Science & Technology Book Reviews (page 7)

JUST BABIES by Paul Bloom
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 12, 2013

"An engaging examination of human morality."
A developmental psychologist warns against a facile explanation of the origins of morality. Read full book review >
THE CURE IN THE CODE by Peter W. Huber
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 12, 2013

"Huber's political polemics detract somewhat from an otherwise intriguing discussion."
Legal expert Huber (The Bottomless Well: The Twilight of Fuel, the Virtue of Waste, and Why We Will Never Run Out of Energy, 2006, etc.) contends that government intervention in the science and practice of medicine is impeding progress. Read full book review >

THE GAP by Thomas Suddendorf
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 12, 2013

"A fine example of science made accessible for general readers, combining history, personal anecdotes, clear accounts of research and a broad picture of human evolution."
A reader-friendly examination of the great gap that exists between human beings and the rest of the animal world and an explanation of how our minds came to be unique. Read full book review >
DOGFIGHT by Fred Vogelstein
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 12, 2013

"Old-school journalism that has plenty to say about the new media and how we absorb information today."
The backbiting true story of the smartphone wars, as told from the point of view of the guys in the trenches. Read full book review >
INGENIOUS by Jason Fagone
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"A well-tooled, instructive tale of ingenuity."
The story of the teams who, for $10 million in prize money from the X Prize Foundation, are striving to make a car that will travel 100 miles on the equivalent of a gallon of gas. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"Suggestive but not entirely convincing. A modest addition to the popular psychology/self-help shelf."
A debunking of the popular treatments of "the alleged great [vertical] divide between the 'analytical/logical' left and 'artistic/intuitive' right halves of the human brain." Read full book review >
HATCHING TWITTER by Nick Bilton
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"A captivating study of male camaraderie and competition, more like the story of an indie rock band than one of the world's most ubiquitous corporations."
Novelistic rendition of Twitter's contentious origins in the techie subculture of San Francisco. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 3, 2013

"An informative, infectious introduction to the joys of electric vehicles."
Ditch your gas guzzler and rev up your electric car, urges this gung-ho manifesto. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2013

"Absorbing, insightful and quirky."
A neuropsychologist makes the shocking discovery that his brain scans are identical to those of serial killers. Read full book review >
WHAT IS CHEMISTRY? by Peter Atkins
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 2013

"A concise introduction to chemistry that has an alchemy all its own."
Atkins (Chemistry/Univ. of Oxford; Reactions: The Private Life of Atoms, 2011, etc.) presents a rounded view of chemistry in hopes of dispelling the noxious fumes produced by the high school classroom. Read full book review >
THINKING by John Brockman
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 1, 2013

"For serious readers interested in keeping up with what serious thinkers are thinking about thinking, this book offers nourishing food for thought."
Another compendium derived from the online salon Edge.com, this time essays from its section called "Mind." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"A page-turning memoir of life as a decorated astronaut."
Hadfield chronicles what it took to achieve his dream of becoming an astronaut. Read full book review >