Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 164)

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 7, 1999

"Welsome's stunning book adds much to that literature, and it makes for sobering reading."
A fierce exposÇ of governmental duplicity and dangerous science. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 7, 1999

"An engrossing, challenging work that more than answers the question its title raises. (For two other studies of earliest childhood development, see John Bruer, The Myth of the First Three Years, p. 1010, and Alison Gopnik, et al., The Scientist in the Crib, p. 1016.)"
This guided tour of "the wrinkly universe inside each child's head" will fascinate most readers, but some may find themselves lost amid its complexity. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"A workmanlike job, covering the main events and key players of one of the great stories in modern science. (67 photos, 9 ilustrations)"
Every schoolchild now knows that the dinosaurs were killed off by a meteor, but it took a while for scientists to accept the idea. Read full book review >
THE ARITHMETIC OF LIFE by George Shaffner
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Shines light into several interesting corners of everyday life, often with surprising results—and the numbers don't lie."
"Life can make sense," is the motto of this forthright little book, and all it takes is a little math. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"For the rest, the book succeeds in capturing the flavor of fuzziness but not enough to convince us it's time to throw the binary baby out with the bathwater. (Author tour)"
Flights of fuzzy fancy, and fantasy, from an expert in the field (Fuzzy Thinking, 1993)—but hardly a guide for the perplexed. Read full book review >

ENTERING SPACE by Robert Zubrin
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"An irrepressibly optimistic view—more persuasive than one might expect—of the future of space travel and colonization, both within the solar system and beyond."
The author believes it is humanity's destiny to inhabit other planets in our solar system and beyond. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Thought-provoking, and an overall useful exercise."
Are the sciences that might explain the human mind—neuroscience, psychology, psychiatry'still in their infancy? Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"If you're going to own just one general science book, you'd do well to make it this one."
Gribbin, assisted by his occasional co-author Mary, tops himself with this one-volume summary of the current state of scientific knowledge. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 27, 1999

"A series of meandering discussions of great scientists that is two parts Charlie Rose to one part Bill Maher. (12 photos, not seen)"
A mixed bag of essays on 12 great scientists, derived from a series of radio shows hosted by the author. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 25, 1999

"Essential Clarke; highly recommended."
A science fiction giant (3001: The Final Odyssey, 1997, and many others), Clarke has always been equally at home in nonfiction. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 23, 1999

"Covers the gamut of current scientific research on the possibility of life elsewhere in our solar system and beyond. (17 illustrations)"
A sweeping look at the many possible places we can search for signs of extraterrestrial life, from distant galaxies to our own back door. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 23, 1999

"I believe the world is a better place.' (Author tour)"
The founder of a major Internet-based enterprise offers a chronology and insider's narrative of Netscape, from its inception through a wildly successful public stock offering. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >