Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 3)

VIRTUAL UNREALITY by Charles Seife
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 30, 2014

"Readers of this disturbing but entirely convincing account need to remind themselves that the Internet is pretty useful, but they will not deny that it teems with garbage."
An ingenious overview of a wildly unreliable Internet. Read full book review >
PROOF by Adam Rogers
FOOD & COOKING
Released: June 3, 2014

"Rogers gives booze a thorough going over, complete with good cheer, highbrow humor and smarts."
From the action of the yeast to the blear of the hangover, via the witchery of fermentation, distillation and aging, Wired articles editor Rogers takes readers on a splendid tour of the booze-making process. Read full book review >

STRUCK BY GENIUS by Jason Padgett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 22, 2014

"An exquisite insider's look into the mysteries of consciousness."
When Padgett suffered a traumatic brain injury after a violent mugging, his sense of perception was profoundly altered. Overnight, his life as a fun-loving salesman changed into one dominated by unprompted geometric visualizations and the unexpected insights of newfound mathematical brilliance. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 8, 2014

"A fast-paced history of the singular idea that shaped a multitude of modern achievements."
In the mid-17th century, debate raged over a mathematical concept of the infinitely small—and nothing less than modernity as we know it was at stake. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: April 1, 2014

"'The mind remains, to a tantalizing degree, a realm of secrets and wonder,' writes the author, and so, too, does the world around us, which he entertainingly scours for the possibility of crucial anomalies."
A cerebral ride into the world of the unorthodox. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 25, 2014

"An engaging history that raises provocative questions about the future of nuclear science."
Nelson (Rocket Men: The Epic Story of the First Men on the Moon, 2009, etc.) returns with a survey of mankind's use of radioactive materials. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 12, 2014

"The most comprehensive and certainly one of the most entertaining accounts of atomic accidents."
Having delivered a delightfully astute history of atomic power in Atomic Awakening (2009), nuclear engineer Mahaffey goes over the same ground with the same combination of expertise and wit, this time describing what happens when things go wrong. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 11, 2014

"A lively account of the men and their times and a brilliant exposition of the scientific circumstances and significance of their work."
Forbes (Imitation of Life: How Biology Is Inspiring Computing, 2004, etc.) and Mahon (Oliver Heaviside: Maverick Mastermind of Electricity, 2009, etc.) offer a compelling new interpretation of the seminal importance of the discoveries of Michael Faraday (1791-1861) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879). Read full book review >
ON THE CANCER FRONTIER by Paul A. Marks
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 11, 2014

"On a level with Lewis Thomas for its clarity and verve in presenting the science of the cell and the ability of cancer to assume multiple guises."
Former Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center president and CEO Marks delivers a panoramic view of developments in cancer research and treatment over the last 40 years, from both the researchers' and administrators' perspectives. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 4, 2014

"Goldstein's bright, ingenious philosophical romp makes Plato not only relevant to our times, but palpably alive."
Plato returns to 21st-century America in this witty, inventive, genre-bending work by MacArthur Fellow Goldstein (36 Arguments for the Existence of God: A Work of Fiction, 2010, etc.). Read full book review >
MINDLESS by Simon Head
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 11, 2014

"A sobering, important book."
A dark, revealing view of computerized control and monitoring of the workplace. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 11, 2014

"A highly significant eye-opener rich in facts and enjoyment."
New Yorker staff writer Kolbert (Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change, 2006, etc.) returns with a deft examination of the startling losses of the sixth mass extinction occurring at this moment and the sobering, underlying cause: humans. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >