
Nietzsche was right when he spoke of eternal return. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 9, 1994

"Kids will love the ingenious three-dimensional objects that slip out of various enclosures and dangle from strings; grownups may find that they finally understand the principles of trigonometryor at least that puzzling them out is a lot more fun with visual aids."
British math instructor Gardner and designer Van der Meer (Your Amazing Senses, 1987) give us a magnificently produced volumemore like a game book than an instructional manualthat might amuse even the most die-hard math-hater. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 2, 1994

"An often exciting look at frontiers of biology beyond the well-tilled fields of gene research. (68 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
It may come as a surprise that there are still scientific dissenters from Darwinism, but here's the proof, in a book that calls on biologists to put organisms, not molecules, at the center of the science. Read full book review >
ANCIENT INVENTIONS by Peter James
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"With drawings and photographs. (Quality Paperback Book Club selection)"
Not just an inventory of gizmos and whatsits, this is a responsible attempt by two British archaeologists (Centuries of Darkness, not reviewed) to construct an overview of science and technology in various cultures before 1492. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"A challenging examination of a central problem of modern philosophy, with no final answers but plenty of food for thought. (76 line drawings) (First printing of 50,000; $50,000 ad/promo)"
A leading critic of artificial intelligence research returns to the attack, attempting to lay the groundwork for an analysis of the true nature of intelligence. Read full book review >
THE MONKEY WARS by Deborah Blum
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"But she brings the issues into sharp, disturbing focus."
A penetrating look at the bitter controversy between animal rights activists and research scientists over the use of monkeys and chimpanzees in medical research. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"All the same, his case studies, autobiographical anecdotes, and guidance on how to deal with sleep problems without drugs will intrigue many readers and possibly provide relief to others."
A prominent neurophysiologist explains his theories about the brain's chemistry and how it affects our conscious (and unconscious) activities. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Not just for the morbidly curious."
A lively narrative that illuminates the science of forensic anthropology. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

From historian and former Librarian of Congress Boorstin (The Creators, 1992, etc.), 17 sparkling and erudite essays that ``explore some of the surprising novelties and unexpected continuities in our recent past.'' Boorstin is a magnificent anachronism: He still believes in the essential goodness of the American experiment, and as an amateur rather than professional historian, he prefers straightforward narratives on grand themes rather than narrowly focused, footnote-laden quarrels with musty academics. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Libba Bray
author of LAIR OF DREAMS
August 25, 2015

In Lair of Dreams, the second installment of Libba Bray’s bestselling young adult Diviners series, after a supernatural showdown with a serial killer, Evie O'Neill has outed herself as a Diviner. Now that the world knows of her ability to "read" objects, and therefore, read the past, she has become a media darling, earning the title "America's Sweetheart Seer." But not everyone is so accepting of the Diviners' abilities....Meanwhile, mysterious deaths have been turning up in the city, victims of an unknown sleeping sickness. Can the Diviners descend into the dreamworld and catch a killer? “Weaving together a chilling mystery with a truly elusive solution, several poignant love stories, agonizing injustice, terrifyingly monstrous dreams, and even a cameo by legendary psychiatrist Carl Jung, this installment wraps enough up to satisfy but clearly sets the stage for more,” our reviewer writes in a rare starred review. “How will readers stand the wait?” View video >