Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 164)

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1999

"Though they try hard for journalistic objectivity, it's clear where the authors' sympathies lie as they chart different courses that can reduce the human contribution to extinction."
Intelligently affecting stories of animals reduced to rarity, what leads to their predicament, and the people and ideas working to ward off extinction. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1999

"In the meantime readers can relish eyewitness accounts of academic fur flying and the nonclaustrophobic can experience the vicarious thrills of cavers for whom getting there is a lot of the fun."
In an account that is half cave adventure, half science venture, intrepid journalist Taylor tells what it's like to collect bacteria samples in the deep and dark and what happens later when experts battle over what the depths reveal. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1999

"Instead, Crease provides a well written, more narrowly focused account of the research and community of Brookhaven suitable for those interested in studying the heyday of big physics. (77 b&w photos, 5 maps, 12 illustrations, not seen)"
A detailed, technical account of the first 25 years of Brookhaven National Laboratory, describing not only the evolution of several groundbreaking projects, but also the personalities and politics that helped shape this community of scientists. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1999

"But expect some of his methods to be questioned and some of his subjects begging to differ. (12 photos, 18 line illustrations)"
Ruse (Philosophy and Zoology/Univ. of Guelf, Canada) poses a trendy question: Is evolution (indeed, is all science) a social construct, i.e., relative, subjective? Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 1, 1999

"A scientist's careful, unsensational account of the current status of research into aging that requires from the reader a level of commitment well beyond mere curiosity."
A virtual textbook on what the growing knowledge of biochemistry, genetics, and molecular biology is revealing about the basic mechanisms of aging. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1999

"A useful addition to the growing landscape-in-history literature."
A well-conceived if sometimes plodding essay in the role of the landscape in American history. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1999

"Highly recommended."
In the late 1960s, Xerox founded a research center at Palo Alto, Calif. In time, that facility, known as PARC, became ground zero of the computer revolution, as recounted here. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 26, 1999

"But it would be nice to also have a series of lectures that accentuates the positive. (26 photos and drawings)"
This book compiles public lectures by eight neuroscientists in a series sponsored by the Smithsonian Associates and the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, and edited by a former managing editor for Time-Life Books. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 1999

A hokey autobiography of American astronaut and moon-walker Cernan. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1999

"An eminently readable account of life on the cutting edge of cyberspace."
Of all the "sci-fi-come-true" ideas to emerge from computer research, one of the most intriguing is virtual reality (VR). Read full book review >
VISIONS OF TECHNOLOGY by Richard Rhodes
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1999

"Pity, because with a little more effort and more than cursory commentary he could have created pathways leading to a forest of ideas."
An anthology of short takes on the century's progress in invention/technology, selected and presented chronologically by a prize-winning writer who himself has contributed to the history of technology (e.g., Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, 1995). Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1999

"His new work offers testimony to Davies's passionate curiosity and to masterful writing, which reads like science fiction. (Book-of-the-Month Club dual main selection/Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selection)"
Davies is an astrophysicist who often writes about the famous question posed in the title of Erwin Schrîdinger's What Is Life? (1944). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 14, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >