Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 167)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 9, 1998

"While some of the issues here will seem esoteric to most American readers, this is a valuable and well-argued document in one of the key philosophical debates of our time."
This latest volley in the ugly squabble between scientists and literary intellectuals was a sensation in France. Read full book review >
SYMBIOTIC PLANET by Lynn Margulis
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 9, 1998

"This is vintage Margulis—personal, autobiographical, passionate, argumentative, at times over the top, but full of ideas—at least some of which, in the past, have proved to be right."
Let's hear it for the bugs— not your creepy-crawlies, but bacteria, the be-all (and possible end-all) of life on Earth, according to Margulis. Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 2, 1998

"Carson devotees will already be familiar with some of this material; the more casual (if no less admiring) fan will find in this collection an engaging glimpse into the breadth of Carson's curiosity and the fashioning of her public voice as a defender of the environment."
Biographer Lear (Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature, 1997) knits together here a number of Rachel Carson's writings—often much more personal, quirky, and searching than her celebrated books—that add meat to her body of literary/scientific writing. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"More important than this clearly optimistic vision are the cogent arguments about our evolutionary path to date and that make possible the uniquely human qualities of language, culture, and civilization."
Building on earlier ideas (presented in The Runaway Brain, 1993, and Exons, Introns and Talking Genes, 1991), Wills, an English evolutionary biologist transplanted to the Univ. of Calif., San Diego, makes a cogent case for the continued and even more rapid future evolution of our species. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 24, 1998

"Clear and down-to-earth; even hopeless technophobes should find it enlightening. (Author tour)"
Here's a straightforward answer to the question every parent has been asked, and few can answer: How do computers really work? Read full book review >

WHAT REMAINS TO BE DISCOVERED by John Maddox
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 20, 1998

"A must-read for students of science. (Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selection)"
Despite some smug statements to the contrary, the work of science is far from complete; here a former editor of Nature takes a look at the uncharted territory ahead. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 19, 1998

"Never before had our planet seemed so small, so lonely, so vulnerable—or so priceless. (photos, not seen)"
The year 1968 is memorable for any number of reasons, science writer Zimmerman reminds us, not the least of which was the historic flight of Apollo 8, the first manned space flight to slip out of Earth's gravitational tethers. Read full book review >
BEYOND THE HORIZONS by Walter J. Boyne
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 16, 1998

"A perhaps overly comprehensive encomium for an American firm, this volume carries a heavy payload that limits performance. (illustrations)"
Historian Boyne (a retired colonel in the air force and author of Beyond the Wild Blue, 1997, etc.) offers a long and laudatory history of Lockheed (now Lockheed-Martin), a mainstay of the military-industrial complex. Read full book review >
THE VICTORIAN INTERNET by Tom Standage
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 15, 1998

"Recommended to fans of scientific history. (b&w illustrations)"
The telegraph, which now seems a curious relic, was once cutting-edge technology, every bit as hot, Standage reminds us, as today's Internet. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 14, 1998

"Instead, here's a challenging mishmash."
This look at heterodox approaches to postmodern technology veers all over the map, leaving little room for informed comments on pertinent subtopics. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 12, 1998

"Few could be more knowledgeable than she is in guiding us through such hot topics."
The Chinese curse, "May you live in interesting times," is particularly apt in light of the progress scientists are making now in mapping and sequencing the human genome. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 7, 1998

"Gently iconoclastic, always illuminating essays from the science writer whose prose can bring to life not only theories but even the fossils themselves. (30 b&w illustrations)"
In the latest selection from this self-described "essay-machine," Gould gathers together sundry Natural History columns, mingling natural history knowhow with his characteristic humanist outlook. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >