Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 163)

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 2001

A corrective to Frankenfood alarmists: Genetic engineering of plants and animals has been going on for millennia, thanks to humankind's tinkering. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 11, 2001

"A fine addition to the sparse library of engineering histories."
Eight great American engineering achievements will be the subject of a major PBS series in 2002. Traditionally, publishers commission a densely illustrated coffee-table book to accompany such a show: here, happily, is a superior example of the genre. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2001

"An engaging history, especially appropriate for travel enthusiasts."
An ardent, readable history, by British travel writer and biographer Botting (Gerald Durrell, 1999, etc.), traces the rise and fall (or self-immolation) of Zeppelin travel. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE AND NATURE WRITING 2001 by Edward O. Wilson
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 10, 2001

"An illuminating, if somewhat slanted, cross-section of current ideas in the sciences."
Second in the series, again limited in scope. Read full book review >
SPUTNIK by Paul Dickson
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 4, 2001

"An excellent treatment of one of the early chapters of the Cold War."
The devastating impact of a Soviet satellite on the American public in the '50s. Read full book review >

CREATION by Steve Grand
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Smoothly written and thought-provoking—worth a look for anyone curious about computer intelligence. (14 line drawings)"
The latest word on computer intelligence, from the designer of a popular computer game. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"A fascinating picture of a scientist whose distinguished career deserves to be better known."
The awe-inspiring aurora borealis was, appropriately, first explained by a Norwegian scientist, whose story Jago sets forth. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"It's impossible to say whether the social side of Buchanan's fatalistic thesis will prove elaborately wrong, though he argues it with fervor and elegance."
Buchanan, a writer for Nature and a theoretical physicist, summarizes the law of universality, a sweeping concept that is very much a work in progress. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Uneven, but pleasurable overall for the stimulation of being in the presence of a nimble mind."
In 23 previously published articles and miscellaneous speeches, which span 15 years, the Nobel Prize-winning particle physicist takes up arms against a sea of post-modernists, religionists, mystics, and even some liberal critics of modern science. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Neither plaything nor conceit, Monninger's rural idyll is very much a lived experience: genuine, well-earned, and downright enviable."
Monninger (Mather, 1995, etc.) moves upcountry to transform, on a shoestring, a big barn into a home, with the intent of setting down roots—no precious venture this. Read full book review >
OUR COSMIC HABITAT by Martin Rees
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"A provocative survey of modern cosmology for readers who want the big picture."
Einstein once asked whether God could have made the world any differently; here, Rees, England's Astronomer Royal, offers an answer. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"As entertaining as a three-ring circus, and as scholarly as any intellectually curious lay reader would wish for. (Line drawings by the author)"
More lucid science writing from Ellis (Imaging Atlantis, 1998, etc.), who this time cuts a broad swath through the history of marine animals. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >