Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 163)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 25, 1993

"An impressive compendium of data and theories of human evolution, along with the author's own speculations—sure to trigger controversy in a field known for contention."
Remember the ``mitochondrial Eve'' (popularly interpreted to mean that we're all descended from an African mom upward of 200,000 years ago)? Read full book review >
IN THE BEGINNING by John Gribbin
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 2, 1993

"As usual, Gribbin does a snappy reprise of the relevant theories and history before the whoosh and wow take over."
Not only is there another universe next door, but myriad others across the eons of time and space: That's one conclusion voiced here by this former Stephen Hawking student and popularizer of astronomy (Unveiling the Edge of Time, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 28, 1993

"As energetic as Sagan, without the pontificating; once McSween finds a richer theme, the moon's the limit."
Comet dirt, magma oceans, meteorites from Mars—all the extraterrestrial grit and goop that geologists love—brought wittily down to earth. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 28, 1993

"A suspenseful confrontation between a roaring inferno and an elephantine bureaucracy, in which everyone gets burned."
With one eye cocked for high drama, the other for any hint of bureaucratic bungling, Morrison (a reporter for Insight magazine) tells in fascinating detail the story of Yellowstone's 1988 firestorm. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: July 14, 1993

"Meanwhile, a perverse thought keeps stirring: Isn't this solipsism turned inside out?"
In another speculative volume, Darling (Deep Time, 1989) foresees a grand and glorious future as he ponders the nature and destiny of humanity. Read full book review >

THE EVENING STAR by Jr. Cooper
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 1, 1993

"Who would have thought that the planet of love could be so downright blah?"
Cooper, staff writer at The New Yorker and one of the more adroit science writers around (Imaging Saturn, 1983; The Search for Life on Mars, 1980, etc.), crashes and burns in this dull discussion of the Magellan spacecraft and its mission to map Venus. Read full book review >
THE END OF PHYSICS by David Lindley
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 16, 1993

"The rub may lie in the eerie phenomenon by which the toys of mathematicians so often do turn out to be the tools that physicists use to construct—and demonstrate—the next paradigm. (Illustrations)"
When Lindley says ``myth,'' he means it not as a metaphor but literally: ``a story that makes sense within its own terms...but can be neither tested nor disproved.'' Such is the sorry pass he believes that particle physics has come to at the end of the 20th century. Read full book review >
FUZZY THINKING by Bart Kosko
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 15, 1993

"Still, for all the self-indulgence, probably the best primer around for learning what FL is all about, certainly cuts above Daniel McNeill and Paul Freiberger's Fuzzy Logic (p. 45)."
Aristotle is out and Buddha is in; the law of the excluded middle (either A or not-A) is repealed, and A and not-A together replaces it. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 10, 1993

"A convincing vision quest that may, however, lose readers in its mazelike abundance of references and quotes. (Thirty-three line drawings—not seen)"
These ponderings on the meaning of life find theoretical concepts and notional fancies so thick on the ground that readers may wish to approach the book armed with a machete. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 10, 1993

"An informative and well-integrated polemic."
It's no news that many Americans live in a spread-out, privatized suburban wasteland without community or centers; that much landscape has given way to ugly sprawl; that this condition may be due to systematic policies on the part of government and industrial forces; and that the automobile is the engine that has driven us there. Read full book review >
ENTROPY AND THE MAGIC FLUTE by Harold J. Morowitz
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1993

"Very clever, Professor Morowitz."
More short essays (49, no less) in this latest collection (Mayonnaise and the Origin of Life, 1985, etc.) culled from Morowitz's regular contributions to Hospital Practice. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1993

"The best Bio 101 you're likely to find. (Twenty-four line illustrations)"
Charming, fascinating, and insightful, this slim volume combines a memoir of a life in science with an accessible distillation of what we know about the workings of living things. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >