Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 166)

NON-FICTION
Released: June 10, 2003

"A shameful episode exposed with thoroughness and a graceful pen. Highly recommended for students of the space race and women's issues alike."
Dogs and monkeys did it. So did American men, though some were, strictly speaking, unqualified. So did Russian women, early on. Why, then, did NASA balk at putting an All-American Girl in space? Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2003

"Certainly not the last word, but a lot of interesting turns of phrase and provocative findings to enrich the all-absorbing study of genes and behavior."
More on the ongoing debate of whether heredity or environment is in charge of who we are, from the assertive but knowledgeable English science writer Ridley. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2003

"Well written and richly detailed."
A key period in Charles Darwin's career: the years 1846-54, when he became the world's expert on barnacles. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2003

"Learned and readable, but not everyone will be convinced."
Hedge-fund manager Alcaly views with a sanguine eye the state of the American economy. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2003

"A pleasure for students of technological history—and for readers with a fondness for bizarre personality types."
Q: Why did Ben Franklin fly a kite? A: Because he was ticked off at the scientific establishment. Read full book review >

Y by Steve Jones
NON-FICTION
Released: May 15, 2003

"Informative but off-putting unless you agree that 'ascent of women' implies 'descent of men.'"
Maleness as survival strategy seems increasingly unwise in this elaboration on the Y chromosome. Read full book review >
A SHORT HISTORY OF NEARLY EVERYTHING by Bill Bryson
NON-FICTION
Released: May 6, 2003

"Loads of good explaining, with reminders, time and again, of how much remains unknown, neatly putting the death of science into perspective."
Bryson (I'm a Stranger Here Myself, 1999, etc.), a man who knows how to track down an explanation and make it confess, asks the hard questions of science—e.g., how did things get to be the way they are?—and, when possible, provides answers. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2003

"An informal, often entertaining excursion in the history of science."
An iconoclastic, decidedly revisionist look at the hit-or-miss business of science. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2003

"Thoughtful, often surprising, smoothly written."
Two scientists entertainingly explore the intersections between chemistry and history, such as the French army uniform buttons made of tin, which crumbles to dust in low temperatures, that some scholars blame for the failure of Napoleon's Russian campaign. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2003

"A must for math buffs."
A Royal Society research fellow takes the Riemann Hypothesis, reputedly the most difficult of all math problems, as the focus for his lively history of number theory. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 16, 2003

"Deeply satisfying account of a rotten crime solved by chemical sleuthing."
The expertly told story of a murder and a molecule. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 14, 2003

"A meticulous account of the grinding, day-to-day advances and setbacks, but also infected with the sheer wonder of taking wing. (Photos)"
Kitty Hawk was just the beginning for the Wright brothers, explains NBCC Award-winner Tobin (Ernie Pyle's War, 1997) in his history of their first flight and ensuing efforts to make flying practical and profitable. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >