Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 163)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 4, 1997

"Recommended for all time-pressured type As."
An amusing, informative account of how different cultures and subcultures have different concepts of time. Read full book review >
NASA/TREK by Constance Penley
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Boldly—and successfully—goes where no one has gone before. (20 b&w photos, not seen)"
A clever and iconoclastic dual portrait of the NASA space program and Star Trek fandom from a feminist perspective. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1997

"Still, these are minor lapses in what is otherwise a sturdy and erudite overview of one of the most complex periods of thought."
Everdell (The End of Kings, 1983) presents one of the more accessible studies of early Modernism (up to WW I), relying on a ``big name'' approach to dissect the meanings of one of the most slippery terms in all of cultural criticism. Read full book review >
BIOMIMICRY by Janine M. Benyus
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 1, 1997

"Much of interest here, but spare us the cheerleading."
``Doing it nature's way'' is the theme of this wide-eyed-with-wonder exposition of what's going on in a variety of fields—from farming to computer science—as scientists try to emulate natural processes. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1997

"Muddled intentions, combined with the unconvincing specter of a world full of HALs controlling their makers, diminish Rawlins's latest effort to enlighten us about our future."
An uninspiring review of the history of the computer, and an evaluation of its impact on our society today and in decades to come. Read full book review >

STUFF by Ivan Amato
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 7, 1997

"It is a heady time for this new discipline, and Amato gives a good sense of its energy and potential. (illustrations, not seen)"
Materials science sees the world as fodder for new and better structural materials; here's an overview of this new discipline. Read full book review >
THE WISDOM OF THE BODY by Sherwin B. Nuland
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 5, 1997

"To read this book is to share his awe. (8 drawings, not seen) (First printing of 200,000)"
From the author of the National Book Awardwinning How We Die (1994), another eloquent, thought-provoking dissertation, this time on what we are. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1997

"Kanigel's lively prose and sense of irony make this biography an enjoyable read. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A circumspect biography of America's first efficiency expert, sensitive to both Taylor's limitations and his impact on the world. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"A good survey not only of infinity, but of the scientific revolutions that have grown out of our attempts to grapple with the concept."
The idea of the infinite has baffled thinkers since ancient times; now a top science writer tries to shed light on the concept. Read full book review >
T. REX AND THE CRATER OF DOOM by Walter Alvarez
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

An explanation of the end of the dinosaurs, by the Berkeley geologist who helped promulgate the theory. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"There is much joy and beauty in this passage from speculation to demonstration, and we have Ferris to thank for his superb rendering, both of the shebang and of the science that studies the shebang. (Book-of-the-Month Club split main selection; History Book Club alternate selection)"
As Virgil led Dante through the thickets and circles of the inferno, so Ferris, a science writer's science writer, guides the reader through the clouds and bubbles, the singularities and uncertainties that characterize cosmology today. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"Authoritative and valuable historically, though because of Pais's remoteness, not widely appealing as an autobiography. (24 b&w photos)"
The author of a highly regarded biography of Albert Einstein (Subtle Is the Lord, not reviewed; Einstein Lived Here, 1994) sums up his own life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 5, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >