Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 17)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 15, 2008

"Even readers with only a layperson's knowledge of evolution will learn marvelous things about the unity of all organisms since the beginning of life."
How human bones, organs and behavior reveal the history we share with fish, flies, worms and germs. Read full book review >
THE LIVING COSMOS by Chris Impey
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 18, 2007

"A skillful account of the universe, the nature of life and where in the universe life might occur."
Lively, clear and up-to-date overview of astronomy, cosmology, biology and evolution, specifically as related to the search for extraterrestrial life. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 8, 2007

"Not everything is as easy as pie (or pi) to grasp, and therein lies the excitement and challenge of science, masterfully conveyed here."
Decrying smug scientific illiteracy, New York Times science writer Angier (Woman, 1999, etc.) deftly sets forth the universally accepted principles underlying basic science that everyone should understand. Read full book review >
EINSTEIN by Walter Isaacson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 10, 2007

"An exemplary biography, at once sympathetic and unsparing. Readers will admire Einstein's greatness as a thinker, but they will now know that he, like all other idols, had feet of clay. See Jürgen Neffe's Einstein (2007) for more on the subject."
A comprehensive and marvelously readable life of the eminent scientist—and more, the eminent counter-culturalist, rebel, humanist and philanderer. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 6, 2007

"An inviting introduction to modern cosmology and philosophy with no prerequisites other than the willingness to entertain counterfactuals, imponderables and leaps of faith. Nicely done."
A vade mecum for head-scratchers by the multifaceted Frayn (The Copenhagen Papers, 2001, etc.), whose philosophical concerns are notably many and well attested in his body of work. Read full book review >

THE SCIENTIST AS REBEL by Freeman Dyson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 2006

"Studded with wondrous gems—and just enough provocation to stimulate debate."
British-born polymath physicist Dyson (The Sun, the Genome, and the Internet, 1999, etc.) addresses the most controversial issues of the day with a sharp mind unblunted by time. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2006

"Top-flight debunking takes all the air out of the moon race."
An exposé arguing that the Apollo Program conned taxpayers and provided a lavish, risky ego trip for technocrats and politicians. Read full book review >
THE ARCHITECTURE OF HAPPINESS by Alain de Botton
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 3, 2006

"A lyrical and generously illustrated monograph about the intimate relationship between our buildings and ourselves. (To be a three-part PBS series, Fall 2006)"
Graceful disquisition on the significance of architecture, by a novelist and essayist whose eclectic interests range from How Proust Can Change Your Life (1997) to Status Anxiety (2004). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 7, 2006

"An important reference for anyone interested in this forgotten scientist and his still-vibrant ideas."
Erudite yet highly accessible biography of the Prussian explorer and naturalist who altered the 19th century's intellectual climate and became the godfather of the American environmental movement. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 10, 2006

"Fascinating look at how politics and science intersected in the glory years of NASA."
The story of the space race, from an angle only insiders knew until now. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 1, 2006

"Well-written and intelligent: a must for aviation buffs, and convincing back-up for Charles Lindbergh's appreciative comment that the 747 was 'one of the great ones.'"
Detailed and absorbing memoir by the engineer who led Boeing's development of the world's most commercially successful airplane. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: May 2, 2006

"Well written, congenial, and full of lore—about both England and the history of science."
A brief history of science, in the context of a walking tour along the Greenwich meridian. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >