Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 166)

OF FLIES, MICE, AND MEN by François Jacob
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 15, 1999

"If the likes of Jacob remain, there's hope."
A writer of style and substance narrates the transforming events of recent biology in seven inspired essays, neatly translated by Weiss. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 5, 1999

"A clear and comprehensive popular treatment of the cutting edge of physics."
Physics changes so rapidly that a new survey of its landmarks is necessary every few years; here's an update from a popular British science writer. Read full book review >

WHEN THINGS START TO THINK by Neil Gershenfeld
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Gershenfeld continually advances the cutting edge of the Digital Revolution, while striving to humanize it. (16 b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
This book is the result of Gershenfeld's years of research as director of the Physics and Media Group at MIT's famous Media Lab—it lets us peek at the remarkable new digitized world he foresees. Read full book review >
THE BIRTH OF THE CELL by Henry Harris
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"For, after all, those who look through microscopes often see what they want to. (68 illustrations)"
Not quite an emperor's-new-clothes retelling, but Harris (Regius Professor of Medicine Emeritus, Oxford) aims to set the record straight on who should really get the credit for discoveries and insights into the nature of cells. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"One of the best books yet written on the now information age."
York University (Canada) political scientist Whitaker offers a brilliant portrayal and analysis of the dangers of the "new information technology." Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Heavy going in spots, but an extremely provocative glimpse of what the next few decades may well hold."
What will the world look like when computers are smarter than their owners? Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 12, 1998

"This is an example of science writing at its best: informative, witty, fun, and accessible, without sacrificing the complexities inherent in modem cosmology and particle physics."
Here is a collection of cosmological exotica, from the shrinking sun to the weighing of empty space, written masterfully by Gribbin (co-author, Fire on Earth, 1996, etc.), a noted English cosmologist and award-winning writer of popular science. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"A sharp mind is much in evidence, delighting in exposing fraud, providing instruction, baiting a colleague, and indulging in his own high-wire acts of evolutionary dreaming."
Dawkins takes to heart his title of Charles Simonyi Professor of Public Understanding of Science at Oxford in this thoughtful exegesis on the nature of science and why its detractors are all wrong. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Be that as it may, he makes an excellent case for the importance of evolutionary biology to all of science."
Ironically, Rose (Evolutionary Biology/Univ. of Calif., Irvine) invokes the image of a hovering Darwinian ghost in this altogether rational, absorbing account of the past 150 years of Darwinism. Read full book review >
MAPPING TIME by E.G. Richards
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Clearly written and filled with detail, this will be a strong contender in the calendar-book sweepstakes. (76 illustrations)"
The approach of the millennium has generated a spate of books on the history of our calendar. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Like the undergraduate who discovers a new idea and so concludes that all other ideas must be wrong, she merely states over and over again how right she is without doing the hard intellectual work of engaging those who would challenge her."
A provocative and pretentious defense of the free society, the free market, and even the free person. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 9, 1998

"While some of the issues here will seem esoteric to most American readers, this is a valuable and well-argued document in one of the key philosophical debates of our time."
This latest volley in the ugly squabble between scientists and literary intellectuals was a sensation in France. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >