Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 3)

EARTH IN HUMAN HANDS by David Grinspoon
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A scattershot approach to an admittedly diffuse set of problems but of broad interest and with a refreshing chaser of optimism."
Another dispatch from the Anthropocene, the geological age in which humans dominate at the expense of all other lifeforms. Read full book review >
HOW TO SURVIVE A PLAGUE by David France
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"A lucid, urgent updating of Randy Shilts' And the Band Played On (1987) and a fine work of social history."
How scientists and citizens banded together to lift the death sentence from AIDS. Read full book review >

DANGEROUS YEARS by David Orr
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"A well-meaning but diffident treatise. Read Lewis Dartnell's The Knowledge (2014) for a more useful take on what comes next."
Farewell, beloved planet. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"Required reading for a generation that's 'going to be asked to dance in a hurricane.'"
The celebrated New York Times columnist diagnoses this unprecedented historical moment and suggests strategies for "resilience and propulsion" that will help us adapt. Read full book review >
THE UNNATURAL WORLD by David Biello
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"In this well-written, significant book, Biello insists that humans, the world's most successful invasive species, have the ability to engage in planetary protection and human survival, but it will require wisdom, innovation, and restraint."
In his first book, Scientific American editor Biello argues that it is not a lack of money or technology that prevents our addressing environmental and societal ills but rather a lack of motivation. Read full book review >

BEYOND EARTH by Charles Wohlforth
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A welcome contribution to the ongoing discussion of the future of America's space program."
An assessment of the prospects for establishing a future space colony. Read full book review >
A MOST IMPROBABLE JOURNEY by Walter Alvarez
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"The science is impeccable, the history a tad simplistic. An Ascent of Man-like approach to the subject of Big History would be most welcome, but this isn't quite it."
Count yourself lucky that you live on a planet with gravity—and silicon. Read full book review >
RETHINK by Steven Poole
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"There's not much that's new here, but that's the point. A modest, enjoyable look at the care and feeding of creativity."
When seeking inspiration, Guardian columnist Poole (Unspeak: How Words Become Weapons, How Weapons Become a Message, and How that Message Becomes Reality, 2006, etc.) writes, it's not a bad idea to sift through the junk pile for second thoughts. Read full book review >
MIND by Daniel J. Siegel
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"If you embrace the notion that humankind ought to embrace more kindness, 'a natural outcome of integration,' then this is your book."
A clinical professor of psychology serves up the soft, squishy side of neuroscience.Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"An original, authentic take on the fissures developing behind North Korea's totalitarian facade."
A crisp, dramatic examination of how technology and human ingenuity are undermining North Korea's secretive dictatorship. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"There's not much new here apart from some synthesis of current theories about meme proliferation and networking, but the book should interest cyberspace completists."
A manifesto of sorts, proclaiming that the ubiquity of social media is not necessarily the end of the world, Luddites notwithstanding, even if those media need to be cajoled "into a healthier state." Read full book review >
REVELATION THROUGH SCIENCE by James G. Martin
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 9, 2016

"A philosophically challenging but accessible argument for comity between reason and faith."
A sweepingly thorough account of the ways in which modern science and religion share common ground. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >