Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 166)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 21, 1994

"An enormous amount of well-documented research that overwhelms in its detail yet fails to provide a clear and concise picture of either the science or the politics; still, it's certain to be a valuable resource for future analysts writing from a greater perspective."
An insider's detailed look at the politics of Big Science, in this case the multibillion-dollar project to map all the genes in human DNA. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 15, 1994

"Forthright, wise, and sobering advice as only someone who knows and loves his field—and wants to see the species and the planet survive. (Maps, photographs—not seen)"
This is a difficult but very important book by one of the great figures in genetic research. Read full book review >

RECEPTORS by Richard M. Restak
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 15, 1994

The bland title to psychiatrist/neurologist Restak's latest (The Brain Has a Mind of Its Own, 1991, etc.) refers to the fascinating subject of drugs and the brain. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Creditably, Thompson elaborates on the problems and politics while also neatly outlining the genealogies of science: who studied in whose lab forging the networks (and rivalries) that are par for the course in science."
Seasoned science writer Thompson (The Washington Post, Medical News Network) charts the course of the first successful human experiment in gene therapy, begun in 1990. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1994

"The 175 visuals should be splendid. (Color halftones, illustrations, and maps throughout—not seen)"
Forget bipedalism. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 24, 1994

"Designed for a popular audience, this is in fact a hefty read full of wonder and wisdom."
Another in a series of books (Joel Davis's Mother Tongue, p. 1303; Ray Jackendorf's Patterns in the Mind, p. 1439) popularizing Chomsky's once controversial theories explaining the biological basis of language. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 16, 1994

"A mine of information, suitable for the intelligent nonspecialist. (Seventy b&w illustrations) (Book-of-the-Month Selection for January)"
In their latest medieval study, the Gieses (Life in a Medieval Village, 1990, etc.) explode the myth that the Middle Ages were unconcerned with the empirical and demonstrate that the Renaissance itself was the outcome of gradual progress made over the previous thousand years. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Ridley contends—not a popular thesis in recent decades—that such genetic programming is far more central to human nature than social conditioning. Extensively researched, clearly written: one of the best introductions to its fascinating and controversial subject."
A former editor of The Economist asks how sexual selection has molded human nature. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Entertaining mix of fact and fancy, along with solid information about genetic disorders."
Intriguing speculations about the possible effects on world events of the genetic abnormalities of certain well-known figures. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 19, 1994

An incisive study of ancient religion and the rise of belief in an impending apocalypse, by the author of the classic study The Pursuit of the Millennium. Read full book review >
SIGNS OF LIFE by Robert Pollack
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 19, 1994

"Cautionary and sober words that can well and truly inform current social, political, and scientific debates."
Pollack (former dean of Columbia College and colleague of James D. Watson) takes the popular metaphor of DNA as language—and really runs with it. Read full book review >
A SCIENTIST IN THE CITY by James Trefil
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 18, 1994

"Laypeople's science from one of the best in the business."
Popular science author Trefil (Reading the Mind of God, 1989, etc.) turns to those technology-driven forces—more important, in his view, than social, political, and economic ones—that affect how cities grow and die. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jude Deveraux
author of EVER AFTER
July 1, 2015

New York Times bestselling author Jude Deveraux's eagerly awaited Ever After, the third novel in her blockbuster Nantucket Brides trilogy, continues the saga of the Montgomery-Taggerts, set on an island steeped in beauty and unforgettable romance. Life is anything but perfect for Hallie Hartley, a young physical therapist who has given up nearly everything—even her love life—for her beautiful blonde stepsister, Shelly. Though Shelly's acting career has never taken off, she has certainly perfected the crocodile tears to get what she wants—which all too often means Hallie's boyfriends. When Hallie arrives home early from work one fateful day, she makes two startling discoveries that will turn her life upside down. "This sexy, lighthearted romp brings the series to a satisfying close," our reviewer writes. View video >