Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 2)

PINPOINT by Greg Milner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 3, 2016

"Milner has done his homework, assuring readers will be satisfied, educated, and occasionally amazed."
What universal digital service is essential to the world's infrastructure and our daily lives? Yes, the Internet, but more fundamentally, the Global Positioning System. Read full book review >
VISUAL INTELLIGENCE by Amy E. Herman
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 3, 2016

"Sharp and original, this book should alter how readers look at the world."
A comprehensive guide to seeing what others do not, distilled from art historian Herman's acclaimed seminar The Art of Perception. Read full book review >

TRACK CHANGES by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 2, 2016

"Materiality, information, and absence: as Kirschenbaum rightly notes, literature is 'different after word processing,' and so is literary history. He makes a solid start in showing how."
A learned and lively study of the sometimes-uneasy fit between writing on a computer and writing generally. Read full book review >
THE GREAT ACCELERATION by Robert Colvile
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2016

"A familiar argument but with interesting twists and a rosier forecast than many other books of social/technological criticism."
A well-paced consideration of the effects of technology on lives made ever busier by it—and whipping by in a whirlwind as a result. Read full book review >
SORTING THE BEEF FROM THE BULL by Richard Evershed
FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 26, 2016

"Not pleasant reading for the faint of stomach, but a valuable guide for serious, conscientious shoppers."
A disturbing look at how unscrupulous entrepreneurs can tamper with our food supply. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 26, 2016

"Williams delivers a complex tale about a complex disease, and by sharing a narrative rich in detail, personalities, and New York scenes, she will ease the burdens of those immediately affected and inform others of progress in cancer research."
Who would have thought a book about being diagnosed with stage 4 melanoma could be exhilarating and entertaining? Read full book review >
THIRST FOR POWER by Michael E. Webber
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 26, 2016

"A wide-ranging, nuanced view of difficult but important issues that require serious consideration at every level, from policymakers, opinion shapers, and educators down to everyday citizens."
An exploration of the link between impending global water and power shortages. Read full book review >
THE JAZZ OF PHYSICS by Stephon Alexander
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 26, 2016

"A physics-for-poets guide that's more exuberant than enlightening."
Look to jazz greats like John Coltrane for insights into subatomic particles and the history of the cosmos. Read full book review >
ARE WE SMART ENOUGH TO KNOW HOW SMART ANIMALS ARE? by Frans de Waal
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 25, 2016

"After this edifying book, a trip to the zoo may never be the same."
Intrigued by the search for intelligent life? No need for space travel—it's happening right here on Earth, and the results are amazing. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 19, 2016

"A readable book sure to charm and thrill anyone interested in space exploration."
Renowned geologist and lunar scientist Spudis (Blogging the Moon, 2011, etc.) makes a compelling argument that the moon's many available resources may jump-start mankind's pursuit of space travel.Read full book review >
ALGORITHMS TO LIVE BY by Brian Christian
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 19, 2016

"An entertaining, intelligently presented book for the numerate and computer literate."
We are always connected: this is both our blessing and our curse. The problem "is that we're always buffered," just a step behind the flood of information flowing toward and past us, all the books and movies and other ingredients of what the authors call "bufferbloat."Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"For space aficionados especially but also a good choice for general readers seeking an introduction to an underappreciated, thrilling chapter in aerospace history."
An aviation historian revisits the conception, development, and inaugural flight of "the last American flying machine built to fly higher and faster than everything that had come before." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >