Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 168)

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 1999

THE UNIVERSE, THE ELEVENTH DIMENSION, AND EVERYTHINGWhat We Know and How We Know ItMorris, Richard Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 6, 1999

"For the open-minded, however, this is a breathtaking feat of scholarship that will have enduring value as an encyclopedic source of hard data and inspired speculation. (Photos, not seen)"
An extraordinary body of scholarship that is as much a social and psychological history of women as child-bearers—and more—as a review of male and female biology and behavior across many species, particularly kindred primates. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 4, 1999

"While the actual math is heavy going, Aczel gives a very readable account of the science and the scientists involved."
In 1912, Albert Einstein wrote down an equation that describes the structure of the universe. Read full book review >
FRENCH DNA by Paul Rabinow
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Part play-by-play of the internal struggles of a prominent genetics research facility in France, part abstract philosophical debate on genetic issues, this half-baked case study meanders too far off course for its narrative aspirations."
The dated story of a genetics research endeavor in the early 1990s as recounted by anthropologist Rabinow (UC Berkeley). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Of most interest to fans, but the science is still solid. (Author tour)"
TV's popular X-Files, criticized for peddling woo-woo ideas, is actually careful to preserve scientific accuracy'so says the show's science consultant. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 10, 1999

"An adroit chronology of the art of tracking and the revelations that trail in its wake. (illustrations)"
Lockley (Tracking Dinosaurs, not reviewed) takes an informed, latitudinarian look at fossil footprints, spoor, and other traces left by passing animals, including humans, to see what they can tell us about everything from science to spirituality. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 9, 1999

"What he has to say about infection, cancer, aging, and genome research carries a sufficient weight of scientific wisdom by itself to bear attending—on the art of policymakers, health professionals, and the public itself."
Marry Freud to brain circuitry and use that linkage to indict modern biomedical science: this is the aim of Pollack, former Columbia College dean, now professor of biological sciences in this intense, provocative volume. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 9, 1999

"Well worth your time."
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 7, 1999

"Welsome's stunning book adds much to that literature, and it makes for sobering reading."
A fierce exposÇ of governmental duplicity and dangerous science. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 7, 1999

"An engrossing, challenging work that more than answers the question its title raises. (For two other studies of earliest childhood development, see John Bruer, The Myth of the First Three Years, p. 1010, and Alison Gopnik, et al., The Scientist in the Crib, p. 1016.)"
This guided tour of "the wrinkly universe inside each child's head" will fascinate most readers, but some may find themselves lost amid its complexity. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"A workmanlike job, covering the main events and key players of one of the great stories in modern science. (67 photos, 9 ilustrations)"
Every schoolchild now knows that the dinosaurs were killed off by a meteor, but it took a while for scientists to accept the idea. Read full book review >
THE ARITHMETIC OF LIFE by George Shaffner
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Shines light into several interesting corners of everyday life, often with surprising results—and the numbers don't lie."
"Life can make sense," is the motto of this forthright little book, and all it takes is a little math. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >