Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 2)

THE FAMILY GENE by Joselin Linder
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 14, 2017

"Linder successfully integrates cutting-edge genetic research into her personal quest."
How the author and her family have come to terms with the knowledge that they are the carriers of a fatal genetic mutation. Read full book review >
MAKING SENSE OF SCIENCE by Cornelia Dean
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 13, 2017

"Dean's long and varied experience in the world of science reporting makes for an articulate, well-structured, and easily understood account filled with good stories and sound advice."
That "the human mind is a sink of irrationality" is the assumption behind this engagingly written guidebook. Read full book review >

INFERNO by Steven Hatch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Despite occasional long-windedness, Hatch's analysis is intelligent, nuanced, and tempered, a necessary departure from the panicked response of most American media outlets."
An American doctor describes his experiences in Liberia during the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic. Read full book review >
THINKING MACHINES by Luke Dormehl
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 7, 2017

"Not everyone approves. Dormehl lets critics have their say but makes a convincing, often disturbing, but always-entertaining case that that we're in for a wild ride."
A history of artificial intelligence and look at the "dazzling (near) future, the changes that lurk just around the corner, and how they will transform our lives forever." Read full book review >
WILD NIGHTS by Benjamin Reiss
HISTORY
Released: March 7, 2017

"A fresh approach to a familiar phenomenon."
A thorough probing into why sleep is such a problem for so many in contemporary society. Read full book review >

IRRESISTIBLE by Adam Alter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A clearly written account of a widespread social malady that is sure to gain further attention in coming years."
How interactive technologies facilitate newly debilitating addictions. Read full book review >
THE INHERITANCE by Niki Kapsambelis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"An educational and emotional chronicle that should resonate with a wide variety of readers."
In her debut, journalist Kapsambelis builds a compelling narrative about Alzheimer's disease around one North Dakota extended family. Read full book review >
THE DEATH AND LIFE OF THE GREAT LAKES by Dan Egan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"Not light reading but essential for policymakers—and highly recommended for the 40 million people who rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water."
An alarming account of the "slow-motion catastrophe" facing the world's largest freshwater system. Read full book review >
HOW EMOTIONS ARE MADE by Lisa Feldman Barrett
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 7, 2017

"A highly informative, readable, and wide-ranging discussion of 'how psychology, neuroscience, and related disciplines are moving away from the search for emotion fingerprints and instead asking how emotions are constructed.'"
A well-argued, entertaining disputation of the prevailing view that emotion and reason are at odds. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"A sharp analysis of an increasingly pressing problem, but Nichols falls short of proposing a satisfying solution."
Some fresh twists on a familiar theme: the dumbing down of America amid the defiant distrust of expertise. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A thoroughly researched, clearly presented book that suggests that imprecise brain science will become increasingly more common as evidence in criminal cases."
American Bar Association Journal editor Davis (Defending the Damned: Inside Chicago's Cook County Public Defender's Office, 2007, etc.) engagingly explores how sophisticated brain studies might help explain the causes of violent crimes. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"An unsettling but informative and sometimes-optimistic view of mostly legitimate efforts at life extension."
An enlightening tour of transhumanism, the movement dedicated to radically prolonging human life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >