Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 166)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"An odd blend of fantasy and foreboding."
Reads like science fiction that is alternately dream and nightmare. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 19, 1998

"For the general reader, Marcuse's early essays provide one entree to that world; for the specialist, they provide backdrop to Marcuse's more famous published books. (9 photos, not seen)"
Part 1940s period piece, part stimulus to ongoing thought on the social impact of technology, this first in a projected six volumes of Marcuse's papers, many of them previously unpublished, merits the attention of critical theorists and general readers alike. Read full book review >

FIELD NOTES FROM THE NORTHERN FOREST by Curt Stager
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 15, 1998

"Stager's upbeat short takes are like a day afield with an avuncular guide, paying tribute to his neck of the woods while inspiring the rest of us that getting in touch with nature can be as simple as looking around our own backyards. (illustrations, not seen)"
Short, personable essays enthusiastically explore the natural history of one of North America's largest (and possibly most overlooked) ecosystems. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 14, 1998

"The point is well made by Wilson in this ranging, anecdote-strewn, and engaging study. (b&w illustrations)"
An extended synthesizing meditation on the human hand from Wilson (Tone Deaf and All Thumbs?, 1986). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: July 8, 1998

"And yet he makes a thorough and fascinating case, one that will no doubt anger those holding to the orthodoxies laid down by Darwin. (50 b&w illustrations, 15 b&w photos, not seen)"
The author of Evolution: A Theory in Crisis (not reviewed) again confronts the notion that the presence of humankind is a random event in a random universe, asserting that "the cosmos is uniquely fit for the specific type of life that exists on Earth." Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 8, 1998

"A fascinating cross-section of history. (Author tour)"
Time flows inevitably, but the calendar is a human institution—and its history is a colorful mix of science, whim, and pure chance. Read full book review >
MANAGING MARTIANS by Donna Shirley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 4, 1998

"Never say die! (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) ($65,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
To paraphrase the old soap opera: Can a rich girl from a small Oklahoma town find success and happiness married to her job as first woman manager of a NASA space program? Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 1, 1998

"A sobering look at the power of early influences to affect the development of a healthy mind—and ultimately a healthy society."
An expert in early brain development offers a timely reminder of the importance of human relationships in shaping the minds of the very young. Read full book review >
BORN THAT WAY by William Wright
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 16, 1998

"The book leaves one wishing to hear less from polemicists rooting for or against genes and more from scientists striving to find out exactly what genes do. (Author tour)"
An enthusiastic, informative account of the young field of behavioral genetics that could use less of the reporter and more of the subject. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 15, 1998

"More of a —greatest hits— of madmen than a measured look at madness and genius."
A haphazardly assembled collection of profiles of inventors, philosophers, writers, artists, and just plain brilliant madmen. Read full book review >
A GENTLE PLEA FOR CHAOS by Mirabel Osler
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1998

"Osler's thinking is original, intuitive, and sharp as a tack; as a gardening writer she rightly sits up there with Henry Mitchell and Eleanor Perenyi."
Osler's plea is not so gentle; rather, it's opinionated (though never dismissive), bell-clear, wickedly humorous, brilliant—a call for cultivated anarchy in the garden that turns an oxymoron into a sensuous, sensible act. Read full book review >
LIFE SIGNS by Robert Jenkins
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1998

"Entertaining and informative, worth reading even by non-Trekkies. (For another look at Star Trek, see Jeff Greenwald, Future Perfect, p. 712.)"
Here's another—probably not the last—in the recent batch of books explaining modern science by referring to popular sci-fi shows. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >