Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 7)

YOUR ATOMIC SELF by Curt Stager
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A wondrous exploration of how our interconnections are vast and abiding, past, present and future."
An "atomic field guide to yourself" and your surroundings. Read full book review >
ADA'S ALGORITHM by James Essinger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A robust, engaging and exciting biography."
The story of Ada Lovelace (1815-1852), the brilliant mathematician and the daughter of the poet Lord Byron, who likely wrote the first computer program in the early 1840s. Due to her gender, however, her research was overlooked, and another two centuries passed before computers became a reality. Read full book review >

DRUGS UNLIMITED by Mike Power
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A compelling, accessible perspective on the global e-tail drug market."
A comprehensive report on how the Internet has revolutionized illicit narcotic sales. Read full book review >
THE BIRTH OF THE PILL by Jonathan Eig
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 13, 2014

"A well-paced, page-turning popular history featuring a lively, character-driven blend of scientific discovery and gender politics."
Former Wall Street Journal reporter Eig (Get Capone: The Secret Plot that Captured America's Most Wanted Gangster, 2010, etc.) recounts the origin story of the oral contraceptive—"the pill"—as a scientific answer to a cultural conundrum: how to have sex without pregnancy. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 13, 2014

"Always entertaining and meticulously composed, this book will reorient your relationship with the quantum."
A history of some of the most "forceful, imaginative, and insightful" minds in quantum theory and how the world became entranced by their scientific language. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 9, 2014

"A lively, informative mix of genealogy and genetics."
A soup-to-nuts look at how we can use the tools of genealogy, family stories, cultural history and genetics to gain insight into our own lives and the world in which we live. Read full book review >
BEING MORTAL by Atul Gawande
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A sensitive, intelligent and heartfelt examination of the processes of aging and dying."
A prominent surgeon and journalist takes a cleareyed look at aging and death in 21st-century America. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A well-researched, lively entry into the current debate about the role of science in a democracy."
Shachtman (American Iconoclast: The Life and Times of Eric Hoffer, 2011, etc.) makes a strong case for the importance of science and technology in the creation of the United States. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"Isaacson weaves prodigious research and deftly crafted anecdotes into a vigorous, gripping narrative about the visionaries whose imaginations and zeal continue to transform our lives."
A panoramic history of technological revolution. Read full book review >
LEONARDO'S BRAIN by Leonard Shlain
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"Shlain admits that he is taking an extreme position, but many readers will forgive him because he has written an entertaining mixture of facts and speculation on one of history's immortals."
An enthusiastic mixture of history, neuroscience and pop psychology that aims to explain the brilliance of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519). Read full book review >
LEVOLUTION by Michael Gunter
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"Provocative and hard to put down, but only for the science savvy."
A new theory of how energy sculpts order throughout the universe. Read full book review >
THE MEANING OF HUMAN EXISTENCE by Edward O. Wilson
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 6, 2014

"A little book with a big message, bound to produce discussion among scientists and discomfort in devout churchgoers."
An exploration of what it means to be human by the noted sociobiologist and naturalist, twice the winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >