Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 163)

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"High marks for being both instructive and entertaining."
A demanding but rewarding report that illuminates what neurology can now tell us about the human brain. Read full book review >
EINSTEIN LIVED HERE by Abraham Pais
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"Those seeking a broad overview of Einstein's life will be better served elsewhere."
``Why is it that nobody understands me and everybody likes me?'' Albert Einstein reportedly asked the New York Times in 1944. Read full book review >

e: THE STORY OF A NUMBER by Eli Maor
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1994

"Pithy, punchy, and surprisingly accessible."
This book that dares to use ``e'' in its title is not for mathematicians only. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 22, 1994

"Zohar and Marshall offer the general reader a better introduction to contemporary science than to social philosophy while stretching the limit of fashionable interdisciplinary discussion."
In the high-spirited Up my Mother's Flagpole (1974), Zohar characterized her early life as a process of individuation and alienation. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 15, 1994

"Chapters on earthquake prediction, protein folding, DNA duplication, the search for the top quark, and the nature of the sun's deepest interior provide intriguing clues, if not the last roundup, on frontier science."
Capitalizing on an annual forum to showcase young investigators, the prestigious National Academy of Sciences is publishing science-writer versions of ``frontier'' research in 10 fields ranging from particle physics to AIDS. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 4, 1994

"With rich allusions to myth, superstition, religion, anthropology, a challenging and rewarding book, well worth the stretch it requires."
In this challenging, provocative, and original multi- disciplinary study, Mengham (English/Cambridge) goes beyond linguistics, semantics, and philology, to consider language in the evolution of social life, from its mystical role in religion to its historical one in culture and its material one in economics. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1994

"While much remains to be done to match even the more conservative prophecies of AI pioneers such as Minsky, the accomplishments to date, are often fascinating and shed light not only on the future of computers, but on the nature of intelligence itself."
A lively, clear, and comprehensive survey of who's who and what they're up to in the world of Artificial Intelligence (AI to cognoscenti) from science journalist Freedman. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1994

"However, had the authors avoided cutesy neologisms, visits to another planet, and other textural distractions, their many useful examples and well-taken points might have been even better taken."
Riding the wave of popularizations of chaos and complexity theory is this new contender by a pair of English science writers, Cohen, a biologist, and Stewart, a mathematician. Read full book review >
ZIPPER! by Robert Friedel
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1994

"A nicely calculated blend of cultural and business perspectives. (Photos—not seen)"
Last year marked the centenary of the zipper, or at least of the date on which the US Government granted Whitcomb L. Judson two basic patents for this exemplary bit of Yankee ingenuity. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1994

"At the same time, he underscores the difficulties scientists face in attempting to breed endangered species in captivity and reintroduce them to the wild, especially when native habitat is lost."
An environmental reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer tells the mysterious tale of the sudden disappearance of birds on the Pacific island of Guam in his first book. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1994

"A worthy successor to the popular physics texts of George Gamow, as thought-provoking as Stephen Hawking."
Kaku (Physics/CCNY) is the author (with Jennifer Trainer) of Beyond Einstein (1987) and of several popular volumes on advanced physics. He is also the host of a weekly radio program on modern science. Here, he offers a popular explanation of how the mathematics of higher dimensions underlies modern physical theories, notably the superstring hypothesis of how the universe is put together. Read full book review >
CYBERIA by Douglas Rushkoff
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 1, 1994

"A provocative, wide-ranging survey of the current state of the interface between the longings of youth and the wild potentials of computer technology."
Rushkoff, a New York-based journalist, goes west to Berkeley for a look inside Cyberia—the emerging countercultural terrain of computer hackers, ``smart'' drugs, house music, and a range of alternate ``cyberpunk'' lifestyles and anarchic philosophies. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >