Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 163)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 21, 1997

"A good overview of one of the great intellectual puzzles of modern history. (photos and line drawings)"
The proof of Fermat's Last Theorem has been called the mathematical event of the century; this popular account puts the discovery in perspective for non-mathematicians. Read full book review >
GROWING UP DIGITAL by Don Tapscott
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 21, 1997

"Too vaporous and unreflectingly enthusiastic to be of much use to anyone deeply interested in the questions of new tehcnology and American society. (illustrations, graphs, not seen) (First printing of 100,000; $100,000 ad/promo; TV satellite tour)"
Add this to the swelling pile of books on new media that pose many questions and leave all but a few unanswered. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 15, 1997

"Despite that shortcoming and an occasional loss of focus, Glass makes a compelling case, a bit more understated than Goldhagen's and more effective as a result."
Glass, an expert in the interplay of politics and the psychology of illusion, takes on the darkest example of that phenomenon, the Holocaust. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 14, 1997

"As it stands, The Soft Edge is too soft, and without taste."
The ``soft edge'' of the title refers to the intangibles surrounding technology's impact on society. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Readers will be moved by Gould's personal account of the process and the person involved. (16 b&w illustrations, not seen) (Author tour)"
``What?,'' ``When?,'' and ``Why?'' are the titles Gould gives to the three short essays probing humankind's fascination with thousand-year intervals. Read full book review >

FIRST CUT by III Carter
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Although its author seems to have had a grander purpose in mind, the book's real value is in its clear depiction of what medical students must do to learn human anatomy."
Musings and observations of a literature professor with a penchant for things medical as he follows a group of first-year med students taking human anatomy, a course that includes dissecting cadavers. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"This hit-and-miss social commentary, combined with a penchant for inflated academic language (allayed only slightly by period cartoons), sabotages Ritvo's goal of illuminating the cultural ramifications of Enlightenment zoology. (illustrations)"
This wide-ranging study of the ``heroic age of scientific classification'' attempts—with only partial success—to place the taxonomic advances and prejudices of 18th- and 19th-century England in a broader cultural context. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The well and the sick alike will find much to ponder here— this is the kind of book whose thoughts and messages linger long after it has been closed. (First serial to the New Yorker; author tour)"
An astonishingly well written book that illuminates life's meaning without a trace of maudlin sentimentality. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"With this fascinating volume, Kaku positions himself as a worthy successor to the late Carl Sagan as a spokesman for the potential of science to revolutionize our lives. (Author tour)"
Here's another entry in the game of predicting what science and technology will come up with after the turn of the millennium, this one from a theoretical physicist. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Accessible and provocative, but surely not the last word. (Author tour)"
From the author of The Evolution of Consciousness (1991) and other popular works on the human mind, a revealing account of his own and others' prior misunderstandings about the right and left brains, a concise summary of current knowledge, and some provocative speculations about the development and functioning of the two hemispheres. Read full book review >
BRIGHT PARADISE by Peter Raby
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Importantly, Raby shows how the works of the explorers shaped a new Darwinian and colonialist worldview, one that remains mighty influential in the modern imagination. (8 pages illustrations and maps)"
A lucid and lively survey of Victorian explorers from Raby (English/Homerton College, Cambridge). ``For the English in the nineteenth century, abroad, and especially the Empire and the colonies, existed to bring things back from,'' notes Raby in a neat introductory capsulization. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"A vibrant natural (and human) history of a biomassive throughway where large patches still remain unknown. (2 maps, not seen)"
The unique evolutionary story of the species-rich Central American land bridge is eloquently chronicled by Wallace (The Quetzal and the Macaw, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

From Morgan Matson, the bestselling author of Since You’ve Been Gone, comes The Unexpected Everything, a feel-good YA novel of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >