Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 167)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 16, 1995

"Slouka's impassioned, intelligent essay makes an important contribution to the cultural assessment of cyberspace. (Author tour)"
A persuasive and much-needed humanistic response to the fevered rhetoric surrounding the information superhighway, virtual reality, and other digital technologies. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 2, 1995

A physicist's attempt to reconnect science and theology on the controversial subject of extraterrestrial intelligence. Read full book review >

A FIELD GUIDE TO GERMS by Wayne Biddle
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"A truly delightful book that manages to impart solid information about some pretty dreadful diseases without depressing or terrifying the reader."
Entertaining, irreverent, but always informative profiles of some 70 pathogens, mostly bacteria and viruses, that share our planet and sometimes our bodies. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"A book that should make the current surge of environmental glad-tiders sit back and reconsider. (Author tour)"
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"But while her basic premise on physics as theology overstates the case, Wertheim's text has other merits: She brings to light fascinating details of the lives and times of many exceptional women and men who have helped shape our current worldview."
Are physicists a priesthood excluding women on age-old grounds that women can't be ``ordained''? Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

In this terrific biography of the LeakeysLouis, Mary, and Richardscience journalist Morell manages to be exhaustive while keeping things nimble. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"The New York subway's modern minstrels are a lyrical subject that here undergoes a lengthy and pedantic scrutiny in a prose devoid of lyricism. (27 b&w photos, not seen)"
A community activist details the culture and conflicts of New York subway music, from bucket-drummers to city bureaucrats. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Small is the first to admit she doesn't have all the answers; what she does point out is how much lore we need to unlearn, and that is the beginning of wisdom. (15 b&w photos, not seen)"
The short answer is, ``Not much.'' Small (Anthropology/Cornell) is a student of primate behavior, particularly pertaining to mating and parenting. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 1, 1995

"Novelistic suspense, strong characterization, plus state-of- the-art crime-solving add up to a natural for summer reading lists. (Author tour)"
A propulsive true-crime thriller about the first use of DNA fingerprinting to nab—and ultimately execute—an American murderer. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 1, 1995

"Although at times excruciatingly abstract, Betsky is constantly thought-provoking and delightfully challenging. (210 b&w photos, not seen, and line illustrations)"
An enchanting journey into the history of architecture and the physical construction of space. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 1, 1995

"Nevertheless, the founding fathers appear in an interesting new light, thanks to Cohen's fresh, not to say iconoclastic, vision."
A fascinating study of how Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and James Madison applied science to their political thinking. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 1, 1995

"This account of man's romance with flight doesn't break any new ground but offers a good grounding in the field as well as thoughts to ponder about the impact of aviation on modern life."
Flying in the face of redundancy, aviation journalist and pilot Scott concisely chronicles the history of manned flight from its faltering first steps to its later deadly application above the WW I battlefield. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >