Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 163)

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2001

"Fascinating. A delight for anyone interested in bird life and issues of extinction and endangerment."
Informed musings on humanity's relationship with nature and the extinction of animal species. Read full book review >
TRAVELS IN THE GENETICALLY MODIFIED ZONE by Mark L. Winston
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2001

"Balanced anatomy of a classic risks-versus-rewards dilemma."
A scientific perspective on the question of whether continuing to tamper with the DNA of food crops will produce a brave new world or the end of one as we know it. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2001

"Occasionally hobbled by its split focus on two audiences, but worth it for the battle of bugs vs. human immunity alone."
Neurosurgeon Vertosick (Why We Hurt, 2000) makes an ambitious attempt to demonstrate that intelligence, evolution, and life itself are manifestations of the same process. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2001

"Preaches to the converted, but will leave others unconvinced."
Prominent animal-rights activist and lawyer Wise (Rattling the Cage, 2000) makes a case for animal rights based on "practical autonomy." Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"The sun is simply peerless from any angle and this enlightening biography shows it in all its glory—as bright as daylight. (Color and b&w illustrations)"
It may be "the story of one tiny star among the trillions that have come and gone during the past 15 billion years," but it sure makes for soul-stirring, mind-blowing reading. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"Natural history par excellence."
A sweeping natural history of North America from its birth as a self-contained continent in the Cretaceous era to its current precarious status as an ecological superpower. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"Like all good history, this thoroughly researched and documented account offers lessons for today. (Ten line drawings and ten halftones)"
A critical look at the origins of criminal identification and the impact of changing technologies on the field. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"Beavan admirably brings to vivid life the tangled human tale behind a technological breakthrough. (36 line drawings and halftones)"
A lively, fascinating recounting of how fingerprints came to be a means of criminal identification, with emphasis on the personalities, claims, and peccadilloes of the men involved. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"Thoughtfully conceived and expertly written, this is a good companion for travelers to the islands and students of the history of science alike."
An absorbing study of the role of the South American island chain in shaping evolutionary theory. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"The premises here are ultimately neither radical nor obtuse, and readers with a general familiarity with the Web will be prepared to understand these coherent and cogent arguments."
A Web visionary's largely successful attempt to place the new medium within a social and cultural context. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"No more Natural History columns, but the future will no doubt see much more from Gould, a self-described addict of the short form. These essays trail in his wake like mushrooms after a rain. (b&w illustrations)"
Thirty-one sprightly and invaluable essays, in which the play of "little odd tidbits as illustrations of general theories" the author has raised to an art form. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

"Despite the author's penchant for distracting digressions, a terrific, essential addition to the library of popular-science books."
Former Nature editor Buchanan (Ubiquity, 2001) takes an intriguing, accessible look at the mathematics behind the "six degrees of separation" theory. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >