Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 166)

THE EVENING STAR by Jr. Cooper
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 1, 1993

"Who would have thought that the planet of love could be so downright blah?"
Cooper, staff writer at The New Yorker and one of the more adroit science writers around (Imaging Saturn, 1983; The Search for Life on Mars, 1980, etc.), crashes and burns in this dull discussion of the Magellan spacecraft and its mission to map Venus. Read full book review >
THE END OF PHYSICS by David Lindley
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 16, 1993

"The rub may lie in the eerie phenomenon by which the toys of mathematicians so often do turn out to be the tools that physicists use to construct—and demonstrate—the next paradigm. (Illustrations)"
When Lindley says ``myth,'' he means it not as a metaphor but literally: ``a story that makes sense within its own terms...but can be neither tested nor disproved.'' Such is the sorry pass he believes that particle physics has come to at the end of the 20th century. Read full book review >

FUZZY THINKING by Bart Kosko
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 15, 1993

"Still, for all the self-indulgence, probably the best primer around for learning what FL is all about, certainly cuts above Daniel McNeill and Paul Freiberger's Fuzzy Logic (p. 45)."
Aristotle is out and Buddha is in; the law of the excluded middle (either A or not-A) is repealed, and A and not-A together replaces it. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 10, 1993

"A convincing vision quest that may, however, lose readers in its mazelike abundance of references and quotes. (Thirty-three line drawings—not seen)"
These ponderings on the meaning of life find theoretical concepts and notional fancies so thick on the ground that readers may wish to approach the book armed with a machete. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 10, 1993

"An informative and well-integrated polemic."
It's no news that many Americans live in a spread-out, privatized suburban wasteland without community or centers; that much landscape has given way to ugly sprawl; that this condition may be due to systematic policies on the part of government and industrial forces; and that the automobile is the engine that has driven us there. Read full book review >

ENTROPY AND THE MAGIC FLUTE by Harold J. Morowitz
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1993

"Very clever, Professor Morowitz."
More short essays (49, no less) in this latest collection (Mayonnaise and the Origin of Life, 1985, etc.) culled from Morowitz's regular contributions to Hospital Practice. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1993

"The best Bio 101 you're likely to find. (Twenty-four line illustrations)"
Charming, fascinating, and insightful, this slim volume combines a memoir of a life in science with an accessible distillation of what we know about the workings of living things. Read full book review >
THE FERMI SOLUTION by Hans Christian von Baeyer
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1993

"Overall, von Baeyer does extremely well by words alone, but a few illustrations would have underscored the trickier points."
Further essays from William and Mary physicist von Baeyer, who pleased with Taming the Atom (1992) and Rainbows, Snowflakes, and Quarks (1984). Read full book review >
THE SEXUAL BRAIN by Simon LeVay
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: June 1, 1993

"Erudite and entertaining."
A fascinating look at the biological bases for diversity of sexual feelings and behavior. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 31, 1993

"Brain candy, then, and none too convincing."
A brief for a new discipline known as ``evolutionary psychology''—as well as a pessimistic assessment of the human condition, based on the alleged biological sources of social customs in lemurs and other primates. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1993

"Kimbrell sends a meaningful message—but at the price of dismissing any good to come from genetics research in favor of pietistic nay-saying."
Given the title here, as well as the foreword by Jeremy Rifkin (biotechnology's most ardent antagonist), readers are well advised concerning the content of this polemic by the policy director of Rifkin's Foundation on Economic Trends. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >