Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 168)

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1997

"A provocative look at some of the central questions about what makes us human; strongly recommended."
How do organisms whose behavior is apparently determined by ``selfish genes'' become social beings, let alone altruists and saints? Read full book review >
FANFARE FOR EARTH by Jr. McSween
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1997

"While nothing in science is ever the last word, this finely argued and well-written volume can be expected to stand as an excellent summary of what science knows about the Earth on the threshold of the 21st century."
Those who see geology as the dullest of sciences overlook the likes of McSween, who shows his style in this sprightly treatment of the origin of Earth. Read full book review >

GROOMING, GOSSIP, AND THE EVOLUTION OF LANGUAGE by Robin Dunbar
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Where else could you learn that it takes a village to grow a neocortex or that, to reproduce the best genes, women network and men advertise?"
Fascinating theories and cogent insights into why and how we use language, as learned from our simian relatives. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1997

"But Jourdain knows enough to keep us listening."
A layman's primer on the psychology and history of the human response to music. Read full book review >
THIS IS BIOLOGY by Ernst Mayr
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 1, 1997

"Faced with this didactic piece, let us hope that there is still more to come from Mayr—an autobiography or at least a glimpse of the life and times of one of biology's greats."
Here is the doyen of systematics/taxonomy—a biologist who has witnessed the major revolutions in the field in the 20th century. Read full book review >

THE HUNT FOR LIFE ON MARS by Donald Goldsmith
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 10, 1997

"His book will have a short but vigorous life, the best account available until new ones supersede it. (15 b&w photos, not seen) (First printing of 40,000; Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club selection)"
Goldsmith (who edited the 1991 PBS series on astronomy and wrote its companion volume, The Astronomers) reports on the biggest science story of 1996: NASA's claim to have discovered that life once existed on Mars. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"But most of Virtuous Reality comes off as old material repackaged and peppered with some vituperative commentary. (illustrations, not seen)"
A preachy, uninspired tract on the technological, moral, and media changes in America, by Wired magazine's media critic. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"A solid, thoroughly enjoyable presentation of almost everything a layman might find useful about one of the strangest planets in our solar system."
Venus is sometimes described as Earth's twin planet; here's an up-to-date look at that world next door. Read full book review >
HUBBLE'S UNIVERSE by Simon Goodwin
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"727, etc.), provides a preface."
Mars seen from the relatively close distance of 103 million kilometers; the stormy Great Red Spot above Jupiter's surface; a possible continent or sea spied through the smoggy haze that surrounds the moon Titan; a nebula with gaseous columns so dense and craggy they appear like a heavenly rock formation. Read full book review >
BLOOD AND WATER by Dan Kurzman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Spellbinding and deeply sobering military history."
In history that reads like a great thriller, award-winning former Washington Post reporter Kurzman (Left to Die: The Tragedy of the USS Juneau, 1994, etc.) tells the story of the Allied effort to derail the Nazi quest to develop a nuclear bomb. Read full book review >
RACE AND HUMAN EVOLUTION by Milford Wolpoff
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Readers can rest assured that the last word has not been heard."
If science thrives on controversy, then this study is surely the latest blow from the ``multiregional evolutionary hypothesis'' corner, duking it out with the Out-of-Africa champions. Read full book review >
ISLANDS IN SPACE AND TIME by David G. Campbell
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 7, 1996

"All in all, a fine testimonial to the Nature Conservancy's ongoing work."
An information-dense, beautifully illustrated tour of ten endangered landscapes. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

From Morgan Matson, the bestselling author of Since You’ve Been Gone, comes The Unexpected Everything, a feel-good YA novel of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >