Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 9)

THE LUCKY YEARS by David B. Agus
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Practical health information fortified with exciting news from the forefront of modern medical technology."
A pioneering oncologist explores the latest advancements in general medicine. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"A well-rounded discussion of common mental problems and strategies for dealing with them."
The chief psychiatrist at Amen Clinics offers a holistic approach to treating an array of mental disorders. Read full book review >

HOME by John S. Allen
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"Excellent supplementary reading for a variety of college courses, but the book's scope and accessibility make this one for general readers, too."
A neuroanthropologist tackles the questions of how home came to be a central feature of human life and what we mean when we say that we feel at home. Read full book review >
 Transformative Enterprise Architecture  by Atul Apte
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 24, 2015

"A searching look into the evolving world of IT enterprises, despite unfortunately hyper-technical language.
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An attempt to prepare organizations for a new business culture of rapid change. Read full book review >
THE DAWNING MOON OF THE MIND by Susan Brind Morrow
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"An erudite investigation that rewards patient, careful reading."
Ancient Egyptian philosophy revealed in a hieroglyphic text. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"An overly speculative but sympathetic look at Huxley's cadre of determined investigators probing the mind."
Symons (Communications and Media Studies/Santa Ana Coll.; Nostradamus, Vagabond Prophet, 2011, etc.) explores Aldous Huxley's quest to expand consciousness.Read full book review >
THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT WHAT'S BAD FOR YOU...THE BAD NEWS ABOUT WHAT'S GOOD FOR YOU by Jeff Wilser
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"Wilser delivers useful advice with cheerful good humor in a book that is wide-ranging but holds few surprises."
A humorous anthology debunking contemporary wisdom about guilty pleasures and bad habits. Read full book review >
TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING by Lee Goldman
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"Part I gets kudos for being informative and accessible, but the presumptions of Part II make for a controversial conclusion."
A renowned cardiologist explores the paradox that traits essential to human survival in prehistoric times are today the cause of countless human deaths. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"Engrossing techno-science delivered with gusto and sure to reach a varied audience."
A veteran science reporter examines the many innovative developments of human sensory enhancement. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"A superbly lucid examination of a dramatic revolution in human thought that deserves a place on the shelf with Thomas Kuhn and David Deutsch."
Not exactly a history of science but of our idea of science: a shrewd, thoughtful analysis of how our view of finding truth held steady throughout history and then, over a century, changed and produced the dazzling progress we often take for granted.Read full book review >
TEN BILLION TOMORROWS by Brian Clegg
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"Satisfying soul food for your inner geek: an enjoyable tour of science fact and fiction by a writer who obviously revels in both."
Space travel. Time travel. Travels in other dimensions. Microwaves. Whatever smacks of the future is the product of science—but imagined by science fiction first. Read full book review >
A BRIEF HISTORY OF CREATION by Bill Mesler
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Dec. 7, 2015

"A lively, highly readable jaunt through the world of science."
Changing ideas of how life appeared on Earth, a mystery that remains unsolved. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >