Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 167)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1997

"Kanigel's lively prose and sense of irony make this biography an enjoyable read. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A circumspect biography of America's first efficiency expert, sensitive to both Taylor's limitations and his impact on the world. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"A good survey not only of infinity, but of the scientific revolutions that have grown out of our attempts to grapple with the concept."
The idea of the infinite has baffled thinkers since ancient times; now a top science writer tries to shed light on the concept. Read full book review >

T. REX AND THE CRATER OF DOOM by Walter Alvarez
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

An explanation of the end of the dinosaurs, by the Berkeley geologist who helped promulgate the theory. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"There is much joy and beauty in this passage from speculation to demonstration, and we have Ferris to thank for his superb rendering, both of the shebang and of the science that studies the shebang. (Book-of-the-Month Club split main selection; History Book Club alternate selection)"
As Virgil led Dante through the thickets and circles of the inferno, so Ferris, a science writer's science writer, guides the reader through the clouds and bubbles, the singularities and uncertainties that characterize cosmology today. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"Authoritative and valuable historically, though because of Pais's remoteness, not widely appealing as an autobiography. (24 b&w photos)"
The author of a highly regarded biography of Albert Einstein (Subtle Is the Lord, not reviewed; Einstein Lived Here, 1994) sums up his own life. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1997

"As entertaining as an adventure novel, but with a deadly serious message, this is a valuable addition to the growing body of literature on emerging viruses. (Author tour)"
A virologist's breezy account of a career spent battling deadly diseases in the lab and in the field. Read full book review >
THE LIFE OF THE COSMOS by Lee Smolin
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"The early chapters are slow going, but once his argument builds up momentum, Smolin is a thought-provoking theorist."
Physics has long assumed that the laws of nature are immutable; here's a cosmological theory that challenges even that common-sense notion. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 25, 1997

"Dewdney manages to make this catalog of error entertaining as well as instructive; good medicine for both skeptics and true believers."
Why do good scientists fall into error? Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 14, 1997

"Especially interesting to those who have experienced psychotherapy or are considering it."
``I am a microsurgeon of the mind,'' announces the author, in this unusually engaging presentation of her theory about how psychotherapy alters the way the brain operates and thus how the mind works. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 9, 1997

"In sum, some old, some new variations on the question of design (or the lack of it) in nature, by an old hand, who, if he hasn't quite the style of Stephen Jay Gould, is nonetheless well worth reading."
Williams (Ecology and Evolution/SUNY, Stony Brook) explores how organisms have evolved in nature to ``solve the problems of life.'' Williams accepts the so-called ``adaptationist program'' of ``plan and purpose'' in biology: that is, the idea that each attribute of an organism relates in some way to its efforts to survive and pass on its genes. Read full book review >
IMAGINED WORLDS by Freeman Dyson
RELIGION
Released: April 1, 1997

"Essential reading for anyone who looks beyond the coming millennium."
A leading scientist speculates on far-future scientific developments and their possible impact on the human condition. Read full book review >
THE LARGE, THE SMALL AND THE HUMAN MIND by Roger Penrose
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1997

"Penrose pushes the available analytical tools to the limit, and the result is far from light reading, but those willing to think hard about fundamental questions of mind and matter will find this discussion provocative and rewarding."
Lectures by a renowned mathematician and physicist on the connections of relativity and quantum theory (the science of the very large and the very small), with an eye to understanding the nature of the mind. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >