Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 6)

BEYOND EARTH by Charles Wohlforth
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A welcome contribution to the ongoing discussion of the future of America's space program."
An assessment of the prospects for establishing a future space colony. Read full book review >
A MOST IMPROBABLE JOURNEY by Walter Alvarez
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"The science is impeccable, the history a tad simplistic. An Ascent of Man-like approach to the subject of Big History would be most welcome, but this isn't quite it."
Count yourself lucky that you live on a planet with gravity—and silicon. Read full book review >

RETHINK by Steven Poole
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"There's not much that's new here, but that's the point. A modest, enjoyable look at the care and feeding of creativity."
When seeking inspiration, Guardian columnist Poole (Unspeak: How Words Become Weapons, How Weapons Become a Message, and How that Message Becomes Reality, 2006, etc.) writes, it's not a bad idea to sift through the junk pile for second thoughts. Read full book review >
MIND by Daniel J. Siegel
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"If you embrace the notion that humankind ought to embrace more kindness, 'a natural outcome of integration,' then this is your book."
A clinical professor of psychology serves up the soft, squishy side of neuroscience.Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"An original, authentic take on the fissures developing behind North Korea's totalitarian facade."
A crisp, dramatic examination of how technology and human ingenuity are undermining North Korea's secretive dictatorship. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"There's not much new here apart from some synthesis of current theories about meme proliferation and networking, but the book should interest cyberspace completists."
A manifesto of sorts, proclaiming that the ubiquity of social media is not necessarily the end of the world, Luddites notwithstanding, even if those media need to be cajoled "into a healthier state." Read full book review >
REVELATION THROUGH SCIENCE by James G. Martin
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 9, 2016

"A philosophically challenging but accessible argument for comity between reason and faith."
A sweepingly thorough account of the ways in which modern science and religion share common ground. Read full book review >
A SPACE TRAVELER'S GUIDE TO THE SOLAR SYSTEM by Mark Thompson
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"Thompson is a knowledgeable and capable guide, but his many fans may prefer to stick to his TV shows."
The popular host of the BBC's award-winning Stargazing Live takes readers on an imaginary journey throughout our solar system. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"An eye-opening exploration of the intersection between philosophy and science and a fascinating peek into our innermost selves."
The human mind is capable of astonishing feats, but does it hold the power to alleviate pain, or even cure disease, simply through suggestibility? Read full book review >
THE REVENGE OF ANALOG by David Sax
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"A perky and well-illustrated but repetitive, sometimes-pat look at a discordantly retro cultural trend."
An exploration of millennial fondness for old technologies and its implications for a competitive business landscape. Read full book review >
GOLDILOCKS AND THE WATER BEARS by Louisa Preston
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"A solid, absorbing background to what makes life possible."
An astrobiologist and planetary geologist delineates the development of life on Earth and then makes the leap into "life" elsewhere in the heavens. Read full book review >
Practical Ophthalmology by James Hung
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 2, 2016

"An indispensable ophthalmological volume for any general practitioner's office."
Hung (Silk Road on My Mind, 2015, etc.) offers an ophthalmology guide intended for use by nonspecialist medical practitioners.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >