Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 5)

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 20, 2016

"A sharp contribution to a significant topic that continues to generate heated discussion and debate."
A tour d'horizon of the historical relationship among race, racism, and mental illness. Read full book review >
RATIONING EARTH by Herb Bentz
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 12, 2016

"An original take on the economics of resource conservation."
A radical, ecologically minded proposal to meet the future challenges of an increasingly productive but still unsustainable economy. Read full book review >

THE WOOD FOR THE TREES by Richard Fortey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 7, 2016

"An eloquent, eccentric, and precise nature memoir."
A distinguished British paleontologist offers a meticulously compiled "biography" of four acres of woodland in Oxfordshire, England. Read full book review >
THE SIGNALS ARE TALKING by Amy Webb
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"Webb provides a logical way to sift through today's onslaught of events and information to spot coming changes in your corner of the world."
How to forecast emerging technological tends. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A welcome and engaging work that does honor to Sobel's subjects."
Popular science writer Sobel (And the Sun Stood Still, 2016, etc.) continues her project of heralding the many contributions of women to science. Read full book review >

WHIPLASH by Joi Ito
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"This exhilarating and authoritative book actually makes sense of our incredibly fast-paced, high-tech society. A standout among titles on technology and innovation, it will repay reading—and rereading—by leaders in all fields."
Two cybergurus offer a "user's manual to the twenty-first century." Read full book review >
ARE NUMBERS REAL? by Brian Clegg
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"Solid as a straightforward chronology of how mathematics has developed over time, and the author adds a provocative note urging scientists to keep it in its place."
The emphasis is on "real" in the latest by the prolific British science writer, who questions the extent to which mathematics truly reflects the workings of nature. Read full book review >
EARTH IN HUMAN HANDS by David Grinspoon
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A scattershot approach to an admittedly diffuse set of problems but of broad interest and with a refreshing chaser of optimism."
Another dispatch from the Anthropocene, the geological age in which humans dominate at the expense of all other lifeforms. Read full book review >
HOW TO SURVIVE A PLAGUE by David France
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 29, 2016

"A lucid, urgent updating of Randy Shilts' And the Band Played On (1987) and a fine work of social history."
How scientists and citizens banded together to lift the death sentence from AIDS. Read full book review >
DANGEROUS YEARS by David Orr
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"A well-meaning but diffident treatise. Read Lewis Dartnell's The Knowledge (2014) for a more useful take on what comes next."
Farewell, beloved planet. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"Required reading for a generation that's 'going to be asked to dance in a hurricane.'"
The celebrated New York Times columnist diagnoses this unprecedented historical moment and suggests strategies for "resilience and propulsion" that will help us adapt. Read full book review >
THE UNNATURAL WORLD by David Biello
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"In this well-written, significant book, Biello insists that humans, the world's most successful invasive species, have the ability to engage in planetary protection and human survival, but it will require wisdom, innovation, and restraint."
In his first book, Scientific American editor Biello argues that it is not a lack of money or technology that prevents our addressing environmental and societal ills but rather a lack of motivation. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >