Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 167)

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Laudable effort to bridge the gap between ordinary readers and science at its weirdest."
The science editor of the Dallas Morning News turns from the digital information frontier (The Bit and the Pendulum, 2000) to a penetrating study of how some of the most brilliant scientific minds have perceived and anticipated reality. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A useful companion to Wallace's—and Darwin's—own writings, and a fine contribution to the history of science."
A scholarly appraisal of the curious life and work of the naturalist who, some insist, was the true father of the theory of evolution. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 21, 2002

"A rigorously researched, clever, and obliquely feminist look at what happens over the ages when the Pygmalion complex is closeted in a well-equipped workshop."
British journalist Wood profiles roboticists with castration complexes and other men, both real and fictional, who thought they might somehow be able to create life. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 13, 2002

"Hardheaded rationalists will likely take this with a shakerful of salt, but technology enthusiasts, aviation buffs, and UFO watchers should find it fascinating."
When Nazis, flying saucers, and government conspiracies figure in a single narrative, you've got the makings of either a crackpot manifesto or an intriguing work of scientific speculation. Thankfully, the aviation editor for Jane's Defence Weekly delivers the latter. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"By no means anti-evolutionary fodder for creationists, but rather a cautionary tale of how science gets done—and undone."
Knowledgeable freelance journalist Hooper (Would the Buddha Wear a Walkman?, 1990) shoots down an icon of evolution in action—in a well-written account of the life and times of the peppered moth and the eccentric lepidopterists who chased it. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: July 22, 2002

"Will engage an audience specifically interested in American Special Forces, but better written and more compelling accounts of the almost all of the military operations chronicled here are easily accessible to more general readers."
An introduction to the US Air Force's helicopter rescue units, coauthored by a pilot who flew several of their most notable missions. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 10, 2002

"A suggestive report on an avant-garde science, though a bit too enthusiastic for specialists and a bit too specialized for general readers."
Ward (Virtual Organisms, 2000), a BBC technology reporter, explains the big claims that have stemmed from an obscure mathematical theory. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2002

"An exhilarating exposition of provocative if extreme ideas."
Never one to shrink from controversy, biologist Margulis (Geosciences/Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst) and son Dorion (Biospheres, 1990) proclaim with predictable bombast that "symbiogenesis," the inheritance of acquired genomes, is the prime mover of evolution, by far outranking the role of adaptive mutations in creating new species. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2002

"Just the thing for the budding entrepreneur, and a pleasure for general readers as well."
An intriguing tale of inventors, tycoons, and an engineering feat that changed the course of economic history. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 12, 2002

"A revealing look at the ins and outs of scientific research—and the ups and downs of collaboration and competition among scientists."
Easy-reading first-person account of research into the effectiveness of using fetal dopamine cells to treat Parkinson's disease, a venture that aroused controversy not just for its use of cells from human embryos but because the double-blind study called for half the patients to undergo sham brain surgery. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: June 5, 2002

"Morris's afterword makes it clear that science doesn't have all the answers—perhaps never will—but it's diverting and instructive at least to see the process."
Really big questions: Morris, a physicist who writes frequently on science, borrows a leaf from the philosopher's book to discourse engagingly on God, time, truth, mind, and such like. Read full book review >
THE PERFECT STORE by Adam Cohen
NON-FICTION
Released: June 5, 2002

"An in-depth, if credulous, look at an Internet pioneer."
A journalist's admiring history of eBay, written with a dated enthusiam for the new economy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >