Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 166)

HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1999

"He provides telling anecdotes that reveal the humor, quirks, frustration, anger, and rewards of being a scientist. (Book-of-the-Month Club dual main selection)"
It's a biography of a scientist, a summary of 20th-century genetics, and a fly's-eye (i.e., multifaceted) view of trends and controversies in biology—all told by an expert science writer with one Pulitizer Prize already to his credit (The Beak of the Finch, 1994). Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 30, 1999

"Once again, this talented author compellingly links a scientific discipline to the philosophical questions it raises about truth, reality, aesthetics, and metaphysics."
Los Angeles Times science writer Cole has found a niche writing in lyrical prose about basic concepts in physics and math for the layperson (The Universe and the Teacup, 1998). Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1999

"Adding to the book's value, however, are Dyson's authoritative commentaries on how past technologies have changed society and, as always, his exemplary prose style."
Just in time for the millennium, elder statesman Dyson (Physics/Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; From Eros to Gaia, 1992, etc.) sounds off on three technological revolutions that could radically transform human social arrangements—if we play our cards right. Read full book review >
THE MEME MACHINE by Susan Blackmore
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1999

"So, enjoy the imaginative leaps and some pithy summaries of current theories and controversies regarding human evolution, but don't substitute the meme bathwater for the gene baby just yet."
Richard Dawkins gave us "memes," the cultural analogue of genes; Blackmore gives us memes in spades—humans as meme machines. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1999

"Though they try hard for journalistic objectivity, it's clear where the authors' sympathies lie as they chart different courses that can reduce the human contribution to extinction."
Intelligently affecting stories of animals reduced to rarity, what leads to their predicament, and the people and ideas working to ward off extinction. Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1999

"In the meantime readers can relish eyewitness accounts of academic fur flying and the nonclaustrophobic can experience the vicarious thrills of cavers for whom getting there is a lot of the fun."
In an account that is half cave adventure, half science venture, intrepid journalist Taylor tells what it's like to collect bacteria samples in the deep and dark and what happens later when experts battle over what the depths reveal. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1999

"Instead, Crease provides a well written, more narrowly focused account of the research and community of Brookhaven suitable for those interested in studying the heyday of big physics. (77 b&w photos, 5 maps, 12 illustrations, not seen)"
A detailed, technical account of the first 25 years of Brookhaven National Laboratory, describing not only the evolution of several groundbreaking projects, but also the personalities and politics that helped shape this community of scientists. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1999

"But expect some of his methods to be questioned and some of his subjects begging to differ. (12 photos, 18 line illustrations)"
Ruse (Philosophy and Zoology/Univ. of Guelf, Canada) poses a trendy question: Is evolution (indeed, is all science) a social construct, i.e., relative, subjective? Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 1, 1999

"A scientist's careful, unsensational account of the current status of research into aging that requires from the reader a level of commitment well beyond mere curiosity."
A virtual textbook on what the growing knowledge of biochemistry, genetics, and molecular biology is revealing about the basic mechanisms of aging. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1999

"A useful addition to the growing landscape-in-history literature."
A well-conceived if sometimes plodding essay in the role of the landscape in American history. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1999

"Highly recommended."
In the late 1960s, Xerox founded a research center at Palo Alto, Calif. In time, that facility, known as PARC, became ground zero of the computer revolution, as recounted here. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: March 26, 1999

"But it would be nice to also have a series of lectures that accentuates the positive. (26 photos and drawings)"
This book compiles public lectures by eight neuroscientists in a series sponsored by the Smithsonian Associates and the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, and edited by a former managing editor for Time-Life Books. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >