Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 163)

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"AIDS research, always with a strong humanitarian underpinning."
The autobiography of a virology pioneer, the natural history of HIV/AIDS, and the story of the effort to combat the disease, all intertwined in an entertaining and enlightening package. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"A textbook case of how not to manage an environmental disaster. (5 line drawings, 7 maps)"
One man's struggle to rid the Mediterranean of invading algae that have now spread from France to the coasts of Spain, Italy, and even Croatia. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

Captured he wasn't, yet captivated Achenbach surely is, not only by the scientific search for extraterrestrial life, but also by the nonscientific convictions of true believers in aliens. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 27, 1999

"Whither, indeed! ($125,000 ad/promo; author tour; radio satellite tour)"
Super trend spotter and premier historian of future events Naisbitt (Megatrends, 1982, etc.) and his co-authors (his daughter and artist Philips) examine trends in nascent technology and find much portentous material. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 15, 1999

THE UNIVERSE, THE ELEVENTH DIMENSION, AND EVERYTHINGWhat We Know and How We Know ItMorris, Richard Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 6, 1999

"For the open-minded, however, this is a breathtaking feat of scholarship that will have enduring value as an encyclopedic source of hard data and inspired speculation. (Photos, not seen)"
An extraordinary body of scholarship that is as much a social and psychological history of women as child-bearers—and more—as a review of male and female biology and behavior across many species, particularly kindred primates. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 4, 1999

"While the actual math is heavy going, Aczel gives a very readable account of the science and the scientists involved."
In 1912, Albert Einstein wrote down an equation that describes the structure of the universe. Read full book review >
FRENCH DNA by Paul Rabinow
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Part play-by-play of the internal struggles of a prominent genetics research facility in France, part abstract philosophical debate on genetic issues, this half-baked case study meanders too far off course for its narrative aspirations."
The dated story of a genetics research endeavor in the early 1990s as recounted by anthropologist Rabinow (UC Berkeley). Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Of most interest to fans, but the science is still solid. (Author tour)"
TV's popular X-Files, criticized for peddling woo-woo ideas, is actually careful to preserve scientific accuracy'so says the show's science consultant. Read full book review >
THE ETERNAL TRAIL by Martin Lockley
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 10, 1999

"An adroit chronology of the art of tracking and the revelations that trail in its wake. (illustrations)"
Lockley (Tracking Dinosaurs, not reviewed) takes an informed, latitudinarian look at fossil footprints, spoor, and other traces left by passing animals, including humans, to see what they can tell us about everything from science to spirituality. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 9, 1999

"What he has to say about infection, cancer, aging, and genome research carries a sufficient weight of scientific wisdom by itself to bear attending—on the art of policymakers, health professionals, and the public itself."
Marry Freud to brain circuitry and use that linkage to indict modern biomedical science: this is the aim of Pollack, former Columbia College dean, now professor of biological sciences in this intense, provocative volume. Read full book review >
FASTER by James Gleick
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 9, 1999

"Well worth your time."
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >