Science & Technology Book Reviews

HOMO DEUS by Yuval Noah Harari
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A relentlessly fascinating book that is sure to become—and deserves to be—a bestseller."
In an intellectually provocative follow-up to Sapiens (2015), Harari (History/Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem) looks to the future. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A fine biography of a man who played an essential role in post-World War II American science and deserves to be better known."
The life and work of "an expert in technology" who is largely forgotten outside the world of physics. Read full book review >

CONVERGENCE by Peter Watson
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Those who reject the idea of convergence outright may not get far in this book, but readers with no objection to a sweeping, entirely fascinating history of science during the last 200 years will find an abundance of enlightening material."
The journalist and polymath delivers a delightful exploration of "the deepest idea in the universe." Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A quick and instructive read for readers with a casual interest in this quickly changing company as well as those fascinated by the fates of startups."
A fast-moving, well-researched account of the founding and surprising growth of home-sharing company Airbnb. Read full book review >
THE VACCINE RACE by Meredith Wadman
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An important story well told, featuring the drama and characters needed to make this a candidate for film adaptation."
A dramatic medical history that reveals the progress and the stumbles, the personalities and the rivalries, in the race to find a vaccine for rubella, or German measles. Read full book review >

THE BOOK THAT CHANGED AMERICA by Randall Fuller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A fresh, invigorating history of philosophical and political struggles."
A vibrant history of the reception of Charles Darwin's ideas by American minds and spirits. Read full book review >
TESTOSTERONE REX by Cordelia Fine
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A fascinating, greatly contemplative discussion of sex and gender and the embedded societal expectations of both."
A cerebral assessment of gender, society, and sexuality. Read full book review >
FOOD FIGHT by McKay Jenkins
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Impressive research into a complex situation presented in a highly readable form."
There are no easy answers to questions about genetically modified foods, but environmental journalist Jenkins lays out the promise and the peril of the contemporary industrialization of food production. Read full book review >
ATTENDING by Ronald Epstein
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Worthy reading for medical students and practitioners but also applicable to other fields: artists, writers, musicians, teachers et al. can also fall into formulaic ruts and autopilot behavior and need literally to change their minds."
Can the encounter between doctor and patient be improved? A renowned family physician thinks so, and he explains how in this compendium of a lifetime of experience. Read full book review >
WHY TIME FLIES by Alan Burdick
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A highly illuminating intellectual investigation."
An insightful meditation on the curious nature of time by New Yorker staff writer Burdick (Out of Eden: An Odyssey of Ecological Invasion, 2006). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"Valuable reading for shoppers and retailers alike."
Blame it on the smartphone, the technology that is bringing internetlike tracking and surveillance into brick-and-mortar stores. Read full book review >
#ESOCIETY by David Barker
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 12, 2017

"A disturbing, affecting, and unforgettable work that remains upbeat while asking difficult questions about society."
A self-made British internet entrepreneur leaves a comfortable life to discover why so many people remain trapped in poverty and unemployment in this debut autobiography and manifesto. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >