Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 167)

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"A magical mystery tour made comprehensible and exhilarating by McCrone's erudition and impressive expository gifts. (8 pages color photographs)"
A science-writer reviews the theories and research that have produced the current view of the brain as a dynamic structure with only superficial resemblances to a digital computer. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"Even so, Stille is an exemplary reporter, and he offers here just the thing to add to a history buff's stack of bedside reading."
On deteriorating masterpieces, disintegrating temples, declining Latin, and other markers of the race to save history from humanity. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2001

"Many won't buy the human dignity thesis or dystopian nightmares, but credit the author for laying out how we got to this pass and why we need to act."
To clone or not to clone? asks social philosopher Fukuyama (The Great Disruption, 1999, etc.) in his latest disquisition on science and society. Read full book review >
THE EXACT LOCATION OF THE SOUL by Richard Selzer
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 1, 2001

"Nonetheless, a passionate, unsentimental celebration of life's messiness, whether on an operating table or at a dining table."
In this eloquent collection of essays, five new, the rest previously published, writer/surgeon Selzer (Raising the Dead, 1994) explores spirit and substance, flesh and feeling, pain and epiphany. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"Sometimes clumsily written, but an interesting look at the human element in science."
A solid account of some memorable squabbles reminds readers that scientists are as prone to turf wars and ego trips as any other mortals. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"Natural history is one of the few sciences that lends itself to enjoyably larking about ideas and hypotheses as well as having its sober sides, and Lavers takes full advantage of its propensity for entertaining erudition."
Provocative stabs at answering the really big questions regarding wildlife biology, the ones seemingly skipped over when the Victorians tidied up their discipline of natural history. Read full book review >
PRIME MOVER by Steven Vogel
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"The author's interests seemingly know no bounds, and he takes the reader along with him on a complex, absorbing journey of exploration notable for its unexpected twists and turns. (100 line drawings)"
Bioengineer Vogel (Cats' Paws and Catapaults, 1998, etc.) lucidly explains the nature of muscle and examines how it has shaped human history, culture, and technology. Read full book review >
BONES by Elaine Dewar
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"The New World may well be another Old World, and hoary parables may speak as loudly as DNA testing in the search to answer Dewar's question."
Where did North Americans come from way back when, asks Canadian journalist Dewar (Cloak of Green, not reviewed, etc.), in this eye-opening study for laypeople that debates the merits of archaeological theories swirling about the question. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"A sanguine assessment of our sanguinary times."
A former Assistant Secretary of Defense in the Clinton administration, currently dean of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, optimistically predicts that the US will retain its current dominance in world affairs. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2001

Canadian medical journalist Abraham debuts with this well-detailed chronicle clarifying what happened to Einstein's brain after his death. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 13, 2001

"A chilling account, but Andrews and Nelkin's Luddite tendencies are as worrisome as the abuses they document."
Two academics sound the alarm against an invasion of the body snatchers. Read full book review >
1831 by Louis P. Masur
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"An intelligent and imaginative historical essay with a few pieces missing."
A history of one year in the United States. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >