Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 7)

TALES FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BRAIN by Michael S. Gazzaniga
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A lively appreciation of both the complexity of the human mind and the scientific enterprise."
"How on earth does the brain enable mind?" That is the still-to-be-answered question posed by Gazzaniga (Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain, 2011, etc.), the director of the SAGE Center for the Study of Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara.Read full book review >
HALF-LIFE by Frank Close
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A fine account, heavy on science and politics, of a long, productive, peripatetic and ultimately inexplicable life."
Months after the 1950 arrest of British nuclear physicist Klaus Fuchs, Bruno Pontecorvo (1913-1993) vanished behind the Iron Curtain. Everyone assumed that he was also a Soviet spy, but extensive investigation found no evidence that he provided secrets to the Soviets. Read full book review >

THE MAN WHO TOUCHED HIS OWN HEART by Rob Dunn
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"Credit Dunn with a valuable text that offers something for everyone—patients, practitioners, medical students, historians and policymakers."
The heart was a black box up until a century ago, writes Dunn (Ecology and Evolution/North Carolina State Univ.; The Wild Life on Our Bodies, 2011, etc.). His well-researched text chronicles how the box was opened.Read full book review >
BOLD by Peter H. Diamandis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"An empowering and multifaceted 'playbook' for the creative entrepreneur."
How rapid-fire technology is equipping startup entrepreneurs with the tools required to create popular and profitable business models. Read full book review >
TOUCH by David J. Linden
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"So surpassing does Linden make touch seem that even turning the pages of his book becomes a pleasurable experience."
A crisp reminder that the sense of touch is not to be taken lightly. Read full book review >

WORDS ONSCREEN by Naomi S. Baron
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"A clear call for common sense and reason that will likely fall on ears covered with headphones."
A darkling view of what our world—and what we—will be like if codex reading eventually surrenders to the flickering screens of e-readers.Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 28, 2015

"A genuinely original position on a historically significant cultural issue."
A scientifically rigorous and philosophically challenging argument that digital media is not merely shaping culture, but also the very nature of the human brain. Read full book review >
MIND CHANGE by Susan Greenfield
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 27, 2015

"Challenging, stimulating perspective from an informed neuroscientist on a complex, fast-moving, hugely consequential field."
A comprehensive overview of the scientific research—albeit in its infancy—into the effects of cybertechnology on our brains. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 27, 2015

"A lively, anecdotal account of potential new directions that may point the way to major therapeutic breakthroughs."
Doidge (Psychiatry/Univ. of Toronto; The Brain that Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science, 2007) reports on continuing advances in our understanding of the human brain and its unique way of healing.Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 16, 2015

"Wide-ranging, informative and entertaining, especially for parents and educators."
How our bodies and minds work in tandem. Read full book review >
TASTY by John McQuaid
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"McQuaid is an enthusiastic writer undisturbed by dead ends, and he provides an entertaining exploration of 'the mystery at the heart of flavor,' which 'has never truly been cracked.'"
"Pleasure is never very far from aversion; this is a feature of our anatomy and behavior. In the brain, the two closely overlap." So writes Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist McQuaid (Path of Destruction: The Devastation of New Orleans and the Coming Age of Superstorms, 2006, etc.) in this provocative investigatory foray into the nature of taste.Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"More at home in college classrooms than on parents' nightstands."
This book competently covers the details of adolescent brain development but offers few surprises and scant advice. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >