Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 166)

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Deloria should have stuck to his fundamentalist guns; his attempt to fight science with science is a dismal failure."
The first of a proposed trilogy attacking Western science, religion, and government. Read full book review >
DOMINION by Niles Eldredge
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Makes sense, but is anyone outside the members of the choir listening?"
The latest on human evolution from our man at New York City's American Museum of Natural History (Dept. of Invertebrates), who views the future with alarm. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Overall, Restak has managed a remarkable sweep of information in a short book: proving that if you lay down your anatomical landmarks in advance, you can lead the reader to some very exciting and promising brain(land)scapes. (15 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
An orthodox approach that works. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Overall, their enthusiasm marks the authors as true believers that the efforts of mankind (yes, mostly men) to take on complexity, achieving both beauty and order, will succeed. (8-page color insert, not seen)"
From the English team that brought you The Arrow of Time (1991), more on the general theme that the most interesting things in life are nonlinear, asymmetric, chaotic, and complexin short, not user-friendly, but perhaps computable. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"As such, one can pick and choose among the arguments Shreeve fully and fairly presentsor come up with a view of one's own."
``Enigma Variations'' might be a better title to this compendium of conjectures on the where, when, and why of human origins. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"Great for high schoolers, the math-anxious but curious, and others who want to knowbut not too much."
Well, of course E = mc2; that's the last in chronological order of the five favorites that Guillen extols in this lively exposition of science for the layman. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 12, 1995

"Maybe this book will spur someone to settle these questions once and for all."
Change the world? Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"On sabbatical in cyberspace: a prof gets wired and finds a community that is strikingly similar to the society that thrived before the advent of the modem."
For those who have had enough of the Information Superhighway metaphor, Moore (English/Penn State Univ.) introduces a new conceit: the electronic lace doily. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Fine bedside reading for students of cities and futurists everywhere. (illustrations) (Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selections; author tour)"
The learned Rybczynski strikes again, this time with an engrossing social history of town planning in America. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"He eventually became a full-time transvestite and opened a museum devoted to the GrÅnderzeit, where he continues to work today."
Charlotte von Mahlsdorf was born Lothar Berfelde in 1928, in the village of Mahlsdorf near Berlin. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A journey along the edge of human comprehension: accessible and even elegant, but a bit overstuffed."
A New York Times science writer contemplates the human compulsion to search for order and purpose in the origin of the universe and the development of life on earth. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 23, 1995

"The information superhighway intersects with the Greek ideal of true democracy, and if Grossman is correct, American politics never will be the same."
The former Public Broadcasting Service CEO and NBC News president lets loose with a fusillade of bold predictions on how rapidly advancing communications technology will radically change the public's role in the national political process. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >