Science & Technology Book Reviews

Fight Like A Physicist by Jason, PhD Thalken
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 7, 2015

"An enlightening book for martial artists seeking a competitive edge."
Thalken explores how physics can be applied to martial arts. Read full book review >
BLACK MAN IN A WHITE COAT by Damon Tweedy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"In this unsparingly honest chronicle, Tweedy cohesively illuminates the experiences of black doctors and black patients and reiterates the need for improved understanding of racial differences within global medical communities."
An arresting memoir that personalizes the enduring racial divide in contemporary American medicine. Read full book review >

THE MAGIC OF MATH by Arthur Benjamin
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Forget magic. Benjamin delivers a primer generously filled with insights and intuitions that make math approachable, interesting, and, yes, beautiful."
An enthusiastic celebration of the beauty of mathematics. Read full book review >
A IS FOR ARSENIC by Kathryn Harkup
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"The addition of real-life cases and comparisons to Christie's works make this a nice little murder mystery of its own. Fear not, she's careful not to spoil the endings of the classic novels."
Chemist Harkup's first book is the product of her passion for the work of Agatha Christie and her broad knowledge and research in the matter of poisons. Read full book review >
BOG BODIES UNCOVERED by Miranda Aldhouse-Green
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"An intriguing window into the past."
A real-life forensic thriller revealing the secrets of ancient and modern bodies preserved in bogs—some for nearly 3,000 years—in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Denmark, and northern Germany. Read full book review >

THIRTY MILLION WORDS by Dana Suskind
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Informative, exciting new data that confirms the significant benefits gained by talking to your child."
New research demonstrating the importance of communicating with your child right from birth. Read full book review >
THE ONLY WOMAN IN THE ROOM by Eileen Pollack
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Hard-hitting, difficult to read, and impossible to put down."
An unvarnished account of what it was like, in the mid-1970s, to be "one of the first two women to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in physics at Yale." Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A fascinating account of extreme efforts to stave off extinction, the ethics of these efforts, and an unsettling, not-terribly-optimistic analysis of their chances of success."
Everyone sympathizes with endangered species, and few object to traditional conservation measures (limits on hunting, habitat preservation) that work—but they don't work if habitats disappear or if numbers dwindle or vanish entirely. Radical measures are necessary, writes journalist O'Connor. Read full book review >
LET THERE BE WATER by Seth M. Siegel
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A major contribution to this hotly debated issue and to broader questions of environmental policy.
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An in-depth report on how Israel has combined technological innovation with conservation to achieve a water surplus at home and become a world leader in water management. Read full book review >
CHILLED by Tom Jackson
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"There's much to wonder at in Jackson's captivating book."
The lively history of refrigeration from British science writer Jackson (Mathematics: An Illustrated History of Numbers, 2012, etc.).Read full book review >
CAR WARS by John J. Fialka
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"An inspiring industrial comeback story infused with possibility."
An update on how the electric car is poised to emerge as the preferred, climate-friendly transportation of the future. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"With wit, vision, and scholarship, Domingos describes how these scientists are creating programs that allow a computer to teach itself. Readers unfamiliar with logic and computer theory will have a difficult time, but those who persist will discover fascinating insights."
Traditionally, the only way to make a computer execute a task is to write precise instructions: an algorithm. As the author notes in this enthusiastic but not dumbed-down introduction to machine learning, it is impossible to "write a program to tell a computer how to drive a car or decipher handwriting, but if we give enough examples to a computer running a learning algorithm, it will figure out how to do it on its own." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >