Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 4)

Released: Aug. 5, 2014

"In this cool, disarming and persuasive indictment of fracking's widespread negative consequences, the authors provide an important addition to an ongoing debate."
A primer on unconventional fossil fuel extraction, with convincing evidence as to its deleterious nature, from veterinarian Bamberger and Oswald (Molecular Medicine/Cornell Univ.). Read full book review >
Released: July 15, 2014

"Essential for aspiring entrepreneurs, to say nothing of those looking for a view of how the modern, speed-of-light world came to be."
Richly detailed, swiftly moving work of modern business history, recounting a truly world-changing technology and the people who made it possible. Read full book review >

Released: July 8, 2014

"A delightful, detailed chronicle of great men (and a rare woman) whose fascination with the night sky and the technology necessary to study it led to today's dramatic discoveries."
Photography, not computers, ushered in modern astronomy. Here, its bumpy evolution is in the expert hands of Harvard College Observatory associate Hirshfeld (Physics/Univ. of Mass. Dartmouth; Eureka Man: The Life and Legacy of Archimedes, 2009, etc.). Read full book review >
Released: July 3, 2014

"'We are too easily seduced by explanations for the inexplicable,' writes the author in this amusing, informative account of how many arguments are backed by meaningless statistics."
Another in the genre that began with the Darrell Huff's 1954 best-seller, How to Lie with Statistics. If history is any guide, it will likely be ignored by those who do the lying. Read full book review >
Released: June 30, 2014

"Readers of this disturbing but entirely convincing account need to remind themselves that the Internet is pretty useful, but they will not deny that it teems with garbage."
An ingenious overview of a wildly unreliable Internet. Read full book review >

PROOF by Adam Rogers
Released: June 3, 2014

"Rogers gives booze a thorough going over, complete with good cheer, highbrow humor and smarts."
From the action of the yeast to the blear of the hangover, via the witchery of fermentation, distillation and aging, Wired articles editor Rogers takes readers on a splendid tour of the booze-making process. Read full book review >
STRUCK BY GENIUS by Jason Padgett
Released: April 22, 2014

"An exquisite insider's look into the mysteries of consciousness."
When Padgett suffered a traumatic brain injury after a violent mugging, his sense of perception was profoundly altered. Overnight, his life as a fun-loving salesman changed into one dominated by unprompted geometric visualizations and the unexpected insights of newfound mathematical brilliance. Read full book review >
Released: April 8, 2014

"A fast-paced history of the singular idea that shaped a multitude of modern achievements."
In the mid-17th century, debate raged over a mathematical concept of the infinitely small—and nothing less than modernity as we know it was at stake. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 2014

"'The mind remains, to a tantalizing degree, a realm of secrets and wonder,' writes the author, and so, too, does the world around us, which he entertainingly scours for the possibility of crucial anomalies."
A cerebral ride into the world of the unorthodox. Read full book review >
Released: March 25, 2014

"An engaging history that raises provocative questions about the future of nuclear science."
Nelson (Rocket Men: The Epic Story of the First Men on the Moon, 2009, etc.) returns with a survey of mankind's use of radioactive materials. Read full book review >
Released: March 12, 2014

"The most comprehensive and certainly one of the most entertaining accounts of atomic accidents."
Having delivered a delightfully astute history of atomic power in Atomic Awakening (2009), nuclear engineer Mahaffey goes over the same ground with the same combination of expertise and wit, this time describing what happens when things go wrong. Read full book review >
Released: March 11, 2014

"A lively account of the men and their times and a brilliant exposition of the scientific circumstances and significance of their work."
Forbes (Imitation of Life: How Biology Is Inspiring Computing, 2004, etc.) and Mahon (Oliver Heaviside: Maverick Mastermind of Electricity, 2009, etc.) offer a compelling new interpretation of the seminal importance of the discoveries of Michael Faraday (1791-1861) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Marie Lu
September 29, 2015

In the second installment of Marie Lu’s Young Elites series, The Rose Society, Adelina Amouteru’s heart has suffered at the hands of both family and friends, turning her down the bitter path of revenge. Now known and feared as the White Wolf, she and her sister flee Kenettra to find other Young Elites in the hopes of building her own army of allies. Her goal: to strike down the Inquisition Axis, the white-cloaked soldiers who nearly killed her. But Adelina is no heroine. Her powers, fed only by fear and hate, have started to grow beyond her control. She does not trust her newfound Elite friends. Teren Santoro, leader of the Inquisition, wants her dead. And her former friends, Raffaele and the Dagger Society, want to stop her thirst for vengeance. Adelina struggles to cling to the good within her. But how can someone be good, when her very existence depends on darkness? “The direction of this trilogy's conclusion is left refreshingly difficult to predict,” our reviewer writes. View video >