Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 163)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"And if you find yourself looking around and marveling at what you see, wondering who the heck ever thought of that, then Lindsay has done his job."
This compilation of Lindsay's long-running New York Press column on inventions blends P.G. Wodehouse's freewheeling joy in the absurd with Orson Welles's razor-sharp social commentary. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Entertaining and well-written—possibly the clearest popular treatment to date of this complex subject."
Superstring theory may provide the long-sought unification of physics for which Einstein sought in vain. Read full book review >

OPEN SKIES, CLOSED MINDS by Nick Pope
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 27, 1999

"An odd, unconvincing statement of belief from a government official. (8 pages b&w photos)"
As a career civil servant with Britain's Ministry of Defence, Pope served a three-year stint in the early 1990s as chief investigator of UFO sightings in the United Kingdom. Read full book review >
OF FLIES, MICE, AND MEN by François Jacob
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 15, 1999

"If the likes of Jacob remain, there's hope."
A writer of style and substance narrates the transforming events of recent biology in seven inspired essays, neatly translated by Weiss. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 5, 1999

"A clear and comprehensive popular treatment of the cutting edge of physics."
Physics changes so rapidly that a new survey of its landmarks is necessary every few years; here's an update from a popular British science writer. Read full book review >

WHEN THINGS START TO THINK by Neil Gershenfeld
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Gershenfeld continually advances the cutting edge of the Digital Revolution, while striving to humanize it. (16 b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
This book is the result of Gershenfeld's years of research as director of the Physics and Media Group at MIT's famous Media Lab—it lets us peek at the remarkable new digitized world he foresees. Read full book review >
THE BIRTH OF THE CELL by Henry Harris
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"For, after all, those who look through microscopes often see what they want to. (68 illustrations)"
Not quite an emperor's-new-clothes retelling, but Harris (Regius Professor of Medicine Emeritus, Oxford) aims to set the record straight on who should really get the credit for discoveries and insights into the nature of cells. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"One of the best books yet written on the now information age."
York University (Canada) political scientist Whitaker offers a brilliant portrayal and analysis of the dangers of the "new information technology." Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Heavy going in spots, but an extremely provocative glimpse of what the next few decades may well hold."
What will the world look like when computers are smarter than their owners? Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 12, 1998

"This is an example of science writing at its best: informative, witty, fun, and accessible, without sacrificing the complexities inherent in modem cosmology and particle physics."
Here is a collection of cosmological exotica, from the shrinking sun to the weighing of empty space, written masterfully by Gribbin (co-author, Fire on Earth, 1996, etc.), a noted English cosmologist and award-winning writer of popular science. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"A sharp mind is much in evidence, delighting in exposing fraud, providing instruction, baiting a colleague, and indulging in his own high-wire acts of evolutionary dreaming."
Dawkins takes to heart his title of Charles Simonyi Professor of Public Understanding of Science at Oxford in this thoughtful exegesis on the nature of science and why its detractors are all wrong. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Be that as it may, he makes an excellent case for the importance of evolutionary biology to all of science."
Ironically, Rose (Evolutionary Biology/Univ. of Calif., Irvine) invokes the image of a hovering Darwinian ghost in this altogether rational, absorbing account of the past 150 years of Darwinism. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >