Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 4)

VISUAL INTELLIGENCE by Amy E. Herman
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: May 3, 2016

"Sharp and original, this book should alter how readers look at the world."
A comprehensive guide to seeing what others do not, distilled from art historian Herman's acclaimed seminar The Art of Perception. Read full book review >
TRACK CHANGES by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 2, 2016

"Materiality, information, and absence: as Kirschenbaum rightly notes, literature is 'different after word processing,' and so is literary history. He makes a solid start in showing how."
A learned and lively study of the sometimes-uneasy fit between writing on a computer and writing generally. Read full book review >

THE GREAT ACCELERATION by Robert Colvile
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2016

"A familiar argument but with interesting twists and a rosier forecast than many other books of social/technological criticism."
A well-paced consideration of the effects of technology on lives made ever busier by it—and whipping by in a whirlwind as a result. Read full book review >
SORTING THE BEEF FROM THE BULL by Richard Evershed
FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 26, 2016

"Not pleasant reading for the faint of stomach, but a valuable guide for serious, conscientious shoppers."
A disturbing look at how unscrupulous entrepreneurs can tamper with our food supply. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 26, 2016

"Williams delivers a complex tale about a complex disease, and by sharing a narrative rich in detail, personalities, and New York scenes, she will ease the burdens of those immediately affected and inform others of progress in cancer research."
Who would have thought a book about being diagnosed with stage 4 melanoma could be exhilarating and entertaining? Read full book review >

THIRST FOR POWER by Michael E. Webber
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 26, 2016

"A wide-ranging, nuanced view of difficult but important issues that require serious consideration at every level, from policymakers, opinion shapers, and educators down to everyday citizens."
An exploration of the link between impending global water and power shortages. Read full book review >
THE JAZZ OF PHYSICS by Stephon Alexander
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 26, 2016

"A physics-for-poets guide that's more exuberant than enlightening."
Look to jazz greats like John Coltrane for insights into subatomic particles and the history of the cosmos. Read full book review >
ARE WE SMART ENOUGH TO KNOW HOW SMART ANIMALS ARE? by Frans de Waal
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 25, 2016

"After this edifying book, a trip to the zoo may never be the same."
Intrigued by the search for intelligent life? No need for space travel—it's happening right here on Earth, and the results are amazing. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 19, 2016

"A readable book sure to charm and thrill anyone interested in space exploration."
Renowned geologist and lunar scientist Spudis (Blogging the Moon, 2011, etc.) makes a compelling argument that the moon's many available resources may jump-start mankind's pursuit of space travel.Read full book review >
ALGORITHMS TO LIVE BY by Brian Christian
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 19, 2016

"An entertaining, intelligently presented book for the numerate and computer literate."
We are always connected: this is both our blessing and our curse. The problem "is that we're always buffered," just a step behind the flood of information flowing toward and past us, all the books and movies and other ingredients of what the authors call "bufferbloat."Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"For space aficionados especially but also a good choice for general readers seeking an introduction to an underappreciated, thrilling chapter in aerospace history."
An aviation historian revisits the conception, development, and inaugural flight of "the last American flying machine built to fly higher and faster than everything that had come before." Read full book review >
Meat Climate Change by Moses Seenarine
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 15, 2016

"An impassioned, thorough look at meat's role in climate change that presents valid arguments for changing policy and behavior, but in a way that's unlikely to sway new converts."
An argument for combating climate change through modifying agricultural practices and eating habits. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >