Science & Technology Book Reviews

Gryphon's Heir by D.R. Ranshaw
Released: June 1, 2015

"Fabulously layered mythmaking."
In this debut fantasy, a schoolteacher is thrust into a contest for a medieval throne. Read full book review >
EUREKA by Gavin Weightman
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Smart technology history that's as fun and readable as it is seriously informative."
A layman's look at the eureka moments behind inventions that have become an integral part of modern life. Read full book review >

DREAM CITIES by Wade Graham
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"Graham delivers an intriguing architectural history and an effective antidote to the excesses of urban renewal and city planning."
Garden designer and historian Graham (American Eden: From Monticello to Central Park to our Backyards: What Our Gardens Tell Us About Who We Are, 2011, etc.) explores how modern cities were built on foundations made of the fantasies and utopian dreams of individual architects.Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An important record of forward-looking thought cut short."
Collected writings of Aaron Swartz (1986-2013), prescient programmer and technology critic. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"A superbly lucid examination of a dramatic revolution in human thought that deserves a place on the shelf with Thomas Kuhn and David Deutsch."
Not exactly a history of science but of our idea of science: a shrewd, thoughtful analysis of how our view of finding truth held steady throughout history and then, over a century, changed and produced the dazzling progress we often take for granted.Read full book review >

Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"An excellent choice for both the newcomer looking for an introduction to the debate over artificial intelligence and a more sophisticated reader looking for a deep reassessment."
A synoptic overview of the debate regarding artificial intelligence coupled with a defense of the uniqueness of human consciousness. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"Engrossing techno-science delivered with gusto and sure to reach a varied audience."
A veteran science reporter examines the many innovative developments of human sensory enhancement. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"Unique, well-curated brain food for readers intrigued with the human psyche and how it can be recorded, indexed, and cross-referenced."
A detailed exploration of a historic, one-of-a-kind social archive project. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 9, 2015

"A smartly observed, important work by an IT expert with a keen eye on the future."
A timely, insightful exploration of the transformational change occurring in information technology. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 11, 2016

"An unusual and vastly entertaining journey into the world of mysterious plant life as experienced by a gifted nature writer."
A prolific and talented British nature writer explores 40 plant species and how they have influenced the human imagination over the centuries. Read full book review >
HOME by John S. Allen
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"Excellent supplementary reading for a variety of college courses, but the book's scope and accessibility make this one for general readers, too."
A neuroanthropologist tackles the questions of how home came to be a central feature of human life and what we mean when we say that we feel at home. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A compendious work that will intrigue serious readers; others may find it overlong and too comprehensive."
Hands has spent the last 10 years assembling a critical overview of scientific orthodoxy in an attempt to answer the fundamental questions "what are we?" and "why are we here?" Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >