Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 167)

SYMBIOTIC PLANET by Lynn Margulis
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 9, 1998

"This is vintage Margulis—personal, autobiographical, passionate, argumentative, at times over the top, but full of ideas—at least some of which, in the past, have proved to be right."
Let's hear it for the bugs— not your creepy-crawlies, but bacteria, the be-all (and possible end-all) of life on Earth, according to Margulis. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 2, 1998

"Carson devotees will already be familiar with some of this material; the more casual (if no less admiring) fan will find in this collection an engaging glimpse into the breadth of Carson's curiosity and the fashioning of her public voice as a defender of the environment."
Biographer Lear (Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature, 1997) knits together here a number of Rachel Carson's writings—often much more personal, quirky, and searching than her celebrated books—that add meat to her body of literary/scientific writing. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"More important than this clearly optimistic vision are the cogent arguments about our evolutionary path to date and that make possible the uniquely human qualities of language, culture, and civilization."
Building on earlier ideas (presented in The Runaway Brain, 1993, and Exons, Introns and Talking Genes, 1991), Wills, an English evolutionary biologist transplanted to the Univ. of Calif., San Diego, makes a cogent case for the continued and even more rapid future evolution of our species. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 24, 1998

"Clear and down-to-earth; even hopeless technophobes should find it enlightening. (Author tour)"
Here's a straightforward answer to the question every parent has been asked, and few can answer: How do computers really work? Read full book review >
WHAT REMAINS TO BE DISCOVERED by John Maddox
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 20, 1998

"A must-read for students of science. (Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selection)"
Despite some smug statements to the contrary, the work of science is far from complete; here a former editor of Nature takes a look at the uncharted territory ahead. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 19, 1998

"Never before had our planet seemed so small, so lonely, so vulnerable—or so priceless. (photos, not seen)"
The year 1968 is memorable for any number of reasons, science writer Zimmerman reminds us, not the least of which was the historic flight of Apollo 8, the first manned space flight to slip out of Earth's gravitational tethers. Read full book review >
BEYOND THE HORIZONS by Walter J. Boyne
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 16, 1998

"A perhaps overly comprehensive encomium for an American firm, this volume carries a heavy payload that limits performance. (illustrations)"
Historian Boyne (a retired colonel in the air force and author of Beyond the Wild Blue, 1997, etc.) offers a long and laudatory history of Lockheed (now Lockheed-Martin), a mainstay of the military-industrial complex. Read full book review >
THE VICTORIAN INTERNET by Tom Standage
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 15, 1998

"Recommended to fans of scientific history. (b&w illustrations)"
The telegraph, which now seems a curious relic, was once cutting-edge technology, every bit as hot, Standage reminds us, as today's Internet. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 14, 1998

"Instead, here's a challenging mishmash."
This look at heterodox approaches to postmodern technology veers all over the map, leaving little room for informed comments on pertinent subtopics. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 12, 1998

"Few could be more knowledgeable than she is in guiding us through such hot topics."
The Chinese curse, "May you live in interesting times," is particularly apt in light of the progress scientists are making now in mapping and sequencing the human genome. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 7, 1998

"Gently iconoclastic, always illuminating essays from the science writer whose prose can bring to life not only theories but even the fossils themselves. (30 b&w illustrations)"
In the latest selection from this self-described "essay-machine," Gould gathers together sundry Natural History columns, mingling natural history knowhow with his characteristic humanist outlook. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"May not make many converts, but should stimulate a brisk discussion among psychiatrists and other interested parties. (b&w illustrations)"
A biopsychologist deeply skeptical of the widely accepted biochemical approach to mental illness presents a well-documented argument against it. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >