Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 163)

NON-FICTION
Released: April 2, 2003

"Nonetheless, a provocative, conservative invocation of the need for awe, love, spiritual life, and humanity."
Bleakly expanding on arguments made in The End of Nature (1989), McKibben paints a grim canvas of what will happen if nothing is done to arrest the "technotopian" dreams of . . . Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2003

"Gould, who lived and died exemplifying that sort of consilience, clearly has the last word."
The late paleontologist is in full and eloquent posthumous voice as he laments a false dichotomy that has pitted science against the humanities, including religion and ethics, since the 17th century. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2003

"A fascinating glimpse of research that may in a few years find its way into our everyday lives."
Expanding on an article from Wired, SF novelist McCarthy (The Collapsium, 2000, etc.) asserts that the next breakthrough in materials science might be designer elements with properties programmable to whatever the customer requests. Read full book review >
OXYGEN by Nick Lane
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2003

"Provocative and complexly argued."
British biochemist Lane (University College, London) examines questions of life and death as seen through the lens of oxygen. Read full book review >
IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE by Andrew Parker
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2003

"Cutting-edge science, highly recommended."
The Cambrian period saw the first proliferation of complex life on earth, and herewith is the fascinating argument that the development of vision triggered "evolution's big bang." Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2003

"Cleverly entertaining 'stand-up' science in search of a cosmic punch line."
Award-winning science writer Cole (The Hole in the Universe, 2001, etc.) offers a "love letter to the universe and those who explore it" in an essay collection culled from her popular LA Times column. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2003

"A fine piece of scientific sociology."
British author Sabbagh (A Rum Affair, 2000, etc.) looks at a major unsolved problem in pure math and the men working to solve it. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 5, 2003

"A highly accessible survey."
Scientists wield sophisticated new tools as they finally approach some answers to the basic question of how order arises from chaos. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 2, 2003

"A tantalizing glimpse of how the uncertainties of quantum theory may yet be tamed for work of the highest precision."
New York Times science writer Johnson (Strange Beauty, 1999, etc.) explains why quantum computers are expected to be the next major breakthrough. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2003

"A fine demonstration of science made accessible. (4 line drawings)"
The author of Making Babies (2001) takes a lively, witty tour of the X chromosome, creator of "a delicious asymmetry between men and women." Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2003

"A fascinating and well-written account of scientists at work in an often neglected discipline."
New Scientist editor Walker looks at the hottest issue in geology: whether or not the Earth of some 700 million years ago was covered in ice. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 3, 2003

"Fascinating and important material, though it deserves better exposition."
A leading neurologist and critically praised science writer (The Feeling of What Happens, 1999, etc.) argues that research on human emotions supports the 17th-century philosopher's conclusions about the mind-body problem. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >