Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 3)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 10, 2015

"A thoughtful yet obscure Cassandra warning of great vulnerabilities disguised as gifts."
Ambitious yet dry treatise regarding a particular terror of modern life: the increasing ubiquity of potential harm spawned by technological transformations. Read full book review >
THE AGE OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT by Jeffrey D. Sachs
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 10, 2015

"Required reading for policymakers and students, and general readers will finish the book realizing they actually understand what sustainable development is all about."
A leading economist offers a brilliant analysis of the worldwide need to balance economic development and environmental sustainability. Read full book review >

LESS MEDICINE, MORE HEALTH by H. Gilbert Welch
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 3, 2015

"Welch's engaging style and touches of humor make this an easy read, and the facts he presents make a convincing case."
A bright, lively discussion of the excesses of medical care to which patients often unwittingly go due to certain false assumptions. Read full book review >
THE END OF COLLEGE by Kevin Carey
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 3, 2015

"The author, a true believer, does not spend much time on counterarguments and outlines a future that some will find exhilarating, others depressing."
Carey, who directs the Education Policy Program at the New America Foundation, a Washington, D.C., think tank, discusses his belief that the computer and the cloud are the future of higher education. Read full book review >
DATA AND GOLIATH by Bruce Schneier
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 2, 2015

"An accessible, detailed look at a disturbing aspect of contemporary life."
A jeremiad suggesting our addiction to data may have made privacy obsolete. Read full book review >

CLIMATE SHOCK by Gernot Wagner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2015

"Specialized and a touch rarified but useful for policy workers in helping shape dollars-and-cents arguments about the environment and global climate."
"Most everything we know tells us climate change is bad. Most everything we don't know tells us it's probably much worse." So observe Environmental Defense Fund economist Wagner (But Will the Planet Notice?: How Smart Economics Can Save the World, 2011, etc.) and Weitzman (Economics/Harvard Univ.; Income, Wealth, and the Maximum Principle, 2003, etc.) in this dismal-science look at a very dismal subject indeed.Read full book review >
VITAMANIA by Catherine Price
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Though Price doesn't provide much new information, the reading is easy and the message is clear and significant."
A catchy title that captures our obsession with vitamins and our belief that getting plenty of them will ensure our good health. Read full book review >
P53 by Sue Armstrong
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A well-written examination of the complex world of scientific research, focusing on a specific gene in the human body."
The scientific history of the gene that regulates cancer in humans. Read full book review >
AIDS BETWEEN SCIENCE AND POLITICS by Peter Piot
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Somewhat arid, as medical policy works tend to be, but of considerable use to readers with an interest in public health issues."
Adaption of a lecture series at the Collège de France by Piot (No Time to Lose: A Life in Pursuit of Deadly Viruses, 2012, etc.), the founding executive director of the Joint U.N. Programme on HIV/AIDS.Read full book review >
THE INTERSTELLAR AGE by Jim Bell
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Uninterested in sending men into space (China is the only nation with an ongoing manned program), Congress remains willing to finance unmanned projects with strictly scientific objectives. These have yielded rich rewards, and Bell delivers an exuberant account of one of the most rewarding."
An expensive, taxpayer-financed project designed by committee and employing thousands of government workers turned out beautifully. This was the first of many miracles of the Voyager mission, two space probes that conducted one of the greatest scientific explorations of the 20th century. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A vital piece of work that demands attention."
Truthdig Editor-in-Chief Scheer (Communication and Journalism/Univ. of Southern California; The Great American Stickup: How Reagan Republicans and Clinton Democrats Enriched Wall Street While Mugging Main Street, 2010, etc.) examines how online convenience has supplanted bedrock American values of personal freedom and the right to privacy.Read full book review >
THE UTOPIA OF RULES by David Graeber
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A sharp, oddly sympathetic and highly readable account of how big government works—or doesn't work, depending on your point of view."
Hate bureaucrats? Then stop supporting violent states. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Mona Eltahawy
April 28, 2015

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book. View video >