Science & Technology Book Reviews

BEST BEFORE by Nicola Temple
Released: April 24, 2018

"Despite the book's decidedly British flavor, its subject, food, is universal, and so should be its appeal."
A thoroughly researched, well-written account that attempts to remove the stigma from the term "processed food." Read full book review >
ARMY OF NONE by Paul Scharre
Released: April 24, 2018

"A clear, well-written, and richly documented discussion of an issue that deserves deep and careful study."
Former Army Ranger Scharre, the director of the Future of War Initiative at the Center for a New American Security, looks at the technical, strategic, and ethical questions raised by autonomous weapons, which are closer to reality than many civilians may realize. Read full book review >

Released: April 24, 2018

"Although diagrams abound, cosmic microwave polarization is a difficult subject, and readers who have forgotten their college physics may struggle. Still, most will enjoy this behind-the-scenes view of the dog-eat-dog world of big science and agree that the Nobel Prize needs fixing."
An astrophysicist provides "an insider's glimpse into the power of the [Nobel] prize to refract reality, as it did for me, an astronomer who was once seemingly about to read the very prologue of the cosmos." Read full book review >
Released: April 24, 2018

"A clearheaded reckoning with consequences of the tech industry's disruptions and the ideology that undergirds it."
An on-the-ground look at Silicon Valley and what its power means for the rest of the world. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 2018

"A fresh rethinking of a crucial process in today's world."
A self-help business book that challenges conventional wisdom about networking. Read full book review >

CHASING HOPE by Richard M. Cohen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2018

"A clear and concise memoir of introspection, though Cohen's journalistic approach may not provide abundant hope for readers."
A longtime multiple sclerosis patient seeks the meaning of hope. Read full book review >
ATLAS OF A LOST WORLD by Craig Childs
Released: May 1, 2018

"A tight weave of professional findings, anecdotes, site visits, and explanations behind ancient artifacts make this book both engaging and indispensable for those with an interest in prehistory."
Scenarios of glacial and postglacial environments in the Americas. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 2018

"The author's offbeat view of human evolution makes for lively reading and invites readers to think deeply about some of his wilder conjectures."
Natural selection made us what we are today, and that is deeply flawed. So argues Lents (Biology/John Jay Coll., CUNY; Not So Different: Finding Human Nature in Animals, 2016) in his second book. Read full book review >
HOW NOT TO BE A DOCTOR by John Launer
Released: May 1, 2018

"Humorous, poignant, provocative, and educational, the author's opinions and anecdotes offer fresh takes on the ever changing field of medicine and how small changes in patient care have the potential to inspire radical improvements in the industry at large."
An assortment of clinical musings from the forefront of patient-centered medicine. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 2018

"A carefully assembled, thorough book that should be required reading for corporate leaders."
Former Secretary of State Rice (Democracy: Stories from the Long Road to Freedom, 2017, etc.) and Zegart (Eyes on Spies: Congress and the United States Intelligence Community, 2011, etc.), both Stanford political scientists, describe how political risk can affect businesses—and what to do about it. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 2018

"A solid work of sports journalism and encouraging reading for jocks who are late to the game but committed to the win all the same."
An exploration of the "elite athletes…who continue to perform and compete at the very highest levels long after the age most of their peers have faded away." Read full book review >
Released: May 3, 2018

"Whether China succeeds is, of course, for the future to tell. That it has emerged so rapidly as the region's superpower, though, makes this brief study particularly timely."
Illuminating study of China's ambitious efforts to extend its influence in Southeast Asia by means of a high-speed rail system. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >