Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 168)

BIOMIMICRY by Janine M. Benyus
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 1, 1997

"Much of interest here, but spare us the cheerleading."
``Doing it nature's way'' is the theme of this wide-eyed-with-wonder exposition of what's going on in a variety of fields—from farming to computer science—as scientists try to emulate natural processes. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 1997

"Muddled intentions, combined with the unconvincing specter of a world full of HALs controlling their makers, diminish Rawlins's latest effort to enlighten us about our future."
An uninspiring review of the history of the computer, and an evaluation of its impact on our society today and in decades to come. Read full book review >

STUFF by Ivan Amato
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 7, 1997

"It is a heady time for this new discipline, and Amato gives a good sense of its energy and potential. (illustrations, not seen)"
Materials science sees the world as fodder for new and better structural materials; here's an overview of this new discipline. Read full book review >
THE WISDOM OF THE BODY by Sherwin B. Nuland
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 5, 1997

"To read this book is to share his awe. (8 drawings, not seen) (First printing of 200,000)"
From the author of the National Book Awardwinning How We Die (1994), another eloquent, thought-provoking dissertation, this time on what we are. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1997

"Kanigel's lively prose and sense of irony make this biography an enjoyable read. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A circumspect biography of America's first efficiency expert, sensitive to both Taylor's limitations and his impact on the world. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"A good survey not only of infinity, but of the scientific revolutions that have grown out of our attempts to grapple with the concept."
The idea of the infinite has baffled thinkers since ancient times; now a top science writer tries to shed light on the concept. Read full book review >
T. REX AND THE CRATER OF DOOM by Walter Alvarez
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

An explanation of the end of the dinosaurs, by the Berkeley geologist who helped promulgate the theory. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"There is much joy and beauty in this passage from speculation to demonstration, and we have Ferris to thank for his superb rendering, both of the shebang and of the science that studies the shebang. (Book-of-the-Month Club split main selection; History Book Club alternate selection)"
As Virgil led Dante through the thickets and circles of the inferno, so Ferris, a science writer's science writer, guides the reader through the clouds and bubbles, the singularities and uncertainties that characterize cosmology today. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"Authoritative and valuable historically, though because of Pais's remoteness, not widely appealing as an autobiography. (24 b&w photos)"
The author of a highly regarded biography of Albert Einstein (Subtle Is the Lord, not reviewed; Einstein Lived Here, 1994) sums up his own life. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1997

"As entertaining as an adventure novel, but with a deadly serious message, this is a valuable addition to the growing body of literature on emerging viruses. (Author tour)"
A virologist's breezy account of a career spent battling deadly diseases in the lab and in the field. Read full book review >
THE LIFE OF THE COSMOS by Lee Smolin
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 1, 1997

"The early chapters are slow going, but once his argument builds up momentum, Smolin is a thought-provoking theorist."
Physics has long assumed that the laws of nature are immutable; here's a cosmological theory that challenges even that common-sense notion. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 25, 1997

"Dewdney manages to make this catalog of error entertaining as well as instructive; good medicine for both skeptics and true believers."
Why do good scientists fall into error? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Andrea Beaty
August 30, 2016

In Andrea Beaty and David Roberts’ new picture book Ada Twist, Scientist is like her classmates, builder Iggy and inventor Rosie: scientist Ada, a character of color, has a boundless imagination and has always been hopelessly curious. Why are there pointy things stuck to a rose? Why are there hairs growing inside your nose? When her house fills with a horrific, toe-curling smell, Ada knows it’s up to her to find the source. Not afraid of failure, she embarks on a fact-finding mission and conducts scientific experiments, all in the name of discovery. But this time, her experiments lead to even more stink and get her into trouble! Inspired by real-life makers such as Ada Lovelace and Marie Curie, Ada Twist, Scientist champions girl power and women scientists, and brings welcome diversity to picture books about girls in science. “Cool and stylish,” our reviewer writes. View video >