Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 167)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 1, 1997

"In sum, the authors provide a good answer to multiregionalism but kindle even more fires to spark future debates on who, what, and why we are. (55 illustrations)"
As surely as night follows day, one could expect a retort to the multiregional evolution of Homo sapiens as expounded by Milford Wolpoff et al. Read full book review >
HIJACKED by Dave Hirschman
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: July 1, 1997

"A moving portrait of three quiet heroes."
The gripping record of a ``routine'' Federal Express fast- freight flight between Memphis and San Jose in April 1994 that went horribly wrong. Read full book review >

THE HUMAN BRAIN by Susan A. Greenfield
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 18, 1997

For the lay reader, a British scientist offers an enlightening look at the human brain and mind, clarifying what researchers now know and what difficult and tantalizing questions they are still struggling to answer. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 18, 1997

"Must reading for dinosaur fans."
A top dinosaur paleontologist spins wondrous tales about his fieldworkand ponders what it means. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 12, 1997

"It would be nice if everything worked out as the authors hope; but the prudent traveler into the future will be prepared to abandon his luggage more than once on the way to the year 2020. (Author tour)"
Here's the latest effort by two science writers who've made a career of forecasting the future of science and technology. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 11, 1997

"This book captures his spirit at its best."
The final book by the late science populist (The Demon-Haunted World, 1996, etc.) shows him in his role as one of the finest exponents of science for the general public. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: June 6, 1997

"Others may see this as an interesting study that suggests the complexity of a phenomenon more convincingly than it accounts for it. (15 illustrations, not seen)"
This leftist academic examination of our collective fascination with dieting depicts it as a manifestation of capitalist consumer culture duking it out with the secular remnants of puritanism. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 4, 1997

"If, as they say, everything in life is a matter of timing, DeSalle and Lindley could hardly have brought out a book at a more propitious time. (illustrations, not seen)"
Physicist Lindley (The End of Physics, 1993) and DeSalle, a DNA-in-amber expert at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, have a fine time taking to task the tangled web Michael Crichton has spun in his Jurassic Park books and movies. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 4, 1997

"Recommended for all time-pressured type As."
An amusing, informative account of how different cultures and subcultures have different concepts of time. Read full book review >
NASA/TREK by Constance Penley
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: June 1, 1997

"Boldly—and successfully—goes where no one has gone before. (20 b&w photos, not seen)"
A clever and iconoclastic dual portrait of the NASA space program and Star Trek fandom from a feminist perspective. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1997

"Still, these are minor lapses in what is otherwise a sturdy and erudite overview of one of the most complex periods of thought."
Everdell (The End of Kings, 1983) presents one of the more accessible studies of early Modernism (up to WW I), relying on a ``big name'' approach to dissect the meanings of one of the most slippery terms in all of cultural criticism. Read full book review >
BIOMIMICRY by Janine M. Benyus
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 1, 1997

"Much of interest here, but spare us the cheerleading."
``Doing it nature's way'' is the theme of this wide-eyed-with-wonder exposition of what's going on in a variety of fields—from farming to computer science—as scientists try to emulate natural processes. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Andrea Beaty
August 30, 2016

In Andrea Beaty and David Roberts’ new picture book Ada Twist, Scientist is like her classmates, builder Iggy and inventor Rosie: scientist Ada, a character of color, has a boundless imagination and has always been hopelessly curious. Why are there pointy things stuck to a rose? Why are there hairs growing inside your nose? When her house fills with a horrific, toe-curling smell, Ada knows it’s up to her to find the source. Not afraid of failure, she embarks on a fact-finding mission and conducts scientific experiments, all in the name of discovery. But this time, her experiments lead to even more stink and get her into trouble! Inspired by real-life makers such as Ada Lovelace and Marie Curie, Ada Twist, Scientist champions girl power and women scientists, and brings welcome diversity to picture books about girls in science. “Cool and stylish,” our reviewer writes. View video >