Science & Technology Book Reviews

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"A welcome, well-conceived contribution to the history of technology."
Creative destruction meets destructive creation in this economic-historical study of the Internet and its privatization. Read full book review >
THE DAWNING MOON OF THE MIND by Susan Brind Morrow
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"An erudite investigation that rewards patient, careful reading."
Ancient Egyptian philosophy revealed in a hieroglyphic text. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"An overly speculative but sympathetic look at Huxley's cadre of determined investigators probing the mind."
Symons (Communications and Media Studies/Santa Ana Coll.; Nostradamus, Vagabond Prophet, 2011, etc.) explores Aldous Huxley's quest to expand consciousness.Read full book review >
WHEN THE SUN BURSTS by Christopher Bollas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"A vastly informative, coherent, and valuable assessment; useful and accessible for both mental health professionals and laypeople—even those who don't share the author's unique perspectives and treatment alternatives."
A contemporary appraisal of schizophrenia and its puzzling traits and treatments through the lens of a physician's esteemed 40-year practice. Read full book review >
Shift by Haydn Shaughnessy
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 12, 2015

"Engages some worthwhile themes, often tangled in dense prose."
A scholarly look at how technology has radically transformed the world of commerce, coupled with advice for how to navigate this new landscape. Read full book review >

Fight Like A Physicist by Jason, PhD Thalken
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 7, 2015

"An enlightening book for martial artists seeking a competitive edge."
Thalken explores how physics can be applied to martial arts. Read full book review >
THE HIDDEN HALF OF NATURE by David R. Montgomery
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 16, 2015

"A must-read for avid gardeners, those interested in bolstering our precarious food supply, or anyone remotely concerned about their health and the soil under their feet."
A geologist and a biologist and environmental planner chronicle the transformation of their desolate Seattle backyard into a fertile garden and how they learned about the importance of beneficial microbes in their newly revived soil. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Another deeply felt entry on two divergent, yet ultimately compatible, ways of engaging the world and understanding reality."
The New Atheists have it all wrong, insists McGrath (Science and Religion/Oxford Univ.; C.S. Lewis—A Life: Eccentric Genius, Reluctant Prophet, 2013, etc.).Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"What does it mean to be human? Henrich's book, a pleasure for the biologically and scientifically inclined, doesn't provide the definitive answer, but it does offer plenty of material for a definition."
As Henrich (Evolutionary Biology/Harvard Univ.; co-author: Why Humans Cooperate, 2007, etc.) notes, we humans are big-brained but not big enough, for "our kind are not that bright, at least not innately smart enough to explain the immense success of our species."Read full book review >
WHY TORTURE DOESN'T WORK by Shane O'Mara
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 30, 2015

"Everything you never wanted to know—but probably should—about interrogation techniques and outcomes."
A catalog of the scientific evidence of how torture is at best ineffective, usually counterproductive, and always inhumane. Read full book review >
CYBERPHOBIA by Edward Lucas
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 17, 2015

"An engaged overview of technology's strange new virtual hazards."
Ominous look at how our love of technology and "the Internet of things" have made society newly vulnerable. Read full book review >
SUSPICIOUS MINDS by Rob Brotherton
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 17, 2015

"A thoughtful, general analysis of conspiracy theories arguing that belief in secret plots is neither new nor unusual but a time-tested part of the human experience."
Combining historical anecdote and psychology research, Brotherton endeavors to explain how the human mind concocts conspiracy theories and the effects of these theories on society. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >